Church of Holy Trinity | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Church of Holy Trinity

Item details

Name of item: Church of Holy Trinity
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Religion
Category: Church
Location: Lat: -34.4902068073 Long: 150.3365625260
Primary address: Argyle Street, Berrima, NSW 2577
Parish: Berrima
County: Camden
Local govt. area: Wingecarribee
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Illawarra
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT101 DP1004483
LOT102 DP1004483
LOT103 DP1004483
LOT104 DP1004483
LOT103DP758098
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
Argyle StreetBerrimaWingecarribeeBerrimaCamdenPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Anglican Church Property TrustReligious Organisation15 Mar 99

Statement of significance:

The Holy Trinity Church is the first church individually designed by the state’s leading Gothic Revival architect Edmund Blacket, who would then go on to design over 100 churches, including five cathedrals, throughout Australia. The church is significant because of its social and religious associations with the local community. It is also significant through its associations with both Bishop (later Archbishop) Broughton - Australia's first Anglican Archbishop, and Edmund Blacket. It is a good representative example of the smaller Gothic Revival churches Blacket designed for various towns throughout the state and is one of the earliest of these buildings. The siting and relative intactness of the building's early fabric enhance its significance.
Date significance updated: 10 Feb 05
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Edmund Blacket
Builder/Maker: William Munro
Construction years: 1847-1849
Physical description: The site consists of the church and a later utilitarian timber weatherboard church hall to its north nearer Argyle Street. More than half the site is covered with scrub and maritme pine forest (Pinus pinaster) to the east and south, a significant proportion of this area also slopes steeply towards the Wingecarribee River. The sections of the site that are accessible but that are outside the fence line form part of the parkland surrounds of the site. The neighbouring site to the south has recently been cleared of trees in an attempt to clear the flow of the river.

Within the fenced area, the southern part of the site is a wide expanse with few trees, a level cleared area with sandstone outcrops at the surface throughout. The northern part of the site is dominated by an extensive sandstone outcrop, which incorporates a significant change in level, and a relatively dense cover of mature trees.

Trees in the grounds include some rare and unusual exotic species, such as: Chinese funeral cypress (Cupressus funebris) west of/beside the hall; Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) on the main stone outcrop and many maritime pines (P.pinaster) from California and Southern Europe respectively; Mediterranean/'Irish' strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) on the left inside the main entry gate twoards the church's entry porch; Bhutan cypress (C.torulosa) north of the church; native matt rush (Lomandra sp.) on the rocky outcrop and under the pines; Tasmanian blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus ssp. globulus) west of the church; New Zealand lowland flax (Phormium tenax) on the rocks between gate and porch; Mediterranean cypress (C.sempervirens) near the gate; and Asian arborvitae (Thujopsis dolobrata) north of the hall (Stuart Read, visit, 20/7/13).

The Holy Trinity Anglican Church is sited near the midpoint of the cleared area of the site, whilst the church hall is close to the fence at the north western extremity of the site. It is located on a high point at the eastern end of the central market place, in the heart of Berrima. Its site frontage stretches the full width of the market place along Argyle Street and stretches back through thick scrub and a steep slope to the banks of the Wingecarribee River.

The church itself is in the Early English Gothic Revival style used by Edmund Blacket throughout his career, and is typical of his rural churches. It is built of sandstone quarried from the banks of the Wingecarribee River, and features four equal bays running east-west with a northern porch and southern vestry.

The stonework is laid in ashlar coursing with simple hood mouldings to windows and relatively small buttresses to corners along north and south sides. A small gabled porch with boarded doors is located on the north elevation. The west elevation features a single lancet headed window with stone tracery, stained glass and a small stone belfry with a conical roof at the apex of the gable. The original ceiling may well have been finished in blue with silver stars as it is now. The stained glass windows have been added over the course of time.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
There is no indication of archaeological potential in the areas to be affected by the program of works and the potential is assessed as low (2004). This may need to be re-assessed by a qualified archaeologist.
Date condition updated:09 Aug 13
Modifications and dates: Originally shingle-roofed, with windows of diamond-shaped leadlights which were gradually replaced by stained glass windows (Emery, 1999, 100).

Structurally, the interior has been little altered, but over the years most of the furniture and fittings specified by Blacket have been replaced. Late last century, the original pews, made in Sydney from (red) cedar supplied by William Byrne of Sutton Forest, were replaced, along with the sanctuary rails, chairs and prayer desk (ibid, 1999, 100).
Further information: Federal CHHP funding of $85,850 for conservation work
Current use: Anglican church, hall and yard
Former use: Aboriginal land, town lot

History

Historical notes: Berrima is the second oldest (European) settlement in Wingecarribee Shire and the oldest continuing settlement in the shire. The first town settlement in the district was in 1821 at Bong Bong, 8km south-east of Berrima on the Wingecarribee River (Webb, 2008, 9).

The site of Berrima was selected by Surveyor General Sir Thomas Mitchell in 1829 on a visit planning the route for a new road alignment from Sydney to replace the old Argyle Road, which had proven unsatisfactory due to a steep hill climb over the Mittagong Range and river crossing at Bong Bong. In 1830 Mitchell instructed Robert Hoddle to mark out the town based on a plan Mitchell's office prepared, along the lines of a traditional English village (with a central market place and as many blocks as possible facing onto the WIngecarribee River), and using the local Aboriginal name. The new line of road came through the town (Allman Johnston, 2007). Berrima was to be established as the commercial and administrative centre for the County of Camden.

Following the approval of Governor Bourke in 1831, the period 1824 to 1841 saw significant flourishing development as mail coaches changed their route to this new line of road. Early town lots were sold in 1833, predominantly to inn keepers and around Market Square, including the first town Lot sales to Bryan McMahon (Webb, 2008, 9).

Governor Bourke designated Berrima as a place for a courthouse and gaol to serve the southern part of the state (Webb, 2008, 9). With construction of the Jail from 1835-9 and its Court House in 1838 to serve the southern part of the state the town flourished into the 1840s as mail coaches called, public buildings including churches in 1849 and 1851, establishment of many hotels and coaching houses to service local resident needs and passing trades, persons and commercial travellers. Its 1841 population was 249 with 37 houses completed and 7 more in construction. Research has indicated there were some 13 hotels or grog houses in Berrima at the one time in the early days before the coming of the Southern Railway to the Moss Vale area, which by-passed Berrima (Allman Johnston, 2005).

Berrima had been established 18 years before it had a church in which its residents could worship. A subscription list for erection of a church was opened in May 1841, but it was another 4 years before the people of Berrima were ready to consult architect Edmund Blacket about the design of Holy Trinity Church.

The foundation stone for the church was laid by the Anglican Bishop William Grant Broughton on 7 April 1847 and he returned to consecrate the church on 9 June 1849. It was the first permanent house of worship in Berrima and its opening service was attended by some 150 people (Emery, 1999, 100). The church is built of local sandstone quarried nearby.

Holy Trinity was built by William Munro for 900 pounds. (National Trust, undated). Munro was a builder from Liverpool, who successfully tendered to build the church. He had come with a recommendation from Bishop Broughton, for whom he had completed a number of buildings. Presumably he pleased not only the Church of England, but also the Catholic Archbishop John Bede Polding, for in 1849, as the building of Holy Trinity was being completed, Munro began work on St. Scholastica's (now St. Francis Xavier) Catholic Church, itself notable as one of only two churches in Australia designed by the English Gothic Revivalist, Augustus Pugin (Emery, 1999, 100).

Holy Trinity church is one of the first designed by architect Edmund Blacket in the simple Gothic Revival style. The design was modelled on the 15th century church of St Peter in Biddestone, Wiltshire. A plan of St Peter's appears in Augustus Pugin's "Examples of Gothic Architecture" in 1840. Holy Trinity Berrima is considerably larger than St Peters, Biddlestone and Blacket modified the design and added numerous details such as the Perpendicular Gothic elements in the chancel arch, the east and west windows and the open timber hammer beam roof (National Trust, undated).

Pattern books for buildings of all types were common in the 19th century and Blacket's early work was certainly influenced by them (Emery, 1999, 100).

Blacket found his way to Berrima from Southwark, Surrey where he was born in 1817. He left England in 1842 to build his own career, stopped over in Sydney on his way to New Zealand, and was eventually appointed Colonial Architect. A self-trained architect he designed 58 churches including St. Andrew's Cathedral in Sydney (National Trust, undated).

Stained glass windows are a feature of the church, most over 100 years old. The two on the right hand side of the entry door are believed to be over 200 years old. With its setting on a hilltop of pines Holy Trinity is one of Berrima's landmarks (National Trust, undated).

John Norton Oxley, son of surveyor and explorer John Oxley, was not only one of the first trustees of Holy Trinity, but a generous subscriber to the building fund. As well as meeting the cost of Blacket's plans, he arranged for the casting of the bells for the charming bellcote, one of the church's most distinctive features. Made by the Sydney Foundry to Blacket's specifications, the two bells weighed 50 pounds and 60 pounds each so they would ring with a whole tone between them. Another trustee, James Jerome Higgins, a storekeeper in Berrima and builder of the Magistrate's house just down the hill from the church, seems to have been responsible for the purchase of vestments, carpets and other accessories. From David Jones (in Sydney) came four pairs of silk ottoman tassels and laces for the linen. Fifteen yards of gold cotton church velvet at a cost of two shillings a yard came from Thompson's Drapery in Pitt Street, Sydney and T. Fawcett & Co. manufactured 16 yards of communion carpet for just under four pounds (Emery, 1999, 100).

The windows of diamond-shaped leadlights were gradually replaced by stained glass windows, reflecting not only the light, but also the history of Berrima itself, through memorials to the families who lived there. The three windows above the altar commemorate one of Berrima's leading and most-respected citizens, James Powell, shopkeeper, postmaster and banker. Near the entrance door are two mid-18th century windows said to have come from St. Neot's parish church in Cornwall. A small window in the sanctuary dedicated to Camden Galbraith, the three-year old son of William and Mary McCourt, who died on Christmas eve, 1886. Little Tay, as he was known to his parents, died from complications from blood poisoning after an ant bite became infected. His father began the district's first newspaper, 'The Moss Vale Scrutineer and West Camden Advocate' in 1874 and in 1882 became the local member of parliament (Emery, 1999, 100).

The 1851 census showed the number of Berrima's buildings remained the same but its population had dropped to 192. During the 1850s Berrima experienced another boom period after the discovery of gold. When the Great Southern Railway bypassed Berrima in 1867 the town again began to decline as Mittagong, Moss Vale and Bowral developed. Berrima remained virtually unchanged for the next 100 years, preserving the town as an almost intact colonial village (Webb, 2008, 10).

The church Hall was built over 100 years ago (Davies, 2004).

The church was rededicated in 1957 by the then Archbishop of Canterbury The Most Rev. Geoffrey Fisher. The stained glass windows are reputed to be over five hundred years old and imported from the United Kingdom.

In 1948 the Berrima Training Centre, a minimum security correctional centre opened at the Berrima Gaol. In the 1960s the National Trust of Australia (NSW) started to classify and seek to protect heritage properties (Webb, 2008, 22).

Since the classification of a number of buildings in Berrima by the National Trust of Australia (NSW) in the 1960s, the popularity of Berrima has increased, particularly as a tourist destination. Recent developments in the town have seen the emergence of bed and breakfast accomodation facilities, reflecting the early years of the town's development that provided accomodation for travellers through the construction and operation of various inns (Webb, 2008, 10).

In 1992 the Sydney to Canberra Freeway (F5) bypassed Berrima (Webb, 2008, 22).

The organising committee for commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Holy Trinity planned and ran a number of events in 1999. The Berrima and District Historical Society in association with that committee presented a grand concert inside the church on March 20, 1999 (ibid, 1999, 100).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant Places How are significant places marked in the landscape by, or for, different groups-Monuments and Sites
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Gardens and landscapes reminiscent of an 'old country'-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Building settlements, towns and cities-National Theme 4
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Architectural design-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to tourist-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Townships-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Suburban Centres-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing the social life of a rural community-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Planning relationships between key structures and town plans-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Vernacular towns serving a specific industry-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing towns in response to topography-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Planned towns serving a specific industry-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Beautifying towns and villages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages living in the country-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Shaping riverine settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Shaping inland settlements-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages A Picturesque Residential District-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Roadside Villages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th Century Infrastructure-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Developing cultural institutions and ways of life-National Theme 8
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Gothic Revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Gothic Revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (mid)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing making and using ecclesiastical furniture-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. work of stonemasons-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing structures to emphasise their important roles-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Performing important ceremonies and rituals-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing in an exemplary architectural style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Anglican Community-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Practising Anglicanism-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship church hall-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Church-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Bishop William Grant Broughton, Anglican bishop of Australia-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Munro, well known Scottish builder become architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Edmund Blacket, Government Architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Augustus Welby N Pugin, leading English Gothic Revival architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Powell, Cornish migrant, Berrima storekeeper-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Norton Oxley, son of explorer, Trustee and benefactor, Holy Trinity church Berrima-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Jerome Higgins, storekeeper and builder-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Byrne, Sutton Forest farmer and landholder-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Hon. William McCourt MLA, newspaper proprietor and MP for Berrima-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Emily McCourt, gentlewoman-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Camden Galbraith McCourt, child who died young-

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementProduce a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0009602 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0009616 Jan 81 80325
Local Environmental Plan  06 Jan 84  35
Local Environmental Plan 198912 Jan 90 00700291

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenEmery, Linda1999'150 years of devotion'
WrittenNational Trust of Australia (NSW)(Berrima District Branch) A Church Ramble - visit four very different heritage churches in the southern highlands
WrittenPaul Davies Pty Ltd2004Statement of Heritage Impact
WrittenWebb, Chris & Charlotte2008Conservation Management Plan, Coach & Horses Inn, 24 Jellore Street, Berrima

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045594
File number: S90/05783 & HC 32518


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