Meroogal | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Meroogal

Item details

Name of item: Meroogal
Type of item: Built
Location: Lat: -34.8754498035 Long: 150.5926834280
Primary address: 35 West Street, Nowra, NSW 2541
Parish: Nowra
County: St Vincent
Local govt. area: Shoalhaven
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Nowra
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOTF DP412255
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
35 West StreetNowraShoalhavenNowraSt VincentPrimary Address
Worrigee StreetNowraShoalhavenNowraSt VincentAlternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Historic Houses Trust of NSWGeneral17 Sep 97

Statement of significance:

Meroogal is of outstanding cultural significance. The property, together with associated documents and the recollections of people associated with it, provides a remarkable opportunity to understand and demonstrate aspects of the relationships between a family and its individual members and their material culture. The primary significance of Meroogal is as an artefact of history and its evidence of the lives of four generations of one family who lived in the house, their history and its evidence of taste and circumstances. (Walker 1986: 36, Watts 1987)
Date significance updated: 02 Oct 97
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Kenneth Mackenzie
Builder/Maker: Kenneth Mackenzie
Construction years: 1886-1886
Physical description: Meroogal is a late Victorian, two storey weatherboard cottage with verandahs and balconies on two similar street frontages and includes a servants wing. The walls are weatherboard on stone foundations and the roof of corrugated iron. Internally the floors are original hardwood and the joinery cedar. The building features elaborate bargeboards, cast iron balustrades on timber verandahs and balconies, arched window sashes and french doors and dormer windows in two sides. The internal walls are wallpapered , the ceilings panelled, doors four panelled and the staircase is cedar. The joinery throughout is painted and the fire places and mantels are cast iron.

Upstairs there are lining boards on the walls and ceiling and four bedrooms, two with timber balconies and cast iron fire places.

The servants wing consists of three rooms and a verandah and is connected to the kitchen by a short covered way.

The house is surrounded by a picket fence with gates on each street front. Shaded by two large jacaranda trees (J.mimosifolia), Meroogal's garden layout is edged with glazed border tiles. (Brown 1977)

Since HHT acquisition, it was decided to restore the garden to its appearance in the late 1920s, which was largely unchanged from its original form. The fences and flowerbeds have been reconstructed and a host of perennial and annual plants have been re-introduced into the garden. In spring roses mix with Iris, stocks, larkspurs and love-in-a-mist (Nigella damascena) in the beds. White blossoms on the Damson plum trees (for jam), old 'California Crown' apple and 'Williams' pear, and later purple jacarandas make a great show in the garden. The garden is now about 1/10 of the size of the original one hectare allotment(HHT, Spring 2005)
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical Condition - Good
Date condition updated:17 Sep 97
Modifications and dates: 1886 - 1936 - Painting and decoration most frequent, house was originally on just over one hectare allotment (HHT, Spring 2005)
c1890s -- New kitchen and lumber room added
c1909 - Planting of Jacaranda trees (Jacaranda mimosaefolia)
1912 - Telephone facilities added
c1912 - Town water connected
1916 - Cottage named Kintore built for the Macgregors
1939 - Sewerage connected and necessary alterations made.
c1939 - earth closet beyond the servant's wing demolished
1941-59 1 hectare allotment subdivided, losing parts of the garden. Flower garden and back yard retained.(HHT, Spring 2005)
Post 1950 - Current decorative finishes are added.
1958 - Gas connected and necessary alterations made
c1977 - Kintore cottage destroyed by fire.
c1980 - stables demolished
1984 - reconstruction of new picket fence similar, but not identical, to the old.
(Walker 1986: 20 & 25)

Since HHT acquisition, it was decided to restore the garden to its appearance in the late 1920s, which was largely unchanged from its original form. The fences and flowerbeds have been reconstructed and a host of perennial and annual plants have been re-introduced into the garden. In spring roses mix with Iris, stocks, larkspurs and love-in-a-mist in the beds. White blossoms on the Damson plum trees (for jam), old California Crown apple and Williams pear, and later purple jacarandas make a great show in the garden. (HHT, Spring 2005)
Current use: House Museum
Former use: Aboriginal land, peri-urban residence

History

Historical notes: Meroogal was constructed in 1886 for occupation by Mrs Jessie Catherine Thorburn, a widow, and her four unmarried daughters. It was a modest building in comparison to the grand late 19th century houses in Sydney, but quite grand compared to other residences in Nowra. The only properties of significantly greater value were banks and hotels. Finance for the project was provided by her eldest son, Robert Taylor Thorburn. He appears to have had the available funds due to his partnership in a goldmine at Yalwal, 26 kilometres south west of Nowra. Her brother Kenneth Mackenzie designed the house. Kenneth Mackenzie probably built or at least supervised Meroogal's construction as well as he had designed and built several buildings at Cambewarra, eight kilometres north west of Nowra. The house stood on an original allotment of just over one hectare. (HHT, Spring 2005)

The impetus for building Meroogal appears to have been the marriage of Robert Taylor Thorburn and the family's desire to move to town for business and social reasons.

Thorburn married Jessie Billis in 1885 and bought the land for Meroogal in September that year. When Meroogal was completed in May 1886 the family moved from their property, Barr Hill, to Nowra. Jessie Catherine and her daughters went to Meroogal and Thorburn and his wife went to another house in Nowra. Barr Hill was let to a share farmer.

Between 1886 and 1900 the occupants of the house temporarily changed. However, by 1900 the occupants were the same as those who had moved in originally, Jessie Catherine and her four daughters - Annabella Jane (Miss Belle), Georgina Isabella (Miss Georgie), Jessie Catherine (Miss Kate) and Fanny Kennina (Miss Tottie).

In 1914 a substantial portion of what was then Lot 5 was resumed to provide an additional water reservoir for Nowra. This was the first of several lots to be sold, transforming the original 5 acre property to what is now far less than half the size. The majority of original Meroogal land has now been developed for urban use.

In 1916 Jessie Catherine died. In the same year her second daughter Mary Susan Macgregor and her husband came to live in Kintore, the cottage built for their retirement on Meroogal land. The two families associated daily and ate together regularly.

The site of the cottage built in 1916 is vacant following a fire which destroyed it in the mid 1970s.

Between 1916 and 1939 numerous family members and other visitors came to stay at Meroogal, some for lengthy periods of time. During this period two of the original four sisters died and Mary Macgregor moved into Meroogal, leasing Kintore to tenants. When Miss Kate died in 1940 the remaining sister, Miss Tottie went to live with relatives and did not return to Meroogal. This left Helen Macgregor, Mary Macgregor's daughter who had moved to Meroogal in 1930, as the principal occupant from 1945 until 1969. Her sisters were regular visitors. Her sister Elgin came to live there in 1971 and remained there until 1977.

In the mid 1920s the Thorburn sisters maintained the ordered household regime developed in the 19th century, with tasks divided between them. The Thorburns and Macgregors all led active social lives through their family and friends and their activities with local organisations. Yet despite the mixing of Thorburns and Macgregors and the generations, there were differences between them and these are remembered by the living members of the families. The personalities and interests of the women who occupied and ran Meroogal are evident in these recollections, the fabric of the building and changes to it, the furniture and contents of the house and the remaining personal belongings. These include diaries, scrap books, work books and other items.

From the late 1940s there has been a succession of tenants sharing the house with the Macgregors, with the two rear bedrooms used by the tenants. The sequence and nature of this is unclear.

Between 1941 and 1959 the original one hectare allotment was subdivided, losing parts of the garden. The flower garden and back yard were retained. (HHT, Spring 2005)

From 1978 until mid 1985 Meroogal was used by June Wallace, Mary Macgregor's grandaughter, her children and some other Macgregor descendants as a holiday house.

The property is now owned by the NSW Government's Historic Houses Trust and open to the public on appointed days as a house museum.

THE CONTENTS
The contents of Meroogal embody many family ties and associations together with unconscious and self-conscious decisions to dispose of some possessions and keep others. Although the furniture has changed substantially, the rooms retain the flavour of Victorian period decoration, particularly in relation to paintings, pictures and photographs. The contents and furnishings include items from each generation of occupants and include items originally brought from Barr Hill.

Between 1946 and 1977 many pieces of furniture and other contents were sold or given away. It is also likely that when Kintore was let to tenants in 1948 some of the valued furniture and contents were moved to Meroogal and elsewhere. When the cottage was sold in 1959 the remaining furniture was brought to Meroogal and/or sold.


THE GARDEN
The house stood on an original allotment of just over one hectare. (HHT, Spring 2005)

The garden was a source of pride to the Thorburns and the Macgregors, the latter winning a prize in the Sydney Morning Herald garden Competition in the 1960s. A remanant of the 1920s orchard fence and gate remains.(Walker 1986:7-27)

Between 1941 and 1959 the original one hectare allotment was subdivided, losing parts of the garden. The flower garden and back yard were retained. (HHT, Spring 2005)

Since HHT acquisition, it was decided to restore the garden to its appearance in the late 1920s, which was largely unchanged from its original form. The fences and flowerbeds have been reconstructed and a host of perennial and annual plants have been re-introduced into the garden. In spring roses mix with Iris, stocks, larkspurs and love-in-a-mist in the beds. White blossoms on the Damson plum trees (for jam), old California Crown apple and Williams pear, and later purple jacarandas make a great show in the garden. (HHT, Spring 2005)

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Significant Places How are significant places marked in the landscape by, or for, different groups-Monuments and Sites
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Mining-Activities associated with the identification, extraction, processing and distribution of mineral ores, precious stones and other such inorganic substances. (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing townsfolk - terraces and cottages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Owning and occupying a house-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Villa-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing ordinary families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Victorian era residence-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Gentlemens Villas-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Townships-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Resuming private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing the social life of a rural community-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Garden-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Rural Estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages A quiet Rural District-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Villa-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Edwardian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Victorian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century interwar-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian gardenesque style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian (late)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Valuing women's contributions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Physical evidence of creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses, through domestic artefacts scatters, ar-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living and working at home-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation musical gatherings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to a museum-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Developing collections of items-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Community volunteering-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Developing clubs for social improvement-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups (none)-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Jesse Gregson, A.A. Company manager-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Kenneth Mackenzie, architect and builder-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Robert Taylor Thorburn, miner-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Annabella Jane (Miss Belle) Thorburn-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Georgina Isabella (Miss Georgie) Thorburn-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Jessie Catherine (Miss Kate) Thorburn-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Fanny Kennina (Miss Tottie) Thorburn-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Helen McGregor-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Elgin McGregor-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with June Wallace-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Bauerlen, plant collector, botanist, author-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Baron Ferdinand von Mueller, Victorian Government Botanist-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Gertrude Lovegrove, botanical artist-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Meroogal is historically significant for:
- its evidence of 19th century Nowra and association with several prominent families in the district
(Walker 1986:36)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Meroogal is aesthetically significant for:
- its substantial contribution to the townscape of Nowra.
- its skilful design demonstrating the adaption of ideas from America.
(Walker 1986:36, Watts 1987)
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
Meroogal is significant for:
- its evidence of, and ability to demonstrate, the life and role of women in the late 19th and the 29th century.
- its potential to demonstrate aspects of domestic and family life in the period from it construction to 1956.
- its evidence of a substantial town house with ancillary uses.
(Walker 1986: 36)
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
A rare example of the continuance and adaption of Victorian taste within a house of the same period. (Walker 1986:36)
Integrity/Intactness: The most intact collection of Victorian period furniture, and other related house contents known in an urban area in NSW. (Walker 1986: 36)
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

The management of the house must respect the conservation requirements of the building and its contents. Conservation restraints must take place over visitor management and interpretation requirements. (Watts 1987)

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions HERITAGE ACT 1977

ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2)

I, the Minister for Planning, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, in pursuance of section 57(2) of the Heritage Act, 1977, do, by this my order:
(1) revoke the existing exemptions made to the Historic Houses Trust under section 57(2) of the Heritage Act; and
(2) under section 57(2) of the Heritage Act grant an exemption from all section 57(1) activities to properties owned or managed by the Historic Houses Trust and listed on the State Heritage Register as outlined in Schedule A with the following conditions:
(a) that the Historic Houses Trust provide an annual report to the Heritage Council on future works proposed for its properties;
(b) that the Historic Houses Trust advise the Heritage Office archaeologists of any proposed works requiring major excavation at its properties to allow due consideration of the need for additional archaeological work;
(c) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must lodge all archaeological monitoring or excavation reports prepared with the Heritage Office library on completion after review by Heritage Office archaeologists;
(d) that the Historic Houses Trust employ as required a consultant historical archaeologist with appropriate archaeological qualifications, knowledge, skills and experience and the Director of the HHT must obtain the advice of that person about the heritage significance of the archaeological resource and/or the impact of the development proposal on the heritage significance of the archaeological resource, and take that advice into account;
(e) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must take into account as far as practicable the cumulative effect of approvals on the heritage significance of the item and on the heritage resource of its area;
(f) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must ensure that approvals are in accordance with any requirements, guidelines, regulations and general conditions issued by the Heritage Council. The Director of the Historic Houses Trust may impose additional conditions which do not conflict with any Heritage Council conditions.

The Hon Frank Sartor MP
Minister for Planning
Minister for Redfern Waterloo
Minister for the Arts

11 April 2008

SCHEDULE A

Item State Heritage Register Listing Number

1. Elizabeth Farm 00001
2. Rouse Hill House 00002
3. Elizabeth Bay House 00006
4. Glenfield Farm, Casula 00025
5. Hyde Park Barracks and The Mint 00190
6. Exeter Farm (Meurant's Cottage) 00205
7. The Rose Seidler House 00261
8. Wentworth Mausoleum 00622
9. Justice and Police Museum 00673
10. Meroogal, Nowra 00953
11. Vaucluse House 00955
12. Government House, Sydney 01070
13. First Government House Site (Museum of Sydney) 01309
14. Susannah Place 01310
Apr 24 2008
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0095302 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Regional Environmental PlanIllawarra REP No.1 11 Apr 86   
Register of the National Estate  25 Aug 81   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCurran, Helen2016'A garden of memory: Meroogal'
TourismHistoric Houses Trust2004Meroogal, Historic Houses Trust Tourism Website View detail
WrittenHistoric Houses Trust2005Garden at Meroogal
WrittenHughes, Joy and Walker, Meredith, photography by Keith Gillett and John Storey1988Meroogal, Nowra : a history and a guide
WrittenMartin, Megan2016'The Lost Publication'
TourismTourism NSW2007Meroogal View detail
WrittenWalker, Meredith Meroogal : 35 West Street, Nowra, NSW : a conservation plan

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045719
File number: S90/03398; S96/00465 [S170]


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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