Linsley Terrace | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Linsley Terrace

Item details

Name of item: Linsley Terrace
Other name/s: Major House
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: Terrace
Location: Lat: -33.8561721734 Long: 151.2073910850
Primary address: 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35 Lower Fort Street, Millers Point, NSW 2000
Parish: St Philip
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT46 DP826364
LOT47 DP826364
LOT48 DP826364
LOT49 DP826364
LOT50 DP826364
LOT51 DP826364
LOT58 DP826364
LOT59 DP826364
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35 Lower Fort StreetMillers PointSydneySt PhilipCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
 Private 
Department of HousingState Government 
Saatvic Holdings Pty LtdPrivate 

Statement of significance:

This group of terraces is historically significant as:

- the oldest extant terrace in Millers Point;
- an example of investment in residential property in Lower Fort Street during the early 1830s by a local publican for rent and as his own residence;
- its site and buildings were associated from the early 1820s with some of the earliest wharfage (early 1820s) at Millers Point owned by early merchants William Brown, T G Pittman and John Lamb;
- part of the historic building stock associated with the local community;
- it has the potential to contribute to an understanding of several phases of the development of Millers Point.

It has high aesthetic significance as:
- an example of early Victorian terraces.
- as a streetscape element, being part of the extraordinary collection of 19th century housing forms that make up the western side of Lower Fort Street. (DPWS, 2002).

This property is a group of two storey early nineteenth century terraces.

It is part of the Millers Point Conservation Area, an intact residential and maritime precinct. It contains residential buildings and civic spaces dating from the 1830's and is an important example of C19th adaptation of the landscape. (Tanner, 1986)

The house at 29 Lower Fort Street was built with its neighbours at Nos 25-27 and Nos 31-33 Lower Fort Street between 1833 and 1834. The present Nos 25 and 27 were originally a single house for George Morris, for whom the group (first known as Morris Place) was constructed. Morris departed for London in 1836, and his house was shortly afterwards subdivided into two separate dwellings. In 1868, following the death of Morris's widow, the group was sold to John Linsley. It became known as Linsley Terrace in 1873, probably about the time that the original single storey verandahs were replaced by the present two storey structures, with corresponding alterations to doors and windows. The properties were resumed by the Sydney Harbour Trust in 1900, and have been in Government ownership ever since. Between 1916 and 1918 the back yards of the group were curtailed and new outbuildings were added in conjunction with the construction of Hickson Road and the Walsh Bay wharves. The buildings were transferred to the NSW Housing Commission (later the NSW Department of Housing and subsequently the NSW Land and Housing Corporation) between 1983 and 1986. From 2008, a number of the properties were offered for long lease to the private sector, and Nos 31 and 33 were leased and subsequently adapted as single family residences.

The terrace at 25-33 Lower Fort Street is of State historic significance as the earliest extant terrace in Millers Point. It is an early example of investment in residential property and demonstrates a pattern of development (a house for the owner combined with a number of attached terrace dwellings to generate income) that was to become common in Millers Point and elsewhere in Sydney. The site also has associations with some of the earliest wharfage at Millers Point (early 1820s) owned by early merchants William Brown, T G Pitman and John Lamb. The houses are an integral part of Millers Point, the earliest residential precinct in Australia still in residential use today, which is of State and arguably national significance. They form an important visual component of this precinct, being highly visible from the water to both east and west, as well as from Hickson Road at the rear and at the termination of George Street north at the front. The buildings have high research potential, as they contain a considerable amount of fabric from the 1830s as well as from subsequent periods of construction, which is able to yield information on the design, construction and use of these buildings. All of the houses, including No 29, have high local social significance through their long relationship with the close-knit Millers Point community.
Date significance updated: 12 Jan 04
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Construction years: 1830-
Physical description: A two storey, five bedroom Georgian style terrace with basement and attic. Elegant iron lace and balcony supports, plus infilled balcony. Storeys: 2 Construction: Painted rendered masonry walls. Corrugated iron roof to main body of house and balcony. Timber and cast iron balcony. Style: Victorian Georgian

All the buildings in this group are four storeys high, with one storey below Lower Fort Street and one within the roof space. The main buildings appear to date from the early to mid 19th century. Lower ground floor main walls are of stone, and
main walls above this level are generally brick, rendered and painted externally at the front and painted only at the rear. Roofs are corrugated iron, painted, with evidence of close battening for shingles beneath. Front verandahs have painted
cast and wrought iron lace columns, balustrades and friezes, with timber beams and floors. At the front edge of the verandah floors, there is evidence of seatings for earlier timber posts that supported the original single-storey verandah.

There are generally two principal rooms per floor on the lower ground, ground and first floors, with a stair beside the rear (western) room on each floor. Ground floors and above are of timber, while the lower ground floors are mainly stone,
concrete or earth. Internal masonry walls are mostly plastered and painted. Original partition walls and ceilings are of lath-and-plaster, although these have been replaced in part with a variety of later materials including hardboard, plasterboard and fibre cement. Doors and windows are timber, mostly painted internally and externally. The front ground floor windows have a sliding top sash with no counterweights, but hinged timber flaps at the sides to stop the window half open. The bottom sashes are hung on cords and weights. This system was evidently used also for the rear windows on the ground floor that were subsequently converted to door openings, as the reveals show only a single pair of pulleys. Most front window frames have pockets where shutter hinges were formerly fixed. At the rear of the buildings, on lower ground level, are outbuildings containing bathrooms and laundries that are of face brick with concrete floors and timber framed roofs, windows and doors, and have galvanised steel roofs. These appear to date from the early 20th century.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
External: Good
Modifications and dates: External: Dormers removed. Balcony infilled. Joinery changed to balcony beams.
Current use: Boarding House
Former use: Residence

History

Historical notes: Millers Point is one of the earliest areas of European settlement in Australia, and a focus for maritime activities. This group of early nineteenth century terraces represent a significant streetscape element. First tenanted by Department of Housing in 1984.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Trading amongst the Australian colonies-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Trading between Australia and other countries-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building and maintaining jetties, wharves and docks-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing ship owners and maritime traders-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing single people in boarding houses-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing industrial workers-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing townsfolk - terraces and cottages-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working on the waterfront-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The houses at 25-33 Lower Fort Street, built in 1833-34, are the oldest extant terrace group in Millers Point, and demonstrate a pattern of development (a group of three or more houses including one more elaborate,built for the owner) that was to become typical. The only older group of buildings in Millers Point is the pair of houses at 21-23 Lower Fort Street, built 1832-34

These houses are associated with the first phase of residential development of the Millers Point area.

The buildings have been used for housing continuously since they were built.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
These buildings are associated with two prominent businessmen of early Sydney, George Morris and John Linsley, who successively gave their name to the group. They are also associated with the earliest wharfage in Millers Point, and the early merchants that owned it. Morris Place is typical of the significant role played by publicans in property development in 19th century Sydney. The buildings are also associated with the Sydney Harbour Trust and its successors that have owned and managed the place since 1900.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The terrace exhibits high levels of building craftsmanship, especially in the joinery of the former Morris house at 25-27 Lower Fort Street. The louvred partitions between front verandahs are rare items of their kind.

The terrace is part of the distinctive streetscape of Millers Point, and is located at the termination of George Street.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
This terrace has been home to successive generations of the Millers Point community.

The terrace has been part of the physical fabric of Millers Point since the 1830s.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
As the houses have been present on the site since the 1830s, and retain much of their original fabric, they have considerable potential to yield information on early life in Sydney as well as on the changes in building use and construction that have occurred since the 1830s.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The terrace is historically rare as the earliest terrace group surviving in Millers Point, and part of the earliest phase of residential
construction.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The terraces show design and constructional attributes that are fine examples of 19th century development in Millers Point.

The terrace is an early example of a pattern of development that was to become typical in Millers Point and elsewhere: progressive terrace development by an owner-occupier, with the building intended for the owner's residence being of superior construction and finish to the others.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Prepare a CMP for the terrace; restore interiors to the most intact of the group; open up first floor verandahs to the street façade.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsement29 Lower Fort Street - Conservaton management plan for 25-33 Lower Fort Street with preface for 29 Lower Fort Street. Jun 27 2014
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementCMP for 35 Lower Fort Street, Millers Point Apr 28 2016
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementCMP for 25-27 Lower Fort Street Feb 7 2018

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0090702 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Local Environmental PlanCSH LEP 4 07 Apr 00   
Register of the National Estate  21 Oct 80   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Department of Housing s170 Register1998 Brooks & Associates  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenHeritage Design Services, Department of Public Works & Services (DPWS)2002Conservation Management Guidelines: NSW Dept. of Housing properties Millers Point
WrittenHigginbotham, E.1991The Rocks & Millers Point Archaeological Management Plan
WrittenHoward Tanner & Associates1986Millers Point Conservation Study
WrittenLucas, Stapleton and Partners Pty201635 Lower Fort Street - Conservation Management Plan
WrittenOrwell & Peter Phillips2014MORRIS PLACE/LINSLEY TERRACE 25-33 LOWER FORT STREET MILLERS POINT JUNE 2014 - updated inventory record with SOS, description, detailed significance
WrittenOrwell & Peter Phillips2014MORRIS PLACE/LINSLEY TERRACE 25-33 LOWER FORT STREET MILLERS POINT
WrittenOrwell & Peter Phillips201429 Lower Fort Street as part of 25-33 Lower Fort Street - Conservation Management Plan

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045636
File number: EF14/5462


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