Jenner House | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Jenner House

Item details

Name of item: Jenner House
Other name/s: Fleet Club; Stramshall; Jenner Private Hospital; Kurragheen; Lugano
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Residential buildings (private)
Category: House
Location: Lat: -33.8678005976 Long: 151.2263019360
Primary address: 2 Macleay Street, Potts Point, NSW 2011
Parish: Alexandria
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: La Perouse
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT3 DP218946

Boundary:

19th century marine villa designed by Edmund Blacket and Thomas Rowe.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
2 Macleay StreetPotts PointSydneyAlexandriaCumberlandPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

The Jenner precinct demonstrates the lifestyle of the late 19th century residents of the Potts Point area, which was characterised by the beauty of its houses and grounds and the wealth of its residents. The north wing represents a rare and valuable example of the status of the house servants. The precinct is also significant because of its 40 year period as a private hospital and for its extensive association with the Navy and with the operations of Garden Island, one of the largest engineering undertakings in 20th century Australia.

Jenner (1871) represents a fine example of the domestic work of Edmund Blacket with interesting internal detailing by Blacket and his then employee Horbury Hunt. The building's second floor was the work of Thomas Rowe in 1877. The building represents the transition in architectural taste which took place in the second half of the 19th century with the lower two floors on the western facade exhibiting the Regency style, and elsewhere the more flamboyant asymmetrical characteristics of the 19th century Italianate villa.

The building also has a relationship with other 19th century marine villas of Bomera and Tarana and Elizabeth Bay House. The precinct is also potentially important in terms of historical archaeology both in the building fabric and remnant formal garden settings (Conservation Management Plan, 2001)

Jenner appears to be the only remaining garden of the once numerous fashionable 19th century villas on Pott's Point, as well as a fine example of a boldly designed late 19th century suburban garden (National Trust, 1981).
Date significance updated: 14 Feb 05
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Edmund Blacket; Thomas Rowe (second floor)
Construction years: 1871-1877
Physical description: Site and Garden:
The subject land (lot 3 DP218946, 1896 square metres) has frontage to Macleay Street and originally had a harbour frontage which was acquired for the construction of the Garden Island Dockyard in 1940.

The subject land has a frontage to Macleay Street and originally had a harbour frontage which was acquired for the construction of the Garden Island Dockyard in 1940. There are remnant walls of former outbuildings in the north-western part of the site. Adjoining development consists of eight and nine storey residential flat development.

The site also has a relationship with other 19th century marine villas of Bomera and Tarana to its north-west and Elizabeth Bay House to its south-east. The precinct is also potentially important in terms of historical archaeology both in the building fabric and remnant formal garden settings (Conservation Management Plan, 2001)

Jenner appears to be the only remaining garden of the once numerous fashionable 19th century villas on Pott's Point, as well as a fine example of a boldly designed late 19th century suburban garden (National Trust, 1981).

Gardens flank both sides of the house - on its west facing Macleay Street a 600 square metre forecourt front entry garden is dominated by a carriage loop and central lawn and fountain as its focus. A large evergreen magnolia/bull bay (M.grandiflora) is a feature of this garden. A single garage is located on one side of this forecourt.

To the east is a lower rear garden, also marked by a circular lawn (and former gravel walk), edged by a significant sandstone wall above a sandstone outcropping overlooking the adjacent Navy base. The top garden is broadly a sweep of lawn, inside a large circular shape and outside it flanked by shrubberies, with a view of Sydney Harbour and heads across it from the house (Wentworth Courier, amended by Stuart Read, 24/9/9).

A landscape assessment undertaken in 2006 identified a number of significant landscape features as follows:
*Magnolia grandiflora at front of Jenner;
*Line of Camellia sp.to the rear of property;
*Remnant Macleay Street perimeter wall;
*Semi-circular sandstone wall at the rear of garden;
*Sandstone escarpment adjacent to sandstone wall; and
*Sandstone flagging along southeast of site.

House:
Jenner House is a grand 19th century marine villa designed by Edmund Blacket (1871) and Thomas Rowe (third floor, 1877). It has interesting internal detailing by Blacket and his then employee Horbury Hunt.

The house has three levels plus a partial basement, a single storey detached 1920s garage in the south western corner of the site and remnant walls of former outbuildings in the north western part of the site. It has essentially 8 bedrooms, six bathrooms. It has polished timber floors, a huge multiple room cellar, high ceilings, solid sandstone foundation and capacious interiors (Wentworth Courier, 2009).

The building represents the transition in architectural taste which took place in the second half of the 19th century with the lower two floors on the western facade exhibiting the Regency style, and elsewhere the more flamboyant asymmetrical characteristics of the 19th century Italianate villa.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Archaeology
Although disturbed, the nature of the subject land does not preclude the presence of Aboriginal relics.

The Heritage Impact Statement states that all excavation in the vicinity of significant archaeological features be carried out by hand under the supervision of an archaeologist. The remains of the outbuildings in the western forecourt (former stables to Macleay Street) were identified in an archaeological assessment as being of high local significance. These results were supported by a later assessment undertaken in 2004.

Policy Recommendation 4 of the CMP states that the front area of the site (off Macleay Street) should be archaeologically tested while works to the eastern end of the site, internal works and works around the house should be monitored by the archaeologist. Archaeological remains associated with former structures on the site are likely to remain.
Modifications and dates: 1875: subdivision of Alexander Macleay's Elizabeth Bay Estate
1880-90: upper grassed terrace had a planting of shrubs around its periphery suggesting a circular grass shape within the terrace and defined on the periphery by a gravel path with an outer ring of sandstone edging and an inner band of low hedging with mass planted bed edged with terracotta tile edgings. Main paths leading from the central house steps curved to south and north, both with sandstone edging and later paved with bricks laid diagonally.
1915+ adaptation for private hospital use and residential use.
1920s-30s: three Magnolia trees located along southern boudnary of Macleay Street entrance fourcourt. Only one survives today. One close to Macleay Street may have been removed in the hospital era to construct a garage structure.

1940s: major portion of original eastern garden demolished when property resumed to allow construction of Garden Island Naval Dockyard complex. Eastern slopes demolished except for immediate sandstone ledge below the semi-circular stone retaining wall. Pathways leading around to stone-cut and concrete steps either sideo fthe grassed terace were terminated in a cut-stone overhang. The southern steps led to a circuitous path negotiating the broken landform of the foreshore slopes. The northern steps terminated in a brick-walled and corrugated iron gabled roof garden structure. The northern access appears to have been built in the Federation era (1880-1919) whilst the southern steps originally gave access to the garden house in the Late Victorian Period.
c.1941: The grassed terrace of the upper eastern garden was modified to accomodate a rectangular building presumably of wartime Naval use. The top pool/terrace has been significantly altered, especially with the construction of a building that was demolished between 1945 and 1952.
Current use: residence
Former use: Aboriginal land, residence

History

Historical notes: Aboriginal history:
The "Eora people" was the name given to the coastal Aborigines around Sydney. Central Sydney is therefore often referred to as "Eora Country". Within the City of Sydney local government area, the traditional owners are the Cadigal and Wangal bands of the Eora. There is no written record of the name of the language spoken and currently there are debates as whether the coastal peoples spoke a separate language "Eora" or whether this was actually a dialect of the Dharug language. Remnant bushland in places like Blackwattle Bay retain elements of traditional plant, bird and animal life, including fish and rock oysters. With the invasion of the Sydney region, the Cadigal and Wangal people were decimated but there are descendants still living in Sydney today. All cities include many immigrants in their population. Aboriginal people from across the state have been attracted to suburbs such as Pyrmont, Balmain, Rozelle, Glebe and Redfern since the 1930s. Changes in government legislation in the 1960s provided freedom of movement enabling more Aboriginal people to choose to live in Sydney (Anita Heiss, "Aboriginal People and Place", Barani: Indigenous History of Sydney City http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani).

The Aboriginal name for Potts Point is Derrawunn (Sydney City Council, 2019).

Darlinghurst Ridge /Woolloomooloo Hill:
In the 1830s the whole area from Potts Point to Kings Cross and up to Oxford Street was known as Darlinghurst- probably named in honour of Governor Ralph Darling (1824-31)'s wife, Eliza. The rocky ridge that extended inland from Potts Point was called Eastern or Woolloomooloo Hill from the early days of white settlement. The earliest grant of land on Woolloomooloo Hill was made to Judge-Advocate John Wylde in 1822. In 1830 Wylde sold six of his 11 acres on the Point to Joseph Hyde Potts, accountant to the Bank of NSW, after whom Potts Point is named.

By the late 1820s Sydney was a crowded, disorderly and unsanitary town closely settled around the Rocks and Sydney Cove, with a European population of around 12000. Governor Darling was receiving applications from prominent Sydney citizens for better living conditions. The ridge of Woolloomooloo Hill beckoned, offering proximity to town and incomparable views from the Blue Mountains to the heads of Sydney Harbour.

In 1828 Darling ordered the subdivision of Woolloomooloo Hill into suitable 'town allotments' for large residences and extensive gardens. He then issued 'deeds of grant' to select members of colonial society (in particular, his senior civil servants). The first 7 grants were issued in 1828, with the other allotments formally granted in 1831.

The private residences that were built on the grants were required to meet Darling's so-called 'villa conditions' which were possibly determined and overseen by his wife, who had architectural skills. These ensured that only one residence was built on each grant to an approved standard and design, that they were each set within a generous amount of landscaped land and that, in most cases, they faced the town. By the mid-1830s the parade of 'white' villas down the spine of Woolloomooloo Hill presented a picturesque sight, and was visible from the harbour and town of Sydney. (State Library, 2002).

Jenner:
The site was created in the 1866 subdivision of Alexander Macleay's 55 acre Elizabeth Bay estate. A 99 year lease of the lot was taken out by retailer Lebbeus Hordern who commissioned colonial architect Edmund Blacket to design a two storey house named Stramshall (with outbuildings) in 1871. The house was erected in 1871 in Regency Revival style, the ground and first floors and service wing.

In 1875 the lease was transferred to J.T. Neale, and two years later a third storey was added to a design by Thomas Rowe. The name was changed to Kurragheen, then later Lugano. The third storey was added in 1876-7 for new owner by architect Thomas Rowe.

In 1915 the building became a private hospital named Jenner, and several minor alterations were made to facilitate this use. The garage in the south western corner of the site was erected in the 1920s during the hospital period of usage of the site.

In 1940 the site was acquired by the Commonwealth as part of a larger resumption of properties in Potts Point for the construction of the Captain Cook Graving Dock, and much of the foreshore garden was subsequently destroyed. The hospital use continued until 1952 when the Royal Australian Navy took control of the building.

In 1966 the remaining outbuildings were demolished. The building was used for a succession of naval purposes until March 1998 when it was vacated in preparation for its disposal.

The property was sold in 1998 to horse breeder Tony Peterson. A conservation management plan for the property was prepared in 2000 and Jenner was listed on the NSW State Heritage Register in 2001.

Jenner was sold in 2009 to former car dealer Terry Mullens and his wife Wendy (SMH Title Deeds, 9-10/1/10).

The Mullens' had only recently completed a 3 year restoration before they listed Jenner (on the real estate market) early this week for about $20m (SMH Domain, 13-14/6/2014).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Selling Furniture-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Health-Activities associated with preparing and providing medical assistance and/or promoting or maintaining the well being of humans Caring for the sick in hospitals-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Health-Activities associated with preparing and providing medical assistance and/or promoting or maintaining the well being of humans Operating private and religious hospitals-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing the prosperous - mansions in town and country-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Gentlemens Mansions-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing professional people-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing famous families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Expressing lines of early grant allotments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in urban settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing towns in response to topography-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Indicators of early town planning and the disposition of people within the emerging settlement-
7. Governing-Governing Defence-Activities associated with defending places from hostile takeover and occupation Naval establishment or involvement-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian Regency Revival-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian Italianate-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Lebbeus Hordern, retailer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Edmund Blacket, Government Architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Thomas Rowe, architect-

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementJenner Precinct, Potts Point (Peter Freeman Pty Ltd, October 2001) Jun 21 2005
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0077602 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0077610 Jul 98 1055395
Local Environmental PlanCSH LEP 4 07 Apr 00   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCasey & Lowe2001Jenner, Potts Point - Archaeological Assessment
WrittenNational Trust of Australia (NSW) (James Broadbent for)1981Survey of Gardens in NSW
WrittenPeter Freeman & Associates2001Jenner House, Conservation Management Plan
WrittenSydney City Council2019Cartographica - Sydney on the Map

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

rez
(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5051239
File number: H98/00186


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.