Elizabeth Farm | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Elizabeth Farm

Item details

Name of item: Elizabeth Farm
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -33.8210716847 Long: 151.0178942280
Primary address: 70 Alice Street, Rosehill, NSW 2141
Local govt. area: Parramatta
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Deerubbin
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOTD DP411727
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
70 Alice StreetRosehillParramatta  Primary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Historic Houses Trust of NSWGeneral 

Statement of significance:

Elizabeth Farm is associated with major figures who were prominent in the 19th century development of the colony, including John and Elizabeth Macarthur, and the Swann family in the 20th century. There is a large surviving collection of documentary evidence connected to the house, which contains part of the oldest surviving European construction in Australia. The garden contains some of the earliest European plantings in Australia including a Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia), 1805-planted olive (Olea europaea), kurrajong (Brachychiton populneus), Bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii) and hoop pine (A.cunninghamii). It is an example of early colonial architecture and early agricultural experiments (Bravery 1997:13-14, 24, modified Read, S., 11/2006).

The property forms the core of a major historic farm estate which was highly influential in the development of the wool industry in Australia, the introduction and acclimatisation of plants and economic crops such as olives and vines. By its size, location and history of subdivision the property was influential on the development of the town of Parramatta.

The property is also significant in the history of conservation in NSW, being the first to be preserved by direct acquisition by the State Government, and the second property to have a permanent conservation order placed over it under the Heritage Act 1977. (Read, S., pers. comm. 2003)
Date significance updated: 05 Dec 03
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: John and Elizabeth Macarthur; Edward Macarthur
Construction years: 1793-1793
Physical description: Garden:
Elizabeth Farm today comprises almost one hectare of land. It is bounded by Alice Street and the Elizabeth Farm Reserve adjoining Alice, Alfred and Arthur Streets, Parramatta near the Parramatta River. A timber shed (the remains of outbuildings) purpose built tearooms and amenities block are subsidiary structures. (Bravery 1997:3).
The boundaries of the garden are now defined by African olives, allowed to sprawl along the fenceline to screen out tge suburban landscape beyond (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

The driveway and carriage loop were first (re-)located with some careful archaeological work and this enabled their reinstatement. The loop's centre is planted with Indian doub grass, a relative of couch grass which is in fact of South African origin and described in Elizabeth's letters. A big stand of pampas grass has been planted in the middle imitating a photograph from the 1870s. A series of Conrad Martens paintings of tge garden and a preliminary sketch with notations of carious species planted were useful. 1860s sketches and watercolours by grand daughter Elizabeth Macarthur Onslow and friend Alice Allport made just before tge family left Elizabeth Farm led to the replanting of a patch of bananas beside tge house and of a cherry laurel. Early photos from the 1870s and plant inventiries from Camden Park house (and nursery) gave further clues (ibid, 2005).

The garden contains many trees planted by Elizabeth Macarthur, araucarias, kurrajongs, a Chinese elm and a pair of olive trees. (Parramatta River REP 22 Inventory No: 123).

Drawing on the few original plantings that survived (2 hoop pines, the olives, kurrajongs, Bunya pines and Chinese elm are all thought to have been planted by the Macarthurs in the early years of the 19th century. A forest red gum (Eucalyptus tereticornis) survives which predates European settlement), some early paintings and photographs and some cunning detective work on the site, a garden was recreated which, although not an exact replica of the original, is at least a well-informed interpretation of it, as well as a beautiful sanctuary in the midst of modern Parramatta (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

Major trees include Bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii), hoop pine (A.cunninghamii), a venerable Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia), kurrajong (Brachychiton populneus). Smaller trees include crepe myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica), angel's trumpets (Brugmansia candida), tree gardenia (Rothmannia globosa) in the eastern garden, persimmon (Diospyros kaki), a European olive that can be dated to 1805 (Olea europaea cv.)(Stuart Read, pers.comm., 22/3/2019).

The shrubbery, which artist Conrad Martens painted from the eastern verandah, is again home to the scented 'Parson's pink China' or 'Old Blush' rose that John brought from his first period of exile. Also among his botanical treasures were olive trees, some to be given as peace offerings to his detractors and to be planted in the government gardens, as well as at Elizabeth Farm, along with vine cuttings, camellias, paeonies and rhododendrons. In tge flower beds were cannas, Dianthus, geraniums, larkspurs, lilies and bulbs from South Africa, with the white flowering Oxalis covering the ground (ibid, 2005).

On his return from his second exile in 1817 (on the Lord Eldon, with glasshouse), John had instructed Elizabeth to prepare 5 ha at Parramatta to receive his plants and seeds. En route he had added to his collection in Rio de Janeiro. In the first few decades of the colony, seeds and plants including the jacaranda and Citrus trees, coffee and indigo, were also collected from the Canary and Cape Verde islands. As well, trading ships from India, Ceylon, China, Africa and America brought other exotic species which may gave found their way into the Macarturs' garden (ibid, 2005).

Perennials include tropical ginger (Alpinia speciosa) and Indian shot (Canna x generalis)(Innes, 2019, 9).

House complex:
Elizabeth Farm House is a single storey late 18th century English vernacular cottage with a pair of sash windows either side of the front door and four box like rooms. Extensions since the initial building phase have increased the number of rooms The walls are hand pressed clay bricks rendered and coursed to simulate stone. Ironbark floors and cedar joinery compliment the plaster walls. (Bravery 1997:5) The original shingled hipped roof is continuous over the front verandah which is now clad with corrugated iron and supported by cast iron columns. The garden contains many trees planted by Elizabeth Macarthur, araucarias, kurrajongs, a Chinese elm and a pair of olive trees. (Parramatta River REP 22 Inventory No: 123)

Elizabeth Farm comprises three connecting buildings - the main house, a rendered brick verandahed bungalow with shingled roof under painted galvanised iron, single storeyed kitchen wing, two cellars and a two storeyed servants quarters with dairy and laundry on almost one hectare of land. It is bounded by Alice Street and the Elizabeth Farm Reserve adjoining Alice, Alfred and Arthur Streets, Parramatta near the Parramatta River. A timber shed (the remains of outbuildings) purpose built tearooms and amenities block are subsidiary structures. (Bravery 1997:3).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical Condition - Good
Archaeological Potential - Medium
Date condition updated:24 Mar 16
Modifications and dates: 1807 - Construction of a kitchen cellar.
1810 - Stone kitchen and cellars built underneath.
1820s - House remodelled and some walls rebuilt.
1826 - Doric columned north verandah added.
1827 - Dining Room and pantries altered.
1832 - Walls painted and chimney pieces put into Dining Room and Bedroom
c.1833 - Verge refinished walls and ceilings.
1860s - Verandah posts changed from timber to iron.
1865 - Contents removed.
1880 - House in untenable condition.
1883 - First subdivision of Elizabeth Farm.
1884 - Second subdivision of Elizabeth Farm.

1904 - House cleansed, disinfected and repaired.

1978-1983 - House restored and most alterations made after the Macarthur ownership.

10/2010 - large 1870s Bunya pine collapsed on tea rooms. Macarthur planting.
10/2011 - Rebuilt cafe reopens with new interiors (Parramatta Sun 19/10/11).
Further information: CPS, NTL, RNE,PRS
Current use: House Museum, public park
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, residence, orchard, vineyard, boarding house, glue factory

History

Historical notes: Elizabeth and John Macarthur arrived in 1790 with the Second Fleet. They brought with them contemporary ideas which formed the basis of their house and garden. In 1793 Governor Grose granted Macarthur 100 acres near Parramatta on the west side of 'Tipperary Farm'. This area would increase to 925 acres through grants and purchases by 1818 and proved to be almost 1100 acres when surveyed in 1881.

Elizabeth Farm was soon under cultivation: the house was surrounded by a vineyard, orchard and a three acre garden of 'most excellent vegetables' (Hughes, Joy, 2002, 383-4). Elizabeth Macarthur wrote, in December 1793:
'Our gardens, with Fruit and Vegetables are extensive and produce abundantly. It is now Spring and the Eye is delighted with a most beautiful variegated Landscape. Almonds, Apricots, Pear and Apple trees are in full bloom. The native shrubs are also in flower & the whole Country gives a grateful perfume' (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

The building of Elizabeth Farm house commenced in 1793. It was a brick single storey building with four rooms, a hall, closets, and cellar with an adjoining kitchen, servants apartments and other necessary offices. It remained the Macarthur family residence and Elizabeth's home until her death in 1850. The Macarthurs occupied and continually extended the house grant as their family increased to nine children and their financial position grew. Around 1805 a bedroom behind the drawing room and verandahs was added. The third kitchen was built in 1820 (Hughes, 2002).

From 1794 Macarthur became interested in raising sheep and began to selectively crossbreed his flock at Elizabeth Farm. The house was the scene of political and social activity including visits from many governors and their wives. Elizabeth managed the farm and their other properties during the years John was in England (Hughes, 2002).

Exiled from the colony between 1807 and 1817 as the 'leading promoter and instigator' of the deposing of Governor Bligh, John Macarthur ... toured France and Switzerland on foot in 1815 and 1816, inspecting vineyards and investigating methods of agriculture. Permitted to return to NSW in 1817, he built a greenhouse on Lord Eldon's deck to accommodate an extensive collection of plants comprising grape vines, fruit trees and other plants, many new to the colony including the 'cork tree' (Quercus suber)(still growing at Hambledon cottage nearby) and the China rose (Rosa chinensis)( (Hughes, 2002)).

Elizabeth Macarthur was left with the responsibilty of their younger children, the family properties, the breeding of the valuable Merino flock at Camden, and the export of its wool clip, contributing immeasurably to the wool industry in this critical phase. Her letters, written with clarity and insight on many aspects of the colony, reflect her admiration of native flora and the pleasure she derived from Elizabeth Farm's garden)(Hughes, 2002).

The shrubbery, which artist Conrad Martens painted from the eastern verandah, included the scented 'Parson's pink China' or 'Old Blush' rose that John brought from his first period of exile. Also among his botanical treasures were olive trees, some to be given as peace offerings to his detractors and to be planted in the government gardens, as well as at Elizabeth Farm, along with vine cuttings, camellias, paeonies and rhododendrons. In tge flower beds were cannas, Dianthus, geraniums, larkspurs, lilies and bulbs from South Africa, with the white flowering Oxalus covering the ground (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

On his return from his second exile in 1817 (on the Lord Eldon, with glasshouse), John had instructed Elizabeth to prepare 5 ha at Parramatta to receive his plants and seeds. En route he had added to his collection in Rio de Janeiro. In the first few decades of the colony, seeds and plants including the jacaranda and Citrus trees, coffee and indigo, were also collected from the Canary and Cape Verde islands. As well, trading ships from India, Ceylon, China, Africa and America brought other exotic species which may gave found their way into the Macarturs' garden (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

John Macarthur brought olive trees (Olea europaea cv.) to Sydney in 1805 and again in 1817. Although George Suttor had introduced olives to Australia earlier, in 1800 among a collection of plants from Sir Joseph Banks, these appear not to have survived. Macarthur's olives did. John, in exile in London over his involvement with the overthrow of Governor William Bligh, sensed the mood of the British administration - who were encouraged by Suttor's reports that New South Wales had potential for horticulture due to the local climate. Macarthur set off in 1815 on a tour of France and Switzerland to study 'the whole practice of the culture of the vine and the olive, and the making of the wine and the oil.' By May 1816 he was back in London with a collection of vines and olives for shipment to Australia. He was certain that these would impress Lord Bathurst, secretary of state for the colonies, and assist his return to Australia, but it took a year to get the go-ahead. He arrived in September 1817 with a cargo of 'useful plants' including two olives from Provence.

Five years later Macarthur made an equally favourable impression on Commisioner J.T.Bigge who was in NSW to investigate all aspects of colonial administration, including the development of agriculture and trade. Bigge observed that Macarthur's olive trees had assimilated well to the climate and that olive oil from NSW could prove a successful export product. The settlement's British cultural background and lack of experience growing olives (commercially) and competition from the wool production industry kept olive production in the shade. Two olive trees remain at Elizabeth Farm on the front (northern) lawn. It is unclear whether these date from 1805 or 1817 introductions. However they appear to be the earliest olive trees surviving in Australia and thus, despite Suttor's introduction in 1800, Macarthur could be credited with introducing or at least successfully establishing olives in Australia, leading (at least in the late 20th century) to a growing agricultural industry (Crockett & Martin, 2009, abridged by Stuart Read, 18/8/09).

A carriage loop was later added to Elizabeth Farm so Elizabeth and her daughters could drive through the pleasure gardens in the 'britska' that John had commissioned, emblazoned with his coat of arms and sent to Sydney, during his second period of exile (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

Their home and garden making was influenced by all the latest books from the United Kingdom, including the romantic novelists and poets; they were up to date with developments in taste and culture through subscriptions to journals like 'The Edinburgh Review' and 'The Quarterly Review'. Elizabeth read Jefferson's account of his own grand garden 'Monticello' in Virginia and later, John Claudius Loudon, the most influential and fashionable garden writer of the 19th century, whose huge volumes were readily available in the bookshops of Sydney (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

In the 1820s Macarthur added a separate two storey section to the rear, and built stables. The house additions used open planning with french doors leading to the verandahs and gardens. A few years later the verandahs may have been remodelled. A Doric columned north verandah in contrast to the treillage of the eastern verandah was added during 1826. Further extensions were made during 1826 and 1827, designed by Henry Cooper. Refacing of the servants quarters, possibly by John Verge, took place sometime around 1833. In this year John Macarthur moved to their property at Camden and died there in 1834.

Thomas Mitchell, a visitor in 1831, was impressed by the 'many interesting trees and plants which that most ingenious gentleman is endeavouring to propogate in the colony':
'I saw the first olive planted in Australia; the cork-tree in luxuriance; the caper, growing among the rocks; the English oak; the horse chestnut; broom; magnificent mulberry trees of 35 years' growth, umbrageous and green; (a) great variety of roses in beds; also climbing roses, I saw Greek pirates at work training the vines to trellices (sic) which had just been erected according to tge method of their country. The state of the orange trees was remarkable...' (Hughes, 2002).

Edward Macarthur, sent to England to be educated and serving with tge British army abroad, made relatively brief visits to Elizabeth farm. To his family the avenues of cypresses he planted there in 1806-08 were a constant fond reminder of one such visit. On another in 1824 Edward started the garden at the cottage (now Hambledon cottage), his residence on the estate. Edward inherited Elizabeth Farm estate. Elizabeth continued to farm it after John died in 1832 until her death in 1850 (Hughes, 2002).

In his last twelve years John Macarthur consulted pattern books and various architects and builders such as Henry Cooper and James Smith to prepare building plans (Bravery, 1997).

In 1872 Edward Macarthur died leaving Elizabeth Farm to his niece Elizabeth Onslow, the daughter of his brother James, but allowing his wife Sarah a lifetime interest in it.

The Macarthur family sold Elizabeth Farm Estate in 1881. From 1852 Elizabeth Farm was occupied by various tenants and agents, including William Billyard, Crown Solicitor of NSW from 1875 until 1883.

The new owner, Septimus Alfred Stephen, subdivided the land and put the house block up for auction. There were further subdivisions in 1884. The house was leased variously as a boarding house and glue factory. It was purchased as a house and six acres by William and Elizabeth Swann and family in 1904 for the land value only. The house was in a state of dilapidation. They immediately proceeded to have in cleansed, disinfected and repaired. The family became an institution in Parramatta, their house based activities including music, education, a secretarial school and dental surgery. The Swann family owned and occupied the house until 1968 when it was purchased by the Elizabeth Farm Management Trust.

A Friends of Elizabeth Farm group formed well before the formation of the Historic Houses Trust of NSW (Watts, 2014).

In 1973 the State Planning Authority assumed control of Elizabeth Farm. Between 1978 and 1983 the Public Works Department and the Heritage Council of NSW restored the buildings which were considered important as a record of the oldest surviving examples of colonial construction techniques in Australia (Bravery, 1997, 5-8, 27-28).

Architectural documentation and conservation works on the buildings were supervised by project architect Mr Ian Sansom, Government Architect's Branch. Conservation policy and landscape proposals for the garden and grounds were developed by the Landscape Section, Government Architect's Branch, in consultation with the Historic Houses Trust (HHT) and Heritage and Conservation Branch (HC annual report, 1982).

A.W.Edwards P/L was engaged to carry out restoration of lath and plaster work. A detailed property title search was carried out. Anne Bickford archaeologist was engaged to continue research, particularly in regard to the carriage way and former outbuildings. Discussions continued with the HHT regarding its likely requirements for ancillary facilities on the site. Consultation continued with Parramatta CIty Council re future management of the reserve surrounding Elizabeth Farm (HC annual report, 1982).

A draft conservation plan was prepared by the HHT in 1982. The HC SR Committee formed a sub-committee with representatives of the Heritage & Conservation Branch, HHT and co-opted members to increase involvement of the HHT in works being carried out with a view to eventual transfer of the property to the Trust for management as a house museum (HC annual report, 1982).

The site was transferred to the Historic Houses Trust of NSW in 1983 and opened to the public as a house museum in 1984 (Bravery 1997:5-8, 27-28). Since then the Friends of the Historic Houses Trust has raised funds to allow entry display refurbishment, lighting and i-pad interpretation ($38,000), soft-furnishings ($33,000) and reproduction of Elizabeth Macarthur's ivory workbox ($8000) as well as organising and supporting the successful annual Festival of the Olive event, which attracts a wide range of visitors to the property (Watts, 2014).

The garden at Elizabeth Farm today has been restored to its 1830 incarnation, relying on watercolours by colonial painters and on earlier letters from Elizabeth to friends and family in England. Gary Crockett, curator describes the restoration as 'a pastiche of artfulness and archaeology'. When the Historic Houses Trust acquired the property in 1982, he says there was no real sense of a garden. It was just a scattering of shrubs and trees - some of tgem very old - with a driveway through the middle (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

But drawing on the few original plantings that survived (2 hoop pines, the olives, kurrajongs, Bunya pines and Chinese elm are all thought to have been planted by the Macarthurs in the early years of the 19th century. A forest red gum (Eucalyptus tereticornis) survives which predates European settlement), some early paintings and photographs and some cunning detective work on the site, a garden was recreated which, although not an exact replica of the original, is at least a well-informed interpretation of it, as well as a beautiful sanctuary in the midst of modern Parramatta (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

The boundaries of the garden are now defined by African olives, allowed to sprawl along the fenceline to screen out the suburban landscape beyond (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

The driveway and carriage loop were first located with some careful archaeological work and this enabled their reinstatement. The loop's centre is planted with Indian doub grass, a relative of couch grass which is in fact of South African origin and described in Elizabeth's letters. A big stand of pampas grass has been planted in the middle, imitating a photograph from the 1870s. A series of Conrad Martens paintings of the garden and a preliminary sketch with notations of carious species planted were useful. 1860s sketches and watercolours by grand daughter Elizabeth Macarthur Onslow and friend Alice Allport made just before the family left Elizabeth Farm led to the replanting of a patch of bananas beside tge house and of a cherry laurel. Early photos from the 1870s and plant inventiries from Camden Park house (and nursery) gave further clues (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

The shrubbery, which artist Conrad Martens painted from the eastern verandah, is again home to the scented 'Parson's pink China' or 'Old Blush' rose. In the flower beds (again are) cannas, Dianthus, geraniums, lilies and bulbs from South Africa, with the white flowering Oxalus covering the ground (Kerr Forsyth, 2005).

In 2017-18 cuttings were taken off the oldest olive tree surviving in Australia, at Elizabeth Farm. These were grown on at the Australian Botanic Garden, Mt. Annan and 30 offspring resulted in 2018. This project was part of a succession-planning for senescing trees in the collection of house musea of Sydney Living Museums (Halliday, 27/4/2018).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Gardens-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Rivers and water bodies important to humans-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. Eora nation - places of contact with the colonisers-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. All nations - places of battle or other early interactions between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. Daruk nation - sites of first contact or early interaction with colonisers-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Creating a gentleman's estate-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Housing convicts in communal or shared accommodation-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Working on private assignment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Growing vines and maintaining vineyards-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Marking the transition from pastoralism to agriculture-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Experimenting with new crops and methods-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Orcharding-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Experimenting with new breeds of crop plant-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Farming by detainees and prisoners-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Agricultural Society activities - research, experimentation, acclimatisation --
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Ancillary structures - wells, cisterns-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Farming with convict labour-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Attempting to transplant European farming practices to Australian environments-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Improving agricultural production-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Trading between Australia and other countries-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Operating a tourism venture-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Developing national landmarks-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Marking origins of major industries-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Industry-Activities associated with the manufacture, production and distribution of goods (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Industry-Activities associated with the manufacture, production and distribution of goods Manufacturing glue-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Modifying landscapes to increase productivity-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use pastoral homestead-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Sheep farming for wool-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Experimenting with new breeds of stock-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Developing stock blood lines - merino sheep-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Working for pastoralists-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing for farm and station hands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Accommodating the unemployed in temporary places-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing farming families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Gentlemens Mansions-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Country Villa-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing famous families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Accommodating convicts-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Granting Crown lands for private farming-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Fencing boundaries - wooden post and rail-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Resuming private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing towns in response to topography-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Country Estate-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Rural orchards-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing and operating manorial villages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Servants quarters-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working on pastoral stations-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. College boarding house-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - facilitating agriculture-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - parks and open spaces-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing museums-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - conserving cultural and natural heritage-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - facilitating horticulture-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - facilitating pastoralism-
7. Governing-Governing Law and order-Activities associated with maintaining, promoting and implementing criminal and civil law and legal processes Scenes of sedition political dissent and rebellion-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to industrial structures-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Colonial-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - colonial period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Victorian gardenesque style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Landscaping - Federation period-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to natural landscape features.-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - colonial homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Vernacular structures and building techniques-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing landscapes in an exemplary style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing in an exemplary architectural style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Kitchens and servants-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in a rural homestead-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Valuing women's contributions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Wealthy pastoralists homes in the city-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to a museum-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gardening-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Enjoying public parks and gardens-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Places of informal community gatherings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Commemorating war losses-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Belonging to an historical society or heritage organisation-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Birth and Death-Activities associated with the initial stages of human life and the bearing of children, and with the final stages of human life and disposal of the dead. Giving birth at home-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor (Rt.Hon.) Somerset Lowry-Corry, Earl of Belmore, GCMG, 1868-1872-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor (Rebel government, 1809) Lt-Col. William Paterson, soldier and naturalist-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor (Captn., later Vice-Adm.) William Bligh RN, 1806-1810-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John and Elizabeth Macarthur, pastoralists-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor (Mjr-Gen., later Gnl., Sir) Ralph Darling and Eliza Darling, 1826-1830-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor Mjr.-Gen. (later Gen., Sir) Richard Bourke KCB, 1831-7-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Aaron Muron Bolot, architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor Sir (later Lord) Augustus F.S.Loftus, 1879-1884+-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor Sir Charles Augustus FitzRoy, 1846-1865-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor Lt.-Cnl. Sir George Gipps, KB, 1838-1846-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Swann, schoolteacher and his family-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor (Captn.) Phillip Gidley King RN, 1800-1806-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Elizabeth Macarthur, pastoralist and matriarch-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Commissioner J.T.Bigge, colonial administration auditor-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Edward Macarthur, pastoralist-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Billyard, Crown Solicitor, 1870s-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Elizabeth Farm is significant because of its association with major figures, in particular Elizabeth and John Macarthur, who were prominent in the early 19th century agricultural, political, cultural and architectural development of the colony.

It was the centre of an estate on which some of the first experiments in pastoral and agricultural land use in Asutralia took place, particularly in the early development of the wool industry.

It is associated with the Swann family for over sixty years, including their preservation of the buildings.

The farm house is part of a group of early colonial buildings (including Old Government House, Hambledon Cottage and Experiment Farm) which reflect Parramatta's importance as an early agricultural area and as the second most important settlement in the colony.

The houses's range of building styles reflect the adaption of traditional European architecture to the prevailing Australian climate.

The house is a record of the architectural ideas and ambitions of the colony's first fifty years.

The house shows growth from a vernacular cottage to a comfortable family home with some sophisticated detailing, all reflecting the development of colonial life.

The house is representative of the work of architects Henry Cooper and John Verge.
(Bravery 1997:13-14)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The house is one of the most evocative houses relating to the earliest period of Australian European history and is one of the most aesthetically pleasing of colonial bungalows.
(Bravery 1997:13-14)
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The farm has strong links with the Parramatta community. (Bravery 1997: 13-14)
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The garden contains remnants of some of the earliest European plantings in Australia, including the European Olive. Older indigenous species include kurrajong and bunya bunya and hoop pines.

The farm has a large surviving collection of original documentary evidence relating to the house and its occupants, and the existence of some of the earliest provenanced furniture.

The house is an example of the development of Australian building methods in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
(Bravery 1997:13-14)
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The Elizabeth Farm house is part of the oldest surviving construction in Australia and a rare survival of the earliest period of colonial architecture. (Bravery 1997:13-14)
Integrity/Intactness: Elizabeth farm House has a relative intactness of form, interior spaces and detailing pre-dating 1834. (Bravery 1997:13-14)
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Conserve the existing structures, illustrate the sequential phases of its occupation and development and manage & interpret the buildings and grounds in a way consistent with the site's significance.(Bravery 1997:15)

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions HERITAGE ACT 1977

ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2)

I, the Minister for Planning, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, in pursuance of section 57(2) of the Heritage Act, 1977, do, by this my order:
(1) revoke the existing exemptions made to the Historic Houses Trust under section 57(2) of the Heritage Act; and
(2) under section 57(2) of the Heritage Act grant an exemption from all section 57(1) activities to properties owned or managed by the Historic Houses Trust and listed on the State Heritage Register as outlined in Schedule A with the following conditions:
(a) that the Historic Houses Trust provide an annual report to the Heritage Council on future works proposed for its properties;
(b) that the Historic Houses Trust advise the Heritage Office archaeologists of any proposed works requiring major excavation at its properties to allow due consideration of the need for additional archaeological work;
(c) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must lodge all archaeological monitoring or excavation reports prepared with the Heritage Office library on completion after review by Heritage Office archaeologists;
(d) that the Historic Houses Trust employ as required a consultant historical archaeologist with appropriate archaeological qualifications, knowledge, skills and experience and the Director of the HHT must obtain the advice of that person about the heritage significance of the archaeological resource and/or the impact of the development proposal on the heritage significance of the archaeological resource, and take that advice into account;
(e) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must take into account as far as practicable the cumulative effect of approvals on the heritage significance of the item and on the heritage resource of its area;
(f) that the Director of the Historic Houses Trust must ensure that approvals are in accordance with any requirements, guidelines, regulations and general conditions issued by the Heritage Council. The Director of the Historic Houses Trust may impose additional conditions which do not conflict with any Heritage Council conditions.

The Hon Frank Sartor MP
Minister for Planning
Minister for Redfern Waterloo
Minister for the Arts

11 April 2008

SCHEDULE A

Item State Heritage Register Listing Number

1. Elizabeth Farm 00001
2. Rouse Hill House 00002
3. Elizabeth Bay House 00006
4. Glenfield Farm, Casula 00025
5. Hyde Park Barracks and The Mint 00190
6. Exeter Farm (Meurant's Cottage) 00205
7. The Rose Seidler House 00261
8. Wentworth Mausoleum 00622
9. Justice and Police Museum 00673
10. Meroogal, Nowra 00953
11. Vaucluse House 00955
12. Government House, Sydney 01070
13. First Government House Site (Museum of Sydney) 01309
14. Susannah Place 01310
Apr 24 2008
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0000102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0000123 Jun 78 0732380
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Regional Environmental Plan  05 Jun 90   
Regional Environmental Plan  20 Aug 99 956161
Register of the National Estate  21 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
City of Parramatta Heritage Study1993035Meredith Walker  Yes
Colonial Landscapes of the Cumberland Plain and Camden, NSW2000 Morris, C., & Britton, G./NSW National Trust (for the Heritage Council of NSW)  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAnne Bickford1982Elizabeth Farm, Parramatta : research on the history of the grounds : a report
WrittenBravery, Suzanne1997Elizabeth Farm Conservation Plan - Revised
WrittenBrian McDonald & Associates P/L2003Heritage Report on Elizabeth Farm Curtilage, Harris Park Precinct, Parramatta
WrittenCrockett, Gary 'If These walls could talk: Elizabeth Farm' View detail
WrittenCrockett, Gary 'Oiling the wheels of patronage' (about the oldest olive trees in Australia) View detail
WrittenCrockett, Gary & Martin, Megan2009Oiling the Wheels of Patronage - the origin of the olives at Elizabeth Farm
WrittenCurran, Helen & Stark, Todd2016'In Good Hands' & 'Working Smart'
WrittenCurran, Helen, Stark Todd (respectively: the latter wrote article 3 only)2016'Abundance & Curiosity: Elizabeth Farm', 'In Good Hands' and 'Working Smart'
WrittenHalliday, Steve2018'Extending the Olive Branch' View detail
WrittenHeritage Council of NSW1982Annual Report 1982
WrittenHeritage Council of NSW1982Modern technology rescue's nation's oldest house
WrittenHeritage Division OEH1996hard copy property file S96/465 [S170 heritage & conservation register/HHT/Sydney Living Museums)
WrittenHill, Dr. Scott 'Abundance and Curiosity at Elizabeth Farm' View detail
WrittenHill, Scott2018'A most excellent brick house'
TourismHistoric Houses Trust2004Elizabeth Farm View detail
WrittenHughes, Joy2002Macarthur, John', 'Elizabeth Macarthur (nee Veale)', 'Edward Macarthur' entries
WrittenInnes, Ian2019Autumn Bonanza
WrittenKerr Forsyth, Holly2005Our Earliest Gardeners - The Macarthurs of Elizabeth Farm and Camden Park
WrittenOrder Architects P/L2003Rosehill Master Plan and DCP - master plan site 2: Hope St., James Ruse Dr., Weston St. & Arthur St.
WrittenStedinger & Associates Well associated with Elizabeth Farm, Alice Street, Harris Park: excavation report
WrittenSuters Architects Snell1996Harris park cultural landscape masterplan
WrittenThe Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales The Elizabeth Farm Garden
WrittenWatts, Peter2014(Open) letter to Tim Duddy, Chairman, Friends of Historic Houses Trust Inc.

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5051394
File number: EF13/20410; S90/3624


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

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