Sugar House | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Sugar House

Item details

Name of item: Sugar House
Other name/s: Tricketts Hotel, Kings Hotel, Citibank
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Commercial
Category: Hotel
Location: Lat: -33.8687681158 Long: 151.2084932870
Primary address: 138-140 Pitt Street, Sydney, NSW 2000
Parish: St James
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP67940
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
138-140 Pitt StreetSydneySydneySt JamesCumberlandPrimary Address
102 King StreetSydneySydneySt JamesCumberlandAlternate Address
138-140 Pitt StreetSydneySydneySt JamesCumberlandDuplicate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Cadonia Pty LtdPrivate03 May 99

Description

Designer/Maker: not known
Builder/Maker: not known
Construction years: 1879-
Physical description: 138-140 Pitt Street has architectural, historic and aesthetic significance as one of the best and most intact surviving examples of a Victorian Italianate city hotel that is located in a prominent position with a strong streetscape value both in the immediate locality and when seen along King Street. The building is of particular significance for its surviving four corner tower and cupola, and as one of the distinctive landmark features of the locality. The building has fine Italianate detailing and is a very well designed building from the period. Its group value is related to the adjoining buildings in King Street and the buildings on the opposite corners fronting Pitt Street Mall, which make this intersection a key heritage precinct in the city (LEP, 2012).

This building is part of a cohesive group of late 19th to early 20th century buildings and facades near the inter-section of Pitt and King Streets. The octagonal tower, capped with a domed cupola roof, forms a dramatic counter-point to the nearby high rise buildings, and the building is a prominent corner landmark viewed from King Street against the backdrop of the MLC Centre. The building has four storeys of masonry construction and has a recessed corner tower and projecting angled bay windows to levels 1 and 2, topped with decorative iron work as in the main parapet. The building has excellent Victorian detailing, and is well designed and proportioned. The ground floor has been altered with new shopfronts (replaced several times) and new internal fitout. The upper floors retain much of their layout and detail but have been refitted with modern services including air conditioning and tower room. Category:Individual Building. Style:Victorian Italianate. Storeys:4. Facade:Painted Rendered Masonry, Stucco Detail. Side/Rear Walls:Paintered Rendered Masonry. Internal Walls:Plastered Brick. Roof Cladding:Corrugated Steel Sheeting, Copper Cladding to Cupola. Internal Structure:Load Bearing Masonry & Steel Beams. Floor:Timber Joists & Boards. Roof:Timber. Ceilings:Plaster. Stairs:Timber. Lifts:None. AirConditioned:Yes (LEP, 2012).

This building is one of the best surviving examples of the corner hotel buildings which were a familiar feature of the streetscape of Sydney's business centre in the rapid growth years of the 19th century. Its small but robust facades have exerted a striking dominance in Pitt and King Sts for more than a century. It is of particular streetscape importance to the view eastward along King St, from which point it provides the only visual relief amid the new high-rise buildings on the north side of King St.*
* For comment on this aspect of the building's significance see Architecture Australia Jan. 1977 (RNE, 1983).
Current use: mixed commercial
Former use: Aboriginal land, town lot, Sugar exchange, hotel, bridal boutique

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters.

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney.

(Information sourced from Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani )

Trade in sugar began within the first decades of settlement in Sydney. The site at 138-140 Pitt Street was for many years the city's first sugar exchange. In the late 1870s the present building was constructed as a hotel for a Sydney businessman, William Mears. It had four floors and sixteen rooms and was made of brick and shingle. It was first managed by E. Trickett, a world champion sculler. The building retained this use for the next fifty years, at least until the beginning of the Great Depression, with occasional changes to the number of rooms. It is unclear when the ground floor changed to commercial use, but since 1973 it has had a range of tenancies and fitouts and is currently being used as a bank. During the 1970s and early 1980s the site was known as Sugar House and was occupied by a bridal boutique (LEP, 2012).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Cropping-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Experimenting with new crops and methods-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Sugar farming and trading-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Global economies-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Innkeeping-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Trading amongst the Australian colonies-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Trading between Australia and other countries-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Building settlements, towns and cities-National Theme 4
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Hotel accommodation-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Accommodating travellers and tourists-

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions Record converted from HIS events
Refer to standard exemptions gazetted 23 October 1998.

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
*change of use;
*strata subdivision
* maintenance of any item (building, works, relics or places) on the site, where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing fabric.
*Minor repairs where minor repair means the repair of materials and includes replacement of minor components such as individual bricks, where these have been damaged beyond reasonable repair or are missing. Replacements should be of the same materials, colour, texture, form and design as the original it replaces.
*alterations to the interior of a building which are of a minor nature and will not adversely affect the significance of the building as an item of the environmental heritage.
Apr 6 1990
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2) OF THE HERITAGE ACT 1977

Standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977.

I, Donald Harwin, the Special Minister of State pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales do by this Order, effective 1 December 2020:

1. revoke the order made on 11 July 2008 and published on pages 91177 to 9182 of Government Gazette Number 110 of 5 September 2008 and varied by notice published in the Government Gazette on 5 March 2015; and

2. grant the exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 that are described in the attached Schedule.

Donald Harwin
Special Minister of State
Signed this 9th Day of November 2020.

To view the standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 click on the link below.
Nov 13 2020

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0041702 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0041701 Nov 85 1475714
Local Environmental PlanCSH Local Environmental Plan 4 07 Apr 00   
National Trust of Australia register NTA (NSW) Suburban Register 26 Oct 80   
Register of the National EstateSugar House206301 Nov 83   

References, internet links & images

None

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage NSW
Database number: 5045576
File number: S90/02145 & HC 33041


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