Edinglassie | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Edinglassie

Item details

Name of item: Edinglassie
Type of item: Landscape
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -32.3031817861 Long: 150.8290432170
Primary address: 710 Denman Road, Muswellbrook, NSW 2333
Parish: Brougham
County: Durham
Local govt. area: Muswellbrook
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Wanaruah
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT15 DP228159
LOT141 DP533001
LOT1 DP601359
LOT1 DP90622
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
710 Denman RoadMuswellbrookMuswellbrookBroughamDurhamPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

Primary Significance:
The Edinglassie property including the Edinglassie homestead, associated buildings and Rous Lench cottage are closely associated with the earliest European occupation of the area and collectively represent one of the earliest land grants of the initial settlement of the Hunter Valley;

The Edinglassie property demonstrates various phases of human activities such as settlement and clearing, water supply and management, sheep and cattle running, development of specialist cattle breeding activities, recreation, viticulture and horse breeding;

The Edinglassie homestead with its associated outbuildings and Rous Lench cottage are good architectural examples of their type and style;

The Edinglassie property demonstrates an excellent application of the Arcadian design approach to the siting of structures and elements in the landscape which is rare in the region;

Secondary significance:
The place is also significant because:
It is associated with George Forbes, the original grantee, who was one of the 'gentry' settlers in the early settlement of the area;

It is associated with a prominent family, the Whites, a leading pastoral dynasty, who were synonymous with the opening and development of the region;

It illustrates the degree of opulence achieved and lifestyles led by the leading pastoral families in the area;

It is associated with a significant Australian architect, John Horbury Hunt;

It is a well known landmark, and has provided a community focus over a number of generations form the turn of the 19th century;

It has extant and potential intact archaeological evidence capable of helping interpret past occupation and lifestyles of the area (Tropman & Tropman Architects, 1993, 149).

The siting of the homestead is intrinsic to its significance.
Date significance updated: 31 Jul 07
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1880-1895
Physical description: Site/Grounds
The house is approached through original iron gates and through well kept grounds containing many fine mature trees, including some Queensland species brought from other White family properties. The homestead is set back from the access road, and a substantial line of screening trees fronts the entrance. The siting of the homestead is intrinsic to its significance.

House
A 2 storey sandstone house with hipped iron roof of simplified Italianate style built in two stages c1880, and c1895, for James White. Each elevation is assymetrical about a large full height projecting bay with a continuous single storey verandah (originally 2 stories to east and south) supported on cast iron columns stamped `F. REVETT, W. MAITLAND.'

The fourteen principal rooms have a variety of pressed metal ceilings and marble and timber fireplaces whilst the fine joinery throughout is of cedar. All joinery has been sensitively restored.

Outbuildings
A timber bridge links across a large trussed roof breezeway to a 2 storey service wing containing the original kitchen. Close to the house is the fine stables group of buildings designed by Hunt in timber and built in the 1880s. Although lacking in the more exuberant details characteristic of Hunt's work, these buildings nonetheless form a coherent and impressive whole. Other buildings include a meat house, killing shed and dovecote.

Site/Grounds
The house is approached through original iron gates and through well kept grounds containing many fine mature trees, including some Queensland species brought from other White family properties.
Modifications and dates: 2004 Power line installed across front of property, involving the removal of 3 trees: The proposal involves the removal of 3 trees. An arborist report, submitted as part of the application identifies this fabric as:

1 x yellow box, Eucalyptus melliodora, 40-45 years old, 12 meters high &
2 x Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra 'Italica), native to Italy. 10-14 years old. 5 meters high
Current use: Mining
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, grazing, agriculture

History

Historical notes: The land on which both Edinglassie and Rous Lench are located was the original Portion 4 of the Parish of Brougham in the County of Durham. This comprised an area of 1280 acres the deed of grant for which was issued to George Forbes on 1 August 1839. Like many grants of the period the land had been occupied for many years before it was officially surveyed and the deed grant issued.

A 2 storey sandstone house with hipped iron roof of simplified Italianate style built in two stages c1880, and c1895, for James White.

James White (1801-1840) - owner, Edinglassie 1826-40):
James White arrived in Sydney on 24 July 1826 in the Fairfield as an overseer for the Australian Agricultural (AA) Co., and acquired land in the Hunter district including Edinglassie, near Muswellbrook. In 1842 he died (aged 41, at Edinglassie) leaving goods valued for probate at (Pounds)15,000 and real estate, to be divided equally among his 7 sons and 2 daughters (Obituaries Australia, Ntnl.Centre for Biography, ANU: 'White, James (1801-1842)', accessed online 10/12/2019). White owned the estates of Edenglassie, Timor, a property on the Isis, and Boorrooma on the Barwon River, about 40 miles below the junction of the Namoi (Obituaries Australia entry for 'White, James (Jr.) (1828-1890)').

James White (1828-1890): (co-owner, Edinglassie 1840-1890):
(the following is from Rutledge, Martha, in ADB, 1976, accessed online 10/12/2019):
James White, pastoralist and racehorse owner and breeder, was born on 19 July 1828 at Stroud, NSW, eldest son of James White (1801-1842) and his wife Sarah, nee Crossman. In 1842 his father died (at Edinglassie) leaving goods valued for probate at (Pounds)15,000 and real estate, to be divided equally among his seven sons and two daughters. James returned home to manage Edinglassie, Timor, and Boorrooma on the Barwon River.

In partnership with his brothers Francis (Frank) and George, James leased Belltrees, near Scone, from William Charles Wentworth in 1848, bought it in 1853 and later added the adjoining Waverley station. From 1848 they acquired other freehold property in the Hunter River district including Merton and Dalswinton. About 1860 White bought the freehold estate, Martindale, near Muswellbrook, where he lived in the 1860s and made well known for fattening cattle. He was a magistrate and in 1864 a sheep director for Merriwa.

In December James White was elected by a large majority to the Legislative Assembly for the Upper Hunter, despite abuse from his opponent Thomas Dangar. In favour of free selection, railway expansion and taxes on luxuries, he confessed himself 'not quite equal to grapple' with the education question. On 8 May 1868 he resigned from parliament and visited England and the United States of America; while in England he and his brothers bought Segenhoe in the Hunter Valley. Soon after his return, he was defeated for the Upper Hunter by John Mildred Creed.

About 1873 James White bought Cranbrook, Rose Bay, from the estate of Robert Towns and engaged architect John Horbury Hunt to carry out large extensions. He filled it with 'costly art treasures': European porcelain and pictures by Italian, German and English artists.

In 1875 James sold Martindale to his brother Edward in consideration of an annuity of (Pounds)5000 to himself and (Pounds)2500 to his wife. On 14 July 1874 he was appointed to the Legislative Council; next year he was elected to the local Royal Society and became a founding member of the Linnean Society of New South Wales. A representative commissioner for New South Wales at the Philadelphia International Exhibition in 1876, he was also a commissioner for the exhibitions in Paris (1878) and Melbourne (1880) and the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, London (1886). In the 1880s he was a vice-president of the Agricultural Society of New South Wales, the Horticultural Society of New South Wales and the Union Club, a committee-man of the Animals' Protection Society of New South Wales, a member of the Warrigal Club and a director and sometime chairman of the Mercantile Bank of Sydney.

A long-time committee-man of the Australian Jockey Club, James was chairman in 1880 and 1883-90 and did much to promote racing. His first two horses were Goulburn and Hotspur, steeplechasers which won many cross-country races. In the mid-1870s he bought Kirkham, near Camden, where Hunt built him two houses, one a 'French inspired fairy castle'. Kirkham became his main horse-stud, although he also bred horses at Segenhoe and paid high prices for promising youngsters, such as 1200 guineas for Martini Henry. He also built the lavish Newmarket Stables at Randwick where his horses were trained by Michael Fennelly (d.1887) and later by Tom Payten. In 1876 White bought Chester from Edward Cox and next year began a sensational twelve-year career on the turf when Chester won the Victoria Racing Club's Derby-Melbourne Cup double; the stallion had 19 wins from 29 starts and was only 3 times unplaced before becoming top sire. White won five A.J.C. Derbys in 1884-89, five A.J.C. Sires' Produce Stakes in 1885-90, five V.R.C. St Legers in 1886-90 and six V.R.C. Derbys in 1877-90, among most other important races. Out of 302 rides for him Tom Hales rode 137 winners. White's other great horses included Martini Henry, winner of the Victoria Derby-Melbourne Cup double; Abercorn, who raced against Carbine and whose wins included the A.J.C. Sires' Produce Stakes and the A.J.C. Derby (1887), the Australasian Champion Stakes and A.J.C. St Leger (1888) and the Metropolitan (1889); Democrat, winner of the Sydney Cup-Metropolitan double (1878); and Derby winners Nordenfeldt, Trident, Ensign, Dreadnought and Singapore. Possessed of 'the most consummate judgment in all matters of breeding, training, and racing thoroughbred horses', he was reputed to have collected over (Pounds)121,000 in stakes from 66 horses winning 252 races. White was also a heavy punter and reputedly won (Pounds)25,000 on Martini Henry's double, but was popular with the racing public as he never tried to bluff them. He planned to win the Epsom Derby and bred three colts by Chester to English time. In England they were supervised by Septimus Alfred Stephen but only Kirkham carried White's pale blue and white colours in Sainfoin's Derby in 1890 and was unplaced. He sent another contingent to England next year.

Early in 1890 James White retired as chairman of the A.J.C. and in April sold most of his racehorses for some 16,745 guineas, Titan bringing the record price of 4600 guineas. In 1889 he had given twenty blood mares to his nephews at Belltrees. James died of heart disease at Cranbrook on 13 July 1890 and was buried in the Anglican section of Waverley cemetery. He was survived by his wife Emily Elizabeth, daughter of James Arndell, whom he had married at Merton, New South Wales, on 9 July 1856; she shared his love of racing. His estate was valued for probate at almost (Pounds)350,000 and willed to his brothers, nephews, and his wife who inherited Cranbrook, Kirkham, (Pounds)5000 and an annuity of (Pounds)2500. On 4 August 1896 at the Woollahra Presbyterian Church Emily White married Captain William Scott, M.R.C.V.S., aged 37 and principal veterinary surgeon in the New South Wales Defence Forces; she died on 28 October 1897 at Melrose, Roxburghshire, Scotland.

Francis John (Frank) White (owner, Edinglassie, 1863-1875):
White's brother Francis (Frank: 1830-1875) was born at Ravensworth, New South Wales, on 21 April 1830. Educated at Maitland by Gregor and Rev. Thomas Aitken he qualified as a surveyor before returning to Edinglassie. On 6 July 1853 he married Mary Hannah Cobb of Anambah, and lived at Belltrees for ten years before settling at Edinglassie, his share of his father's estate. Genial and generous he was 'a principal mover in all public matters' in Muswellbrook, where he was chairman of the bench of magistrates and president of the hospital board and the agricultural society. In 1875 he was elected to the Legislative Assembly for the Upper Hunter but died suddenly of fever at Edinglassie on 4 May. He was survived by his wife, a daughter and six sons, of whom the most notable were James Cobb of Edinglassie, a well-known breeder of Aberdeen Angus cattle, and Henry Luke of Belltrees (Obituaries Australia, Ntnl.Ctre.for Biography, ANU, entry for 'White, Francis John (Frank) (1830-1875)', accessed online 10/12/2019).

James Cobb White (owner Edinglassie, 1875-1927):
James Cobb White (1855-1927) was a member of the Legislative Council from July, 1908, appointed during the term of office of the Wade Government. He voted against the bill to abolish the Upper House, and was present in the Legislative Council in December 1927, when he voted in favour of the protest to the Governor against the Government in calling Parliament together in spite of the pledge given by the Premier that an election would be held within four months.

J.C. White was born near Scone on November 29, 1855, a son of the late Mr. Francis White, one of the pioneers of the Upper Hunter. He was educated at Grammar School, Newcastle, and later in Sydney. J.C. White was a public-spirited man, associated with the Muswellbrook Hospital for many years, and for several terms president. He was president of the Muswellbrook Shire Council, president of the Upper Hunter Pastoral and Agricultural Association, chairman of the Denman Pastures Protection Board, and member of the Licensing Court. Mr White was a noted breeder of polled Angus cattle, and he had resided at Edinglassie for many years (Sydney Morning Herald, 19/1/1927, 18, in Obituaries Australia, NCBiography, ANU, entry on 'White, James Cobb (1855-1927)', accessed online 10/12/2019).

James White (owner, Edinglassie, 1927-45):
James White (1884-1945) was born at "Edinglassie" on 8th May, 1884, educated at Miss McCauley's School, Darling Point, and afterwards at The Armidale School, Armidale. He married Ruth Ethel Suttor, second daughter of Norman Lachland Suttor, of Bathurst, in 1911. When James died he left two sons and one daughter, Mr. James Suttor White ("Coneac," Gloucester), Flight-Lieut. Peter Brook White, of the R.A.A.F., who has been serving abroad for over three years, and who, it is understood, would shortly be returning home, and Mrs. Fred Moses (Willow Tree). He also leaves two brothers and two sisters, viz., Messrs Allan and Bruce White ("Tucka Tucka," Yetman), Mrs. L. Dutton (Guyra), and Miss Ruth White (Muswellbrook)(from 1945 obituary).

James was prominently associated with the pastoral industry. In 1903 he took up a selection known as ''Ward's Mistake," Guyra, remaining there until 1906, when he took up a position as jackeroo and later manger at "Tucka Tucka." He carried on duties at 'Tucka Tucka" until his father's death in 1927, then came to Muswellbrook to take over the control of "Edinglassie," where he continued to maintain the famous Aberdeen-Angus Stud, established by his father in 1886. The late Mr. White was a director of White Bros. Pty. Ltd., Gulf Cattle Country, Schute Bell, Badgery and Lumby, Limited, share holder in Texas. Estates Pty. Ltd. and Pastoral Investments ..Ltd. (Queensland). Up till a few years ago it was Mr. White's practice to make a trip each year to the Northern Territory for the purpose of making an inspection of the Brunette Downs property. The long trip was made by motor car until in later years the journey was undertaken by aeroplane. Deceased was also a director of Mt. Everest Casolin Pty. Ltd. and Mt. Everest Manufacturing Co. (ibid, 1945)

James White had a notable public career. After taking up residence in Muswellbrook in 1927 he followed his father's footsteps, assuming leadership of various local organisations. It was not long before he was elected to the Shire Council, and in 1935 elected President, holding that office until 1941. At the time of his death he was a councillor for A. riding. He was a member of the Denman Singleton P.P. Board, and president of the Upper Hunter Pastoral and Agricultural Association, his father having, held the latter office for over 20 years. He was a member of the council of the Royal Agricultural Society. Again taking after his late father, succeeding to the chairmanship of The Brentwood Hospital, Muswellbrook, having held that office for 18 years. The White family has, throughout Muswellbrook 's history, taken a keen interest in the welfare of the hospital, and this was carried on by James White, who gave generously to ensure that the work of the institution would be carried on in a way to promote the welfare of patients. During his long term of office he and fellow directors initiated provision of a new hospital of a capacity of 80 beds and new nurses' quarters. The movement had reached the stage when the Hospitals' Commission had given its approval of the scheme.

The late Mr. White has bequeathed achieved outstanding results in the field of patriotic endeavor, was first president of the Patriotic Committee, and later vice president. He was a keen supporter of the Red Cross Society. He was a Shire Council representative on the Anzac House Memorial Committee. He was a firm friend of the Returned Soldiers' League, Patriotic Younger Set and Work Circle.

The children of the town and district will ever remember James, because due to the generosity of the family that it was possible for the Municipal Council to take over full control of the White Memorial Baths, established in the first instance with the substantial financial aid from James' father. When the undertaking subsequently became financially embarrassed both the Government and Messrs White Bros, waived all debts due to them in order to allow the baths to be re-opened and made available for public use.

He was a keen polo player, playing with Goondiwindi and Muswellbrook teams. He was a member of the Upper Hunter Amateur Race Club, Muswellbrook Patriotic Race Club, and of Sydney Cricket Ground. He was a keen supporter and member of the Muswellbrook Cricket and Brook Street Tennis Clubs.

James White was a great enthusiast for closer settlement, but to achieve that aim set out to press for water conservation, believing one of the main conditions for the success of closer settlement was assured water supplies. He was a member of the Presentation Board of the Diocese of Newcastle for the parish of Muswellbrook, and for a number of years a member of St. Alban's Vestry.

The large attendance of representatives of hospital, Local Government, professional and commercial interests at the funeral yesterday afternoon was a tribute to the memory of James White. The interment was made in the Church of England Cemetery, following a service held in the chapel conducted by the Rev. H. Hapden-Hobart, who also officiated at the graveside. The pall bearers were Mr. James White, junr. (son), Mr. Allan White, Mr. Bruce White (brothers), Mr. Fred Moses, (son in-law), Mr. Les. Dutton (brother in law) and Mr John Davies (Obituaries Australia, Ntnl.Ctre.for Biography, ANU, entry for 'White, James (1884-1945)', accessed online, 10/12/2019).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Plains and plateaux supporting human activities-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Private farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Growing vines and maintaining vineyards-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Experimenting with new breeds of animal-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Ancillary structures - wells, cisterns-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and parklands of distinctive styles-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and gardens of domestic accommodation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Mining-Activities associated with the identification, extraction, processing and distribution of mineral ores, precious stones and other such inorganic substances. Mining for coal-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Mining-Activities associated with the identification, extraction, processing and distribution of mineral ores, precious stones and other such inorganic substances. coal transport and handling-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Livestock structures-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Pastoral and Agricultural Associations-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Sheep farming for wool-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Modifying landscapes to increase productivity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Sheep farming for lamb and mutton-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Technology-Activities and processes associated with the knowledge or use of mechanical arts and applied sciences Technologies for reticulated water supply-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Homes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. early settlement or worker's cottage-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Pastoral Homestead-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing famous families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing farming families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing for farm and station hands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Administering and alienating Crown lands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Expressing lines of early grant allotments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early farming (sheep grazing)-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - administration of land-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - conserving cultural and natural heritage-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian Italianate-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (late)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Edwardian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Victorian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century interwar-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. work of stonemasons-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Country estates - visiting, enjoying-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ornamental Garden-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Outdoor relief-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going hunting and shooting-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Activities associated with relaxation and recreation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Horse riding-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Leisure-Includes tourism, resorts.
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Developing local clubs and meeting places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Places of informal community gatherings-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Hon. Francis John (Frank) White MLA, grazier, politician-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James White (Jr.), grazier, racehorse breeder, politician-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James White (Jr.), grazier, racehorse breeder, politician-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Hon. James Cobb White MLC, grazier, politician-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James White (1884-1945), grazier, philanthropist-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James White, Hunter Valley pastoralist-

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentBHP Billiton submits CMP for Edinglassie & Rous Lench Homesteads  
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2) OF THE HERITAGE ACT 1977

Standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977.

I, Donald Harwin, the Special Minister of State pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales do by this Order, effective 1 December 2020:

1. revoke the order made on 11 July 2008 and published on pages 91177 to 9182 of Government Gazette Number 110 of 5 September 2008 and varied by notice published in the Government Gazette on 5 March 2015; and

2. grant the exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 that are described in the attached Schedule.

Donald Harwin
Special Minister of State
Signed this 9th Day of November 2020.

To view the standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 click on the link below.
Nov 13 2020

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0017002 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0017002 Dec 83 1675449
State Environmental Planning PolicyHunter REP 1989 03 Nov 89 1079350
National Trust of Australia register Edinglassie Including gardens, curtilage and adjoi403323 Jun 80   
Register of the National Estate - Interim 00134   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Section 170 register199842Pacific Power  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenHansen Bailey2007Bengalla Mining Company European Heritage Management Plan
WrittenHeritas (Linda Babic); Mayne-Wilson & Associates2013Edinglassie - Conservation Management Plan
WrittenTropman & Tropman, Architects1993Edinglassie & Rous Lench - preliminary Conservation Management Plan

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage NSW
Database number: 5045625
File number: S90/05833 & HC 32464


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