St. John's Anglican Church & Rectory | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

St. John's Anglican Church & Rectory

Item details

Name of item: St. John's Anglican Church & Rectory
Other name/s: St John's Church of England Group
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Religion
Category: Church
Location: Lat: -33.8772672953 Long: 151.2212551340
Primary address: 120 Darlinghurst Road, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010
Parish: Alexandria
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP225418
LOT2 DP225418
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
120 Darlinghurst RoadDarlinghurstSydneyAlexandriaCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Trustees St Johns Church of EnglandReligious Organisation30 Mar 99

Statement of significance:

The item is significant because it is part of one of the few unaltered Edmund Blacket buildings in Australia.
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Goold and Hilling; Edmund, Arthur & Cyril Blacket (church); J.F. Hill (rectory); Crone & Assc.(hall)
Builder/Maker: Aaron Loveridge
Construction years: 1858-1885
Physical description: The St John's Church Group comprising church, rectory and stone fencing is a fine example of a Gothic Revival Parish Church with "exceptionally well-designed later editions by Edmund Blacket, and which by reason of its size occupies a prominent position on the Darlinghurst Ridge" (National Trust of Australia (NSW)).

The St. John's site's landscape surrounding the church and rectory includes some established and mature trees, low garden planter boxes, herbaceous borders and some areas of lawn. Individual trees and precincts are outlined in figure 3.64 (Paul Davies, 2017, 55).

No evidence remains of the landscape treatement around the original 1851 church hall, of the recently built church in a c1870 photo showing an immature landscape. Site establishment elements are apparent, including fencing and paths, and a row of trees, possibly (Lombardy) poplars, north of the church. These were probably removed for construction works of the enlarged chancel, by 1886 (ibid, 2017, 55).

A semi-circular drive, carriage loop in front of the rectory leading off Darlinghurst Road is shown on a PWD City of Sydney sheet dated 1883. A fence is shown to have existed on the boundaries with Victoria Street and Darlinghurst Road (ibid, 2017, 55).

A 1902 photo shows a more-clealry established landscape with a Morton Bay fig (Ficus macrophylla) located on Darlinghurst Road, a Norfolk Island pine (Araucaria heterophylla) further north, adjacent to the school. These are well established with broad canopoies and substantial girths tot heir trunks, suggesting they were established planting from about the time the church was built (ibid, 2017, 56).

By the 1930s there had been substantial change, with the fig removed and replaced with the present camphor laurel (Cinnamomum camphora) trees. Their height in (a 1950s) photograph sguggests they had been established for about 10 years, and were probably immedate post-WW2 plantings (ibid, 2017, 56). The size of the Queensland firewheel tree (Stenocarpus sinuatus) by the south side of the church indicates it was planted about this time. This is ranked as of high significance.

From c1960s aerial photographs a well-delveoped landscaped setting to the churhc and rectory included the camphor laurel trees as the main structure of the mature planting. The area surrounding school and hall has no gardens and is covered with bitumen. The church's surrounds are treated with turf, low-height gardens and broad, gravel paths. There are a number of trees north of the church, which visually separate it from the school building (ibid, 2017, 56).

Landscape elements (around the church):
Street boundary fences:
The stone and wrought iron fences along the Darlinghurst Road frontage of the site was designed by Blacket. It consists of a rusticated sandstone base, stone piers with decorative capitals and wrought iron posts with forged spiked tops. In 1927 an iron palisade fence was built along Victoria Street in a simpler but similar design with a sandstone base and sandstone piers (ibid, 2017, 56). Both are ranked as of exceptional significance and should be conserved (ibid, 2017, xii).

Fencing of differing styles, materials and periods now enclose the site.

Within the site, a section of brick fencing on the northern side of the church, dating from the inter-war period, contains a war memorial granite plaque. The steel post and wire fence separating the rectory was built c1995. No fence separates the hall from Victoria Steret, but the hall is slightly set back and a narrow strip of lawn about 1m wide, runs along its street edge, other than the parts occupied by the Rough Edges Cafe and the screen to the large eastern window into the hall (ibid, 2017, 560.

For rectory fences, see below.

Surfaces:
Gravel paths, laid c1995, around the north and west sides of the church give access to the playground area to the north, and a bituminous driveway gives access through the site to the south of the church. Surrounding the western front of the church is crushed granite that has been laid to assist the drainage around the church's stone foundations to releive problems associated with moisture and salts. Historic photographs show that garden beds formerly surrounded the walls of the church. A small memorial garden was located adjacent to the northern porch. This has now been removed, and the small crosses engraved into the stone of the church signifies its location (ibid, 2017, 57).

(3)

A Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia) north of the church is ranked as of high significance. A stump of a former oak (Quercus sp.) north of the church is ranked as of moderate significance. Precinct B, the area facing Darlinghurst Road, and Precinct C, the area on the church's south side, are both ranked of moderate significance. Precinct D, the area on the northern side of the church is ranked of high significance. (ibid, 2017, x).

(of the Rectory):Two camphor laurels (trees 2, 3) are possibly the originals as they are located on either side of the rectory and frame the view of the rectory. The other camphor laurels (trees 4,5,6) are crowded together and may have self-seeded. The established Lord Howe Island palm (Howea fosteriana) in the front garden of the rectory has now gone (ibid, 2017, 56).

The St. John's site's key built elements comprise the following:
(1) Church (1858-1886)
This is the largest and tallest building on site, occupying a central position and oriented on the traditional east-west axis with the congregation facing the chancel to the east (ibid, 2017, 20).
A fine example of a parish church designed in the Victorian Academic Gothic style, in three stages. It is associated with the architectural firm of Goold and Hilling, who designed the original part of the church, with Edmund Blacket, who designed the transepts, tower and spire, and with Arthur & Cyril Blacket who designed the extension to the chancel, reredos and pulpit (Paul Davies, 2017, viii).

The walls of the tower are of dressed ashlar in 12" courses, sparrow picked generally with tooled margins.
The spire is of stone and has an early stone fleur-de-lis on top. A lightning conductor is mounted on top and runs down the east face of the spire.
The tower is independent of the original 1858 church on a separate 1872 foundation and consists of 4 stories: Ground floor - Serves as porch to west entrance; First floor - Bellringers; Second floor - To keep noise of bells from church and ringers. Contains an inoperative clock; Third floor - open to air by 4 large windows (National Trust of Australia (NSW)).

(2) Rectory (1867-8), Rectory Gardens, Fences (1879-1880 and 1927).
A largely intact example of the Victorian Italianate style designed by John Frederick Hilly, in the southern portion of the St. John's site, facing Darlinghurst Road, set in a generous garden with a number of mature camphor laurel trees (ibid, 2017, 35). One fo the finest rectory buildings still in use in the Sydney diocese. The residence in its street frontage garden setting, contributes to the aesthetic significance of the site as a whole and is also aesthetically significant in its own right (ibid, 2017, viii).

The garden comprises front (west) and north of the rectory - ranked of high significance. The garden to the rear (east) and south of the rectory (ranked of little significance. Two camphor laurel trees (Cinnamommum camphora) to the front are ranked of moderate significance. Five camphor laurels to the north side of the rectory are ranked as of little significance. Two giant bird-of-paradise bushes (Strelitizia nicolae) are ranked as of moderate significance. (ibid, 2017, x).

The rectory and grounds are separated from the public portion of the St. John 's site with recent timber lattice fencing. On Darlinghurst Road, a tall fence of timber palings, surmounting a sandstone block base, affords privacy to the front garden. The land slopes down to the east, at the rectory's rear, exposing the full height of its sandstone basement level. In this area, a brick fence separates the rectory from the 1966 church hall, which is located in close proximity (and which removed much of the earlier rear garden. The space remaining has been covered with lawn and has no formal planting or remnant out-building structures (ibid, 2017, 56). On the south, a six-storey Inter-War flat building ('Savoy') overlooks the rectory, its impact somewhat softened by the substantial trees in the rectory garden (ibid, 2017, 35).

(3) Hall (1965-66)(ibid, 2017, viii).
Designed in late 20th century Modernist style (ibid, 2017, 20) by Donald Crone & Associates (ibid, 2017 49).

(4) former Petrol Station (late 1960s) that occupies approximately 1/3 of the total site (ibid, 2017, 20).

A plan of the site showing areas of archaeological potential is shown on plage xii (ibid, 2017, xii).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Fair condition - regular inspections and make-safe work needed in current condition of tower and spire.
Date condition updated:03 Oct 17
Modifications and dates: 2003+ changes:
Rectory conserved and maintained, now leased as an office and no longer used as a rectory.
Church building - minor works in terms of maintenance and upgrade.
Site - minor changes (Davies, 2017, vii).
Further information: Generally the condition of the church is good and the structure appears to be sound. Clive Lucas, Stapleton & Partners architects monitored and maintained the fabric of the building and prepared a 2003 Schedule of Works for the coming years to ensure it was well-maintained. Heritage Council grants have enabled conservation of the spire's stonework and of the organ. Various areas of sacrificial render repairs and stone replacement were evident at the time of writing (2003). In 2017 the building remains in good overall condition with some works having taken place over the last 15 years. General its physical status remains as set out in 2003 (Paul Davies, 2017, 24).
Current use: Church of the Community
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, Church, Hall, School

History

Historical notes: Darlinghurst:
With its elevated position over the city, the area has been called Woolloomooloo Heights, Eastern Hill and Henrietta Town. In the 1820s, Governor Ralph Darling renamed the suburb in honour of his wife, Eliza Darling (Crosson, 2013).

By 1800 several large windmills were situated on the heights of this area, using its stiff breezes to grind much-needed flour from grain. The area began its suburban life under the name 'Henrietta Town', being called after Mrs Macquarie, whose second name was Henrietta. At that time it was an Aboriginal reserve. Loyalties changed with Governors when Darling took office, changing its name to Darlinghurst in honour of his popular wife. 'Hurst' is an old English word for a wooded hill.

Darlinghurst was once quite a fashionable suburb and it housed some famous people. One of the grandest houses was the mansion Craigend, built by NSW Surveyor-General Sir Thomas Mitchell, in 1828-31. It stood on nearly 4 hectares now bordered by Kings Cross Road, Surrey Street and Victoria Road. David Scott Mitchell (1836-1706), the wealthy bachelor who endowed the Mitchell Library with 70,000 pounds and his valuable book and document collection relating to Australi and the Pacific region, was a longer-term resident, moving from the family home in Cumberland Street in the Rocks in 1871. He then lived unostentatiously at 17 Darlinghurst Road until his death in 1907.

The gilt went off the suburb when Darlinghurst Gaol, designed by Colonial Architect Mortimer Lewis was built in 1841. It was not its style, but the significance of its erection that was the reason for the decline in Darlinghurst's popularity. Governor Brisbane had reserved 3.5 acres on Sydney's outskirts for a new gaol to replace the earlier lock-up in George Street. In 1823 a stockade was erected. Convicts quarried the stone from nearby William Street and hauled it to the hill top, where other convict gangs shaped up the blocks by hand. The completed enclosure was known as Woolloomooloo Stockade. Construction commenced in 1836 and was complete by 1841. Prisoners from George Street prison were marched in chains to Darlinghurst to the jeers and catcalls of the watching crowd. The first public hanging took placed at the new gaol on 29/10/1841. The last public hanging in Sydney was in 1907.

The gaol was closed as a prison in June 1914 for German refugees during the First World War. In 1921 the building became the East Sydney Technical College. The Court House beside the gaol, facing Taylor Square, was also designed by Mortimer Lewis, and opened in 1842. It remains in use today.

The suburb's main thoroughfare, William Street, was named after King William IV, who reigned from 1830 to 1837 and was often scathingly referred to as Sailor Bill, or even Silly Billy (Pollen & Murphy, 1988, 77-79).
:
Nineteenth century Sydneysiders who wanted a home with a view knew that Darlinghurst was the place to build. The highest point in inner Sydney is near the corner of Darley Street and Darley Place. By the middle of the century this had become a fashionable residential area. Mansions were built, particularly towards the harbour where there were water views. The people of Darlinghurst then built themselves a church.

St. John's Church:
The first development on the site was construction in 1851 of the school hall. This was used for church services until 1858 when the first stage of St. John's Church was completed (Paul Davies, 2017, 2).

St John's Church was built by newly wealthy people to recreate something they knew in England. It was a time when church going and church support were fashionable, and the colonial congregation of successful people had no trouble paying for this imposing and beautiful structure.

In 1856 the foundation stone was laid "in the presence of a large and respectable assembly" said the newspaper EMPIRE, 29/12/1856.

In 1858 the sandstone neo-gothic building seating 700 was opened. The building was decorated with windows and plaques, most of which commemorate the lives and service of the resident's class of people. But this was only the nave. Allowance had been made for the later addition of a chancel, tower and transepts.

Without the tower it was a beautiful, ornate building, but it was not good enough for the people of Darlinghurst. In 1871 one benefactor said that while the inside was fine, the church was "unsightly from the road and a discredit to the parish".
Following such agitation, the transepts, tower and spire were added by 1875, and the chancel by 1885.
(Notes from the work of the historian Paul Egan - taken from "A Stroll around St John's" 24/1/1993).

Stage 1 of St Johns - the nave, aisles and north porch - was the work of the architectural firm Goold and Hilling. Their decorated Gothic design would b more acclaimed if Edmund Blacket had not come to dominate church architecture in Sydney (ibid, 1993).

A substantial rectory was built in 1868 to the south of the site and both church and rectory remain today. The original school hall, and the second school and hall that replaced it in 1903 are now gone and in their place a disused service station built in 1965 to generate ongoing cashflow to fund the church's community ministries (ibid, 2017, 2).

In 1871 Blacket commenced work on the unusually ornate tower and spire. The tower is the major feature of the building. Because Blacket's additions are so prominent, St John's "now owes precious little of its outward appearance to Goold and Hilling" (Herman), though Blacket's design work is seen only in the large windows at the end of each transept, the tower and spire, the floor tiling and the reredos (ibid, 1993).

Later stages of construction completed the church in 1886 creating a commanding strucvture with tower and spire reflecting its prominence and importance within the Darlinghurst area and on Sydney's eastern ridgeline (ibid, 2017, 2).

In 1897 the church debt was finally cleared, with payments for the new chancel and organ. In June 1903 a new school and hall building was opened by the Bishop of Gippsland. Designed by George Allen Mansfield, it replaced the original stone school building on the site adjoining the church (to its north). The school was two storeys, with school rooms downstairs, and church hall upstairs. It could accommodate 400 pupiles, and the hall could seat 500. The church was consecrated by the Archbishop of Sydney in September 1905 (ibid, 2017, 4-5).

In 1924 a side chapel was erected on the church chancel's north side in memory of Mrs HC Dangar, and in 1927 a new iron fence with double gates was erected on Victoria Street to replace ones previously damaged (ibid, 2017, 5).

To the east of the rectory is the current church hall, opened in 1966, built with proceeds from the transaction that saw the northern part of the site leased initially for the petrol station, later as a car hire franchise, and currently for parking (ibid, 2017, 2). With the school closed there was no longer a need for the associated playground, and Rev. Morton investigated a plan to lease the site of the old school and hall and build a new modern hall on vacant land behind the rectory. After negotiation, the land was leased to Caltex Petroleum for 20 years. The contract included up-front provision of a new hyall and a partially-indexed rent for the property, with the church responsible for the rest of the commercial site. The petrol station was built once the school/hall had been demolished in 1966. The new hall was designed for use as a theatre as well as a community hall, with a stage, professional lighting and production rooms (ibid, 2017, 6).

In 1986 Caltex Petroleum's lease epxired and the site was leased to Bayswater Hire Car P/L as base for their inner Sydney hire fleet. Negotiations finalised a base rent of $200,000 per annum for five years. This meant that St. JOhn's was financially secure for the first time in many years and could diretc money to church and rectory restoration, as well as establishment of a number of new ministries (ibid, 2017, 6).

In 1986 a major change to the Parish's working was its amalgamation with St. Peter's, East Sydney. WIth that came the use of the St. Peter's Hall that was to house the new PJ's drop-in centre. PJ's (named after Peter and John, the churches) was a new initiative catering to the homeless, disadvantaged, prostitutes and other needy community members. It operated out of the basement of St. Peter's Hall. Also in 1986 a permanent conservation order was placed on the property under the NSW Heritage Act 1977, by the Heritage Council of NSW (ibid, 2017, 6).

The Bayswater Hire Car lease for the northern portion of hte site expired in April 2000 resulting in loss of revenue to support the church and its programs. The church began exploring possible development options for the site to ensure sufficient revenue to enable continuation of its primary functions and programs that offer support to the underprivileged and disenfranchised, as well as the necessary maintenance of buildings and elements of heritage significance (ibid, 2017, 6). In recent years the Petrol station site was used as a car wash, and the owners of that business vacated the site on 12 June 2017 (ibid, 2017, 54).

Great changes have occurred within the Darlinghurst area since commencement of church services over 150 years ago. The population has grown immenesly and hte demographics have continually changed. Originally built for an affluent middle class community that lived in the villas of Darlinghurst, the church, for most of the second half of the 20th century, served the poorer and often-disenfranchised community who gravitated to the area as the middle classes moved out to the newer suburbs. In response to those changes the church provided not only spiritual support but community assistance and advocacy to those most in need. Today, the area is undergoing another change with the return of the affluent middle classess who are attracted to the inner city lifestyle and are moving away from suburban living. St. John's continues to provide support to the disenfranchiesd through its drop-in centre, internet access cafe and counselling service, whilst engaging and supporting those new residents to the area (ibid, 2017, 2).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Topography: How did the environment, topography and the River influence early settlement? Is there a strong relationship-Peopling the Continent Contact
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant Places: How are significant places marked in the landscape of Parramatta by, or for, different groups?-Monuments and Sites
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of urban amenity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of institutions - productive and ornamental-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Stone Wall-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Alienating Crown Lands for religious purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Fencing boundaries - wrought or cast iron fencing-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Living in the City-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of urban estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th Century Infrastructure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in suburban settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages living in the suburbs-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Beautifying towns and villages-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Private education-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Educating people in suburban locations-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Private (religious) schooling-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian Italianate-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to utlilitarian structures-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - 20th century Modern Movement-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Gothic Revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ornamental Garden-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Practising Anglicanism-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Providing halls and other community facilities-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Providing schools and education-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship church hall-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Church-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Arthur Blacket, architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Edmund Blacket, Government Architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Frederick Hilly, architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Cyril Blacket, architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Goold and Hilling, architects-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
St John's Church with its rectory, grounds and fence form the most intact 19th century group of church buildings in Sydney. The church building with its tower, spire, transepts and chancel is one of the few unaltered Edmund Blacket buildings in Australia and is the most richly executed Gothic Revival parish church in Australia.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The tower and spire make a major contribution to the Darlinghurst streetscape, with the advantage of a prominent position
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The tower and spire dominate the surrounding buildings and mark a place of peace and refuge in Kings Cross. St John's reflects the grwoth and changes of the local community over the years.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
It is one of the most intact 19th Century group of church buildings in Sydney, and one of the few unaltered Edmund Blacket buildings in Australia.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
St John's church is an excellent example of the English "medieval parish church" style built in Australia during the 19th Century.
Integrity/Intactness: St John's church and rectory remain basically unaltered and intact.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act Record converted from HIS events.

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any item on the site meaning the continuous protective care of existing materials.
(2) Alterations to the existing Church Hall and Community Centre building and Service Station provided that these do not add to the external bulk of the buildings.
Jul 25 1986
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentSt John's Site, Darlinghurst CMP, (Godden Mackay Logan, September 2002) Apr 11 2003
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0046102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0046125 Jul 86 1233632
Local Environmental Plan  05 Mar 93   
Register of the National EstateSt. Johns Anglican Church Group; Rectory1982; 198321 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
South Sydney Heritage Study1996 Tropman & Tropman  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenDesign 5 Architects1994The Church of St. John the Evangelist: Conservation Analysis and Conservation Policy
WrittenDesign 5 Architects1994St John's Darlinghurst, Conservation Analysis and Conservation Policy
WrittenGeraldine Obrien2003Blacket church will vanish as high-rises fence it in (SMH 18/6/03)
WrittenMrs Sonia J Fenton1999NSW State Heritage Inventory Form
WrittenPaul Davies P/L2017St. John's Site, Darlinghurst, 120 Darlinghurst Road - Conservation Management Plan
WrittenPaul Egan1985A History of St John's Parish and Church
WrittenPollen, F. & Healy, G. (ed.s)1988'Darlinghurst' in The Book of Sydney Suburbs
WrittenSt John's Anglican Church1993"A Stroll Around St John's"
WrittenWeir Phillips Heritage2017Interpretation Strategy - HammondCare Aged Care Facility - 118A & 120 Darlinghurst Road, Darlinghurst

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045590
File number: EF14/5585 ;S90/1767; HC32550


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