Roxy Theatre | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Roxy Theatre

Item details

Name of item: Roxy Theatre
Other name/s: Roxy Spanish Theatre, Hoyts Roxy Centre, Village Roxy 3
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Recreation and Entertainment
Category: Cinema
Location: Lat: -33.8144732005 Long: 151.0053852360
Primary address: 65-69 George Street, Parramatta, NSW 2150
Parish: St John
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Parramatta
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Deerubbin
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
65-69 George StreetParramattaParramattaSt JohnCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
The Palace GroupPrivate 

Statement of significance:

The Roxy Theatre has high cultural significance as a good and relatively intact representative example of the 'Picture Palaces' of the interwar period, its overall form and surviving original fitout and fabric displaying the major attributes of this building type. More particularly it is an excellent example of 'Interwar Spanish Mission' style, displaying features typical of this style but also with a notable individuality and quality of architectural design.

The theatre also provides evidence of the changing nature of film theatres and theatre going since the 1920s. Its architectural character and function have been influenced by both national and international developments in film technology and theatre visitation since the adventure of the 'Talkies' - ranging from large single auditorium regularly seating nearly 2000 to the present multi-theatre configuration. The size and architectural character of the building also reflect American cultural influences in the interwar period and the profitability of 'Picture Palaces'.

The location and origins of the theatre are closely associated with the growth of Sydney's suburbs in the interwar years and Parramatta in particular. It is an attractive and distinctive local landmark and particularly valued by the regular theatre-goers of its early years and those interested in movie and architectural history (its retention in the 1970s being in large measure due to intervention by such groups). (Somerville 1997)

Professional, trade and manufacturing practice - example of the work of notable architect. Evidence of social and cultural life.
Date significance updated: 29 Jul 98
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Moore & Dyer in association with Herbert & Wilson, architects
Physical description: Inter-War Spanish Mission purpose-built cinema building flanked on either side by loggias containing shops. The central arched entrance is richly decorated with stuccoed ornamentation. The Roxy is the best surviving example in Australia of the adaptation of this style of architecture to a large public building, making the most consistent use of the Spanish Mission style throughout. (Walker)

The building comprises a large 'picture palace' cinema in the Spanish Mission Style. The main, double height theatre block is set back from the street frontage behind an 80 ft X 40 ft (24.4m x 12.2m) forecourt lined along the sides by arcaded walkways which terminate in small shops on the street frontage.

The blocky massing of the front facade is symmetrical, centred on a large semi-circular arch over the main entrance. This features a scalloped Moorish soffit and enriched lable panel and mouldings. The arch is set in an ornate central tower with the entrance reached via a grand flight of steps. External walls are of stuccoed ornament emphasised by being picked out in (modern) multi-coloured scheme. The original name-sign at the top of the tower is part of the overall facade design.

The main foyer opens directly off the external staircase via a set of timber-framed and glazed doors and comprises a double-height space symmetrically laid out with stairs rising to either side of a central mezzanine/balcony. The foyer retains most of its original layout and character with stuccoed walls, arched openings and vaulted roof to the mezzanine and a 'Spanish' style ceiling of panelled and painted timber. The Spanish Mission style is continued in remaining original light fittings, furniture, joinery and floor tiles.

The original main auditorium features extensive plasterwork decoration including arched windows, false balconies and door case along the side walls and a large central dome in the ceiling. Smaller theatres have been fitted below the original stage reducing the overall size of the original auditorium and requiring removal of the proscenium arch. Remnants of original plaster work decoration, however, survive behind the present screen and the theatre retains its original seating.

The fabric of the theatre includes brick interior and exterior, terracotta floor and roof tiles, painted timber, wrought iron and moulded plaster decoration inside. (Somerville 1997
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Physical condition of the building is generally good following recent works including alterations/refurbishment and external painting.
Date condition updated:21 May 98
Modifications and dates: World War II - Elaborate ceiling luminaires removed
1950s - Original Christie organ removed and sold
1976 - Converted to three small theatres by Hoyts. Original proscenium and splay walls removed and dress circle cut off from downstairs to form one cinema. Celing and walls of the upper part of the auditorium retained; remainder of stalls converted to two smaller cinemas. Minor alterations made to vestibule
1982 - Exterior repainted
1988 - Forecourt reinstated to original character and building painted externally and internally

Externally, retains much of its significant original fabric and architectural character, particularly to main street frontages.

Internally original large auditorium has been subdivided and altered, including removal of the original proscenium and splay walls and cutting off the dress circle from downstairs to form a separate cinema. Ceiling and walls of the upper part of the auditorium were retained while the remainder of the stalls was converted to two smaller cinemas. The original entrance hall/vestibule has been retained largely intact.
Further information: One of the senior staff at the theatre, Mr Ian Hanson, worked in the theatre before the alterations of the 1970s and recalls much of the early character and fitout including organ and light fittings etc. he also took a photograph in 1974 of the interior showing the proscenium arch (later destroyed) which has been made into a post card which is available at the theatre.CPS, RNE, NTL
Current use: not in use
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, town lot, Picture Theatre (single), then Picture Theatre (multi-theatre) and shops, Restaurant, Nightclub, Bar

History

Historical notes: Early Parramatta:
Prior to 1809, leases that were granted to individuals at Parramatta were mainly on large acreages surrounding the Government town centre. While there were some free settlers in the town, it was prisoners' huts that dominated the town allotments. The first permanent dwellings constructed in the new town were concentrated along the principal thoroughfares of George, Macquarie and Church Streets. Allotments in George and Macquarie Streets were the site of a number of convict huts that were later occupied by free persons. The subject area contained a convict hut allotment.
Both Church and George Streets formed the centre of commercial activity in Parramatta. The owners and occupiers of the properties were mainly people with local interests, their occupation indicating the character of the street. Only a few maintained interests elsewhere; in Sydney and neighbouring districts. The industrial or manufacturing usage of town allotments in the centre of Parramatta is typical of nineteenth-century country towns.

The width of George Street was originally 205ft (62.5m) but is now 20m wide, so the original street frontage is now 21.2m behind the present frontage.

In May 1811 Governor Macquarie regularised the streets and alignments, renaming High Street as George Street in honour of the King and naming Phillip, Macquarie and Marsden Streets. By 1814 additional north-south streets were planned, including O'Connell, Smith, Charles and Elizabeth (later Harris) Streets, and new east-west streets which included Hunter and Argyle Streets.
The subject area crossed a number of early allotments, as shown on the 1822 and 1844 town plans.

The 1822 and 1844 plans of the town of Parramatta show the street block as steadily developing along each street frontage during this period. The buildings shown on these plans are generally concentrated along each street frontage and the centre of the street block remains largely undeveloped. The 1822 map shows two structures fronting George Street within the subject area at this time, and a larger L-shaped structure fronting Macquarie Street extends across the subject area boundary (at the rear of what is now 58-68 Macquarie Street).

A convict brick barrel drain was constructed through this area sometime between 1820 and 1836 to improve drainage of low lying areas in the town of Parramatta, particularly on the river flats. Studies of the original drainage patterns at Parramatta indicate that in times of heavy rain, water would have collected around the small hills on the south side of town and run down a shallow gully across Macquarie Street, between Church and Smith Street, onto river flats at the eastern end of George Street. The construction of the drain would have improved the land in this area for building, allowing reliable drainage for the first time. (Part of this drain is currently on display in the foyer of the building currently occupying 16-18 Smith Street, Parramatta.)

The 1844 map shows that there were three wooden structures fronting George Street that were contained within, or extended into, the subject area at this time. There was also a wooden rectangular building towards the rear of an allotment fronting Macquarie Street (near the southwest corner of the subject area).

By 1895, there had been further development within the subject area. The 1895 Detail Survey plan for this area (Sheet 18) shows that the allotment currently occupied by the Roxy theatre (69 George Street, DP 76080) contained two semi-detached buildings fronting George Street at this time, and a large structure adjacent to the southwest boundary of the allotment (probably a workshop, indicating the presence of small-scale industry within the town centre at this time). The block currently occupied by the carpark in the centre of the street block (DP 607789) included part of a structure at the rear of 58 Macquarie Street (also probably a workshop). The subject area also included a number of outbuildings and other features associated with allotments fronting Macquarie Street, including cess pits (Kass et al, 1996).

The Sands Directories and Parramatta City Council Rates Books give a sketch outline of ownership of the site before construction of the theatre in 1930.
SD 1930: no entry; SD 1929: White, Fredk. C.; SD 1923: Louis, Jack?; SD 1920: Butcher, Miss A., ?; SD 1918: Butcher, Miss A., ? ' PCC RO 1914: No.62, Sec , lots . , landowner Parra. ; SD 1910: Butcher, Miss A., boardinghouse ?/ ;
PCC Rates Book 1879: No.219 to 220: possibly George and Herbert Coates timber yard.

The Roxy Theatre was the first in a proposed chain of suburban theatres managed by Roxy Theatres Ltd and was 'named after the master cinema-showman himself' Originally it had 1923 seats and though it was opened with the 'Talkies' it had a Christie theatre organ which was reputedly one of the largest and finest in the state.

In June 1929 the Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers' Advocate reported that 'negotiations have practically been completed for the purchase of a suitable site in George Street...owned by Mr. L.Jack...at present occupied by two two-storey houses and a cottage' for the construtcion of a theatre designed especially for the 'Talkies'. Two adjoining properties were simultaneously sold for the construction of a number of shops. The sale thus comprised in total, 59, 61, 63, 65, 67 and 69 George Street (NBRS&P, 2015, 29).

The opening on 6 February 1930 was 'an event of considerable social importance' with 'a packed audience and an interested crowd of several thousands in the street opposite the brilliantly-illuminated entrance'. The 'formal ceremony of dedication was performed by the Mayor' supported by local dignatories and an MLA. The theatre was 'praised as a symbol of local progress' and the evening features 'greetings to the people of Parramatta 'voiced' from the screen by several Paramount film stars.'.

The architecture of the buildings was a sincere attempt at the Spanish style in a time when Australia was 'infected' by 'a kind of Spanish/Moorish/Venetian style'. It exhibited a 'provincial simplicity' in its arcaded forecourt, foyer and auditorium but also included 'a few Mesopotamium bull sphinxes over the proscenium'. Contemporary descriptions of the large palm court in front noted it 'adorned with palms and ferns, and flanked with arcades.' The main entrance under the ornate quasi-Spanish Mission tower opened into an elaborate two-storey high foyer with Spanish motifs. The auditorium was noted for its striking proscenium and splay walls, ceiling dome with its sunburst lighting effects, mock windows on the side walls and blind arcading supporting the deep ceiling cornice. The building was also air-conditioned.

In 1937 Western Suburbs Ltd leased the cinema. Hoyts purchased the site in 1946 (Tod (2018) says this was in 1944. During the war the elaborate ceiling luminaries were removed and in the 1950s the organ was sold but little else was altered until the 1970s.

In 1974 sale of the theatre by Hoyts was proposed and with an unsure future, the site was classified by the National Trust of Australia (NSW) as an important example of a suburban picture palace. The Trust made the Roxy the second cinema in NSW, after the State Theatre in Sydney, to be placed on its Register (NBRS&P, 2015, 13).

Though demolition was prevented, in 1976 Hoyts tripled the cinema removing the original proscenium and splay walls and cutting off the dress circle from downstairs to form one cinema. The ceiling and walls of the upper part of the auditorium was retained while the remainder of the stalls was converted to two smaller cinemas. Minor alterations were made to the vestibule. The front courtyard was retained. New shops were installed in the side wings.

Photographs in the National Library collection show the Prime Minister Gough Whitlam at the re-opening of the Roxy in 1976 with a capacity crowd, night lighting and the planting of a special tree in a tub. (www.nla.gov.au/catalogue).

In 1979 Hoyts sold the Roxy to Village Cinemas (ibid, 2014, 14). Tod (2018) says that Hoyts finally sold the Roxy in 1991, but continued to lease it back until 1995, when Village Roadshow took over.

In 1982 the exterior was repainted and in 1988 the forecourt was refurbished with new shops installed in the arcaded wings flanking the front courtyard. The building was painted externally and internally, opening again on 13 November. Village Theatres took control in July 1996 (Somerville 1997)(Walker 1993). T0d (2018) says this was in 1995.

A c.1930 photograph of the Roxy's front courtyard showed young Lord Howe Island palms (Kentia sp., either K.fosteriana or K.belmoreana)(NBRS&P, 2015, 40). A c.1976 (ibid, 2015, 54) and another 1996 photograph of the courtyard showed no planting. Since then Lord Howe Island palms were planted in the courtyard in two rows, complementing the theatre's architecture and era and Hollywood/California/South Sea Island imagery (Stuart Read, 2005, updated 4/3/2015).

In March 2002 the Roxy Cinema closed for the last time, after 72 years use as a cinema. In 2004 it was bought by the Palace Group who commenced renovations - gutting the two lower, more recent cinemas and turning it into a nightclub (NBRS&P, 2015, 14). Tod (2018) says the new use was as a hotel and restaurant.

In March 2004 the Roxy was reopened after being redeveloped into an entertainment complex. Renamed 'The Roxy', the hotel provided a bar with access to the courtyard, a venue to view live entertainment and to hold functions in a contemporary atmosphere within an elegant and historical setting (The Roxy Hotel, 2004).

(NBRS&P, 2015, 14) state that the Roxy reopened in 2006 as an entertainment venue - providing restaurants, bars and a cabaret/music venue, known as the Roxy Hotel and Nightclub.

After issues arising with behaviour of some patrons and the Police, the owner decided to close the Roxy Hotel venue on 31/7/2014 (owner, pers.comm., 12/2014).

Tod (2018) notes that the Roxy is now the subject of a concept development application which proposes a 33 storey commercial tower to be built behind and above the theatre. It is proposed to demolish the rear of the building from the dress circle back, while the tower would be supported on legs driven through the side walls of the theatre. The foyers would become an entrance to the tower and its function rooms. The roof would be removed and replaced with a flat roof, but how much auditorium decoration would be retained is unknown. The existing dress circle theatre would be retained. The National Trust (NSW) maintain that the Roxy should be acquired from the developer in a land swap deal to bring it into public ownership. Its theatre should then be fully restored by reinstating the stalls (capacity: 1500), with a new stage and flytower (theatrical rigging system). The National Trust assert that several examples in other Australian cities show where a restored, heritage theatre has revitalised the area around it, such as Toowoomba's Empire, Subiaco's Regal and Newcastle's Civic theatres (Tod, 2018, 7).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural: Plains and plateaux supporting human activities-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Ethnic influences-Activities associated with common cultural traditions and peoples of shared descent, and with exchanges between such traditions and peoples. (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Commerce-Activities relating to buying, selling and exchanging goods and services Operating an entertainment venue-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Holding film and stage premieres-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Developing local landmarks-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Providing a venue for significant events-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Providing a venue for significant events-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Technology-Activities and processes associated with the knowledge or use of mechanical arts and applied sciences Technologies for creating spectacles-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Building settlements, towns and cities-National Theme 4
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 21st century Suburban Developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in suburban settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in suburban settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Cultural Social and religious life-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Suburban Consolidation-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation musical gatherings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Cinema-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to a Club-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to a restaurant-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to the pub-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going dancing-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Places of informal community gatherings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Developing local clubs and meeting places-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Roxy Theatre has hisotircal significance arising from the evidence it provides of the changing character of film theatres and theatre going since the interwar years. It architectural character and function have been influenced by both national and international developments in film technology, theatre design and theatre-going patterns since the advent of talking pictures in the 1920s.

The theatre's main auditorium (originally seating 1,923) provides evidence of the popularity of film going and influence of movie culture in Australia in the interwar years, and though subsequently subdivided into smaller theatres both it and the building as a whole reflect this early mass-culture phenomenon. The building's subsequent history and changes - including declining popularity to the point of proposed demolition and more recent conversion into a multi-theatre complex retailing selected 'nostalgic' features - reflects the full gamut of change in Australian film going over the past 67 years.

The theatre provides evidence of widespread American influence in all aspects of cultural life including particularly architecture and popular culture, particularly film culture (vis a vis Australia's prior local film industry). The building's richly ornamented Spanish Revival Style is part of the development of this style in Australia in the interwar years and more generally of the range of exotic 'national' styles as interpreted by Hollywood used throughout the nation for the theatres of the day. The size and architectural character of the building also provide evidence of the economic, profitability of picture theatre development of the day with its large audiences and regular patterns of attedance.

The theatre's location is associated with the spread of population and associated service, including recreational facilities, to Sydney's suburbs as well as, more particularly, with the particular demographics - ie size and importance - of Parramatta at this time - being originally erected as the first in a proposed suburban chain by the Roxy company. The opening of the building was a notable event with local and state politicians attending, huge crowds and special greetings by leading Hollywood actors of the day. (Somerville 1997)
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The theatre is an outstanding representative example of the 'Picture Palaces' of the interwar period, its overall form and surviving original fitout and fabric displaying the major attributes - physical and functional - of this particular 'phenomenon'. It reflects, for example, the deliberately 'escapist' character of both films and film environment in this period as well as the influence of the United State from whence came both films and archiectural models for the theatres. It also reflects the contemporary norms which ensured that while theatre going was affordable for almost all, it should provide an opulance and granduer (in both decoration and facilities such as lounges, smoking rooms, etc) quite deliberately 'other than ordinary'.

The Roxy is also a notable example of 'Spanish Revival Style' - relating to the style as a whole as it evolved in Australia in the Interwar period and more particularly as the style was applied to theatre design. In design and detailing it displays much that is original and well designed including particulalry the open air, arcade-lined forecourt which served as a useful and attractive lobby and also allowed effective viewing of the main elevations of the building and was a very original feature for the day. The building's decorative treatment is a notable and creatively rich example of Spanish Mission forms and features and though judged in its day as a relatively refined one avoiding the 'gaudy and garish of contemporary examples' it is today 'probably one of the most, if not opulent or richly designed suburban picture palace in Australia...complete with no tell-tale austere corners...spcaious and well furnished and the auditorium itself, particulalry with the original light fittings, (Christie organ and air-conditioning) rivallign most of the city centre cinemas' in its day.

The aesthetic significance of the building arising from its role as an exemplar of its style and its own intrinsic formal and decorative attributes is greatly enhanced by the relatively high degree of intactness of the building, particularly externally but also in the main foyers and auditorium.

The building is also a notable local landmark, its overall massing with striking tower and set back from the street with flanking arcaded wings and richly decorative detailing contributing to its significance streetscape role. (Somerville 1997)
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The theatre is of significance to several groups within the community most notably to those interested in Australia early movie and theatre history as well as more generally heritage agencies such as the National Trust of Australia (NSW) who became actively involved in the 1970s attempts to stave off demolition.

The building has many strong associations for those who were its regular patrons in earlier years, particulalry throughout its heyday in the 1930-50s. (Somerville 1997)
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
This item is rare.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:


Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentCMP and Design Competition Brief for a tower block within and behind (south of) the auditorium  
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act

Order Under Section 57(2) to exempt the following activities from Section 57(1):
* The maintenance of any building or item on the site where maintenance means the continuous protective care of existing material; and
* The minor repair of the building where minor repair means the repair of materials by patching, piercing-in, splicing and consolidating existing materials and including minor replacements of minor components such as individual bricks, cut-stone, timber sections, tiles and slates where these have been damaged beyond reasonable repair or are missing.
Oct 13 1989
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentDraft CMP: Roxy Theatre, 69 George Street, Parramatta (Jackson Teece Chesterman Willis, July 2002) Sep 26 2002
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0071102 Apr 99 271546
Heritage Act - Permanent Conservation Order - former 0071113 Oct 89 1008486
Heritage Act - s.130 Order - Lapsed  23 Sep 86 84 
Local Environmental Plan  27 Feb 97 20 
Local Environmental Plan  21 Jul 89 844634
National Trust of Australia register      
Register of the National Estate  21 Mar 78   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
City of Parramatta Heritage Study1993210Meredith Walker  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Tourism 2007The Roxy View detail
Written 1930Building (magazine) - 12 June 1930
TourismAttraction Homepage2007The Roxy View detail
WrittenJackson Teece Chesterman Willis, July 20022002Draft CMP: Roxy Theatre, 69 George Street, Parramatta
WrittenJyoti Somerville1997State Heritage Inventory Form
WrittenKass, Terry, Liston, Carol & McClymont, John1996Parramatta - a Past Revealed
WrittenNBRS & Partners2017Conservation Management Plan - The Roxy, 69 George Street, Parramatta NSW 2150
WrittenNoel Bell Ridley Smith & Partners2015Draft Conservation Management Plan: The Roxy
WrittenRoss Thorne1976Picture Palace Architecture in Australia
WrittenThomson, Warren2017'Parramatta's Green Spine'
WrittenThorne R, Tod L & Cork K1996Movie Theatre Heritage Register for NSW 1896-1996
WrittenThorne, Ross1976Picture Palace Architecture in Australia (source of watercolour painting of the Roxy)
WrittenTod, Les2018'The Roxy Theatre - will it die in the wings?'

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5051406
File number: 14/5143; S90/01328; HC 32196


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