Bulletin Place Restaurant | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Bulletin Place Restaurant

Item details

Name of item: Bulletin Place Restaurant
Other name/s: San Francisco Restaurant
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Commercial
Category: Warehouse/storage area
Location: Lat: -33.8624783421 Long: 151.2094948860
Primary address: 6-8 Bulletin Place, Sydney, NSW 2000
Parish: St James
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOTB DP110204
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
6-8 Bulletin PlaceSydneySydneySt JamesCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
A J Richardson Properties Pty LtdPrivate 

Description

Construction years: 1880-
Physical description: Three storey brick Victorian Free Classical style building. This building is one of three former adjacent warehouses in Bulletin Place. It is built of loadbearing brickwork, finished in stucco lined to simulate ashlar and decorated in a Free Classical manner and painted. The symmetrical facade is embraced by slender pilasters with debased Corinthian capitals, topped by a parapet treated as an entablature with a bracketed frieze. The floor levels are marked by string courses embellished with paterae. Windows are double hung sashes with bracketed stone sills. The wide doorway (original loading doorway) has a segmented arch head with stone impost blocks. The roughly finished north-west end wall indicates where this building continued as part of 2 Bulletin Place, now demolished. The internal structure, three bays wide and two bays deep, has chamfered timber storey posts, girders and joists. The roof is supported on posts tenoned into a beam. The ceiling is lined with boards and there is a single rooflight. There is a timber stair of two flights. Category:Individual Buildings. Style:Victorian Free Classical. Storeys:3. Facade:Painted Stucco; Timber Framed Windows & Doors. Side/Rear Walls:Painted Brick. Internal Walls:Painted Brick; Timber Studs with Plasterboard. Roof Cladding:Inaccessible but believed to be corrugated steel. Internal Structure:Timber posts & girders. Floor:Timber joists. Roof:Timber rafters. Ceilings:Lining boards; plasterboard. Stairs:Timber. Sprinkler System:Yes. Lifts:No. General Details:This building is in good condition, externally and internally. The survival of this building and two adjacent warehouses, all on shallow sites in a narrow street, retains a tiny part of an historic streetscape. Internally the timber posts and some of the girders are still visible, although interior fittings and surfaces have in recent years been adapted for use as a souvenir shop (LEP, 2005)
Modifications and dates: Intrusive Elements:Illuminated vertical projecting and wall signs.
Current use: souvenir sales offices
Former use: Aboriginal land, town lot, warehouse, restaurant

History

Historical notes: The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters.

With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney (sourced from Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani ).

The street marks the side boundaries of allotments which first appeared on James Meehan's map of 1807, sloping down to the Tank Stream from the street that became Macquarie Place.

The site was part of the grant of 1 acre 37 - 1/2 roods made by Governor Macquarie to Andrew Thompson on 1 January 1810. It seems that Mary Reibey, one of the best known early merchants, also owned the land at one time (LEP, 2005). Thompson was a wealthy emansibipst merchant and a favourite of the then Governor, Captain Bligh. When he died in september 1818, the land was sold to William Browne, a Sydney merchant, for 1075 pounds. He sold it to Prosper de Mestre in 1828 for 2100 pounds. De Mestre was a prominent mercantile and public figure, but later fell into financial trouble in the early 1840s depression. The land was taken from him and sold to an Eleanor Terry who let it to tenants.

The first reference to 'Bulletin Place' was in Sands Sydney Directory in 1867, when it was described as a lane. By 1870 it had been upgraded into a passageway, and in 1890 it was recorded as Bulletin Place. Bulletin Place is the only Sydney thoroughfare named after a publication, for it was here that J F Archibald's famous weekly "The Bulletin" was published for many years following its foundation in 1880 (LEP, 2005). The Bulletin owned stores and offices at the intersection of the passageway with Pitt Street. Bulletin Place is situated on land reclaimed from the mouth of the historic Tank Stream, which today runs underneath Pitt Street. The Bulletin remained in this location until 1897, when it moved to newer and larger offices in George Street (Sing, 1988).

The warehouse was erected before 1880, it appears in Percy Dove's Sydney map of that year. Its basic form suggests an earlier date of construction. From 1880 to 1884 it was occupied by Mrs Eliza Tinsley, ironmonger. Merchant brothers Mahlon Clarke and Thomas Cowlishaw acquired the property in March 1888 from Edward Terry. The Cowlishaw Bros. were heavily involved in the coal trade. A c1920s photo indicates that this building was part of a larger warehouse that extended to Pitt Street demolished in 1965 for the construction of Export House (LEP, 2005).

Other companies which have occupied the warehouses along Bulletin Place are: Sandy & Co. Glass, Oil & Colour Stores; Chard Marshall; J.C.Steel Tanners; Harrison & Whitton Skin & Produce Merchants; and the Sydney Volcanic Aerated Water Company (Sing, 1988).

In later years it was used for a variety of purposes including manufacturing and commercial operations, and in the 1960s became a restaurant and cocktail bar. Its facade was restored in 1973. Northbourne Developments bought the three Bulletin Place warehouse properties 6-8, 10-12 and 14-18 in 1986 (LEP, 2005). In 1988 they renovated these three warehouses using Clive Lucas, Stapleton & Partners heritage consultants) and constructed a $150million dollar retail and office complex on the corfner adjoining Macquarie Place development at the end of the street on the corner of Macquarie Place. The major development complex was due for completion in March 1990. The oldest building (16-18 Bulletin Place) leased to Len Evans Wine Co.) was established around 1895 as a two storey warehouse belonging to Austin's Stores. The second-oldest (6-8 Bulletin Place) leased by Bulletin Place restaurant) was originally owned by Elliot Bros. Druggists and then beame the premises of Tinsley Ironmonger. The third warehouse, is 10-14 Bulletin Place, on the corner of Pitt Street, (leased to the Len Evans Wine Company) was established around 1895 as a two storey warehouse belonging to Austin & Co.. Sydney City Council paved both Bulletin Place and Macquarie Place turning them into pedestrian walkways (Sing, 1988).

Its present use as a souvenir business commenced in 1993 (LEP, 2005).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Warehousing and storage for commercial enterprises-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Developing Commercial Enterprise-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Naming places (toponymy)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Macquarie's town layout-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Early Sydney Street-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Laneway-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing ports-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Artists settlement and networks-

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act covers building,land,maintenance


Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
The maintenance of any building or item on the sites meaning the continuous protective care of existing materials.
Dec 22 1989
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2) OF THE HERITAGE ACT 1977

Standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977.

I, Donald Harwin, the Special Minister of State pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales do by this Order, effective 1 December 2020:

1. revoke the order made on 11 July 2008 and published on pages 91177 to 9182 of Government Gazette Number 110 of 5 September 2008 and varied by notice published in the Government Gazette on 5 March 2015; and

2. grant the exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 that are described in the attached Schedule.

Donald Harwin
Special Minister of State
Signed this 9th Day of November 2020.

To view the standard exemptions for engaging in or carrying out activities / works otherwise prohibited by section 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 click on the link below.
Nov 13 2020

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0065102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0065122 Dec 89 124 
Local Environmental PlanSydney Local Environmental Plan 09 Dec 05   
National Trust of Australia register  610501 Nov 82   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
National Trust Suburban Register19866105National Trust of Australia (NSW)  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenSing, Tricia1988"Bulletin Place: a new retail/commercial drawcard - Reminder of early Sydney

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage NSW
Database number: 5045669
File number: S90/04406 & HC 89/1130


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