Glenalvon | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Glenalvon

Item details

Name of item: Glenalvon
Other name/s: Glenalvon and Stables
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Location: Lat: -34.0675188292 Long: 150.8148812860
Primary address: 8 Lithgow Street, Campbelltown, NSW 2560
Parish: St Peter
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Campbelltown
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Tharawal
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP34658
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
8 Lithgow StreetCampbelltownCampbelltown St PeterCumberlandPrimary Address
Carberry LaneCampbelltownCampbelltown St PeterCumberlandAlternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Department of Planning and InfrastructureState Government 

Statement of significance:

Glenalvon is historically, aesthetically and socially significant as one of the oldest urban townhouses in the township of Campbelltown. The house and stables of Glenalvon are a significant landmark element. Glenalvon has been used continuously as a residence for almost 160 years and although some changes have been made to the house, much of the original fabric, dating from 1840, has survived intact. The landscape setting of the house is also important as it represents part of the original curtilage of the property and makes a major contribution to the historic townscape of Campbelltown.
Date significance updated: 27 Nov 98
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Unknown
Builder/Maker: Michael Byrne
Construction years: 1841-1841
Physical description: Garden:
The house is set in a mature garden, which contains some historic plantings including tall columnar Cook's pine (Araucaria columnaris), silky oak (Grevillea robusta) and Californian desert fan palm (Washingtonia robusta).

House:
A two storey Georgian finely cut sandstone residence with symmetrical facade. The front verandah is stone flagged and is supported by turned stone Doric style columns. The hipped roof, originally shingled, is now clad in corrugated iron. The main entrance is located centrally on the southern elevation and double verandah posts on either side emphasise the point of entry. There are shuttered French doors either side of the main entry, opening onto the verandah. The five windows to the upper floor are double hung, timber sashed and of 9 panes to both the upper and lower sashes. The rear of the house has a verandah supported by flat timber columns. To the rear (north) of the house is located the former stables consisting of a symmetrical rectangular sandstone building with central gable on the eastern facade containing the entry doors and loft doors above. The hipped and gabled roof is clad in corrugated iron sheeting and has decorative timber barge boards. The roof framings were noted in 1973 as being jointed, dowelled, pegged and numbered without the use of nails (NT Listing). The verandah and eaves have timber soffits. Cellars are located below the house.

Interior:
original cedar joinery, inc. six panelled doors, splayed panelled jambs to the windows and chimney pieces to the first floor; marble ground floor chimney pieces with sandstone mantlepieces; original geometric stair.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
The building and grounds are in excellent condition, having undergone extensive conservation works in1969. The property has been very well maintained since that time, although the garden is currently somewhat overgrown.
Date condition updated:01 Feb 99
Modifications and dates: 1969 - conservation and restoration of the building and grounds.
Further information: The site is currently being evaluated through the preparation of a detailed conservation plan. A CMP has been finalised and endorsed by HC on 24/7/2000.
Current use: Residence
Former use: Residence

History

Historical notes: The outline of the house is first shown on two town plans dated November 1840, although the stables are not shown at this time. It is thought that Michael Byrne, a publican, built the house around this time on the grant of 1 acre and 32 perches which was taken up in 1831. Although it is possible that the outbuildings were not shown, it is more likely that the stables were constructed later (which would be supported by the differing styles of the two buildings).

Michael Byrne was born in County Wicklow, near Dublin in 1800, the son of Hugh and Sarah Byrne. Hugh Byrne was convicted without trial and transported to Australia, with his family, in 1802 for treasonous practices in the 1798 Irish Rebellion. Michael Byrne was made an apprentice to Lawrence Butler, Irish overseer of the Government Lumber Yards, Sydney. Michael Byrne went on to own seven pubs in Campbelltown. He was trialled, though not found guilty, of kicking a man to death for non-payment of a debt. Byrne himself was made insolvent in 1844, after having built (in 1841 - Lucas & McGinnes, 2012) Glenalvon, the finest stone house in the town. He died in 1878 and is buried in the Irish corner of the Roman Catholic Cemetery in Campbelltown (Oakman, W., in Broadbent, Clarke & Oakman, 2008).

By the 1840s various members of the Byrne family were experiencing financial difficulties, including Michael who by 1844 owed his brother-in-law, John Keighran (publican) the sum of 880 pounds 17s 3d. As partial payment of the debt John accepted the property in Lithgow Street and a 36 acre farm also owned by Byrne. Keighran is believed to have taken up residence in Glenalvon, along with his wife Catherine Byrne, sometime in 1853. They would eventually have thirteen children there. Upon the death of both parents little more than a year apart in 1858, the property passed to two of their sons John and Patrick.

The property was mortgaged to pay the debts of the estate and the house was let to J. Kidd, JP, who remained in tenancy until 1878 when the property was sold to the Fieldhouse brothers. The Fieldhouse brothers were prominent businessmen in Campbelltown who owned over 44 properties within the town by 1884. From 1878-1891 "Glenalvin Hall" was the residence of Edwin Fieldhouse and his family. From 1891-1904 the property remained in the joint ownership of the brothers at the end of which time they divided their assets with Edwin retaining Glenalvon (Lot 91). Edwin vacated the house shortly after and it was variously tenanted until 1920 when it was sold to the Bursill Family.

Glenalvon remained in the ownership of the Bursill family until 1965 when it was acquired by the (then) State Planning Authority (SPA) for $35,000 (Lucas interview, 2011).

In 1969 architect John Fisher (member of the Institute of Architects, the Cumberland County Council Historic Buildings Committee and on the first Council of the National Trust of Australia (NSW) after its reformation in 1960) was commissioned by the State Planning Authority to restore the first five houses in Campbelltown, which had been resumed under the Cumberland County Planning Scheme. They included Glenalvon (Lucas & McGinness, 2012).

In 1970 the house and stables were restored by Clive Lucas at Fisher Jackson and Hudson and Lucas recalls this property as the conservation project where he first used the then innovative heritage principle of researching and understanding the fabric of a place before attempting conservation, including the use of paint scrapes to establish original paint schemes (Lucas interview, 2011). The house was tenanted by the Oakham family from 1970 to 2010 and the stables are used as a resource centre by the Campbelltown and Airds District Historical Society.

The State Planning Authority sold Glenalvon to Campbelltown City Council and the Campbelltown & Airds District Historical Society now manage the building and garden, running displays, meetings, events (Nicholas, pers.comm., 8/10/2013).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. gentlemen's residences-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Townships-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Housing-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Demonstrating Governor Macquarie's town and landscape planning-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Gentlemens Villas-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - conserving cultural and natural heritage-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing museums-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. resumption for heritage conservation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Georgian revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - 20th century post WW2-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ornamental Garden-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to a Club-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Developing and maintaining a local museum-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups (none)-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Michael Byrne, publican-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Michael Byrne, publican-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Glenalvon is of historical significance as one of the oldest uurban townhouses surviving in the township of Campbelltown. It is of further historical significance for it association with early and prominent families of the Campbelltown district and for its links to a way of life which has long since disappeared.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Glenalvon is of high aesthetic significance as a particularly fine Colonial Georgian sandstone residence retaining much of its 1840s fabric intact. The stables buildings are also of high aesthetic significance as are the grounds which give an indication of the early curtilage of the property. The house combined with its grounds are important as reminders of the setting of early town houses with their generously landscaped grounds. Both the building and grounds make a considerable contribution to the historic townscape of Campbelltown.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Glenalvon is of high social significance for its association with several prominent Campbelltown families and for its demonstration of the early pattern of life in the original township.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
Glenalvon is of high technical/research significance for its demonstration of colonial building techniques and for its use of local building materials and craftsmen, particularly the stonemasons, some of whom were convicts.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
Glenalvon is a rare surviving example of an 1840s townhouse to survive with much of its 1840s fabric and grounds intact, indicating the stature of such houses at the time of their construction.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Glenalvon is an excellent example of an 1840s townhouse in the Colonial Georgian style.
Integrity/Intactness: Glenalvon has survived with much of its significanct 1840s fabric intact and the original curtilage and setting of the property can still be interpreted. The property has high overall integrity.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Ongoing conservation and maintenance works as required by statutory planning controls, including conservation of the garden supervised by a specialist in historic garden conservation.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act General Maintenance. Refer to standard exemptions gazetted 23 October 1998.

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
(1) The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material.
(2) Garden maintenance including cultivation, pruning, weed control, the repair and maintenance of existing fences, gates and garden walls, and tree surgery but not extensive lopping.
Aug 7 1987
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementConservation Plan CMP endorsed by Heritage Council 24 July 2000 for a period of five years, expires 24 July 2005. Jul 24 2000
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0000402 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0000427 Apr 79 0571987
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register  11 Feb 99   
Cumberland County Council list of Historic Buildings 1961-67     
National Trust of Australia register Classified 01 Feb 74   
Register of the National Estate  21 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Campbelltown City Council Heritage Study199416Campbelltown City CouncilNot known Yes
s.170 Register DUAP1999 Paul Davies Pty Ltd  Yes
Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden, NSW2000 Morris, C., & Britton, G./NSW National Trust (for the Heritage Council of NSW)  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
TourismCampbelltown and Airds Historical Society2007Glenalvon View detail
WrittenHelen Proudfoot (ed)1977Colonial Buildings: Macarthur Growth Centre - Campbelltown Camden Appin
WrittenInterviewed by Bronwyn Hanna2011Oral history interview with Clive Lucas
WrittenLucas, Clive & McGinness, Mark2012'John Fisher - 1924-2012 - champion of the state's structures'
WrittenNicholas, Gerri2013personal communication (email 8/10/2013)
WrittenOakman, Warwick, in Broadbent, J., Clarke, S.&C. and Oakman, W.2008Furnishing the Colonial Bungalow
Management Plan (HC endorsed)Otto Cserhalmi & Partners Pty Ltd1999Glenalvon: a plan for its conservation and management
WrittenOtto Cserhalmi & Partners Pty Ltd1998Glenalvon: A Plan for its Conservation and Management

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5045750
File number: EF14/4525; S90/6168; H99/55


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