Regent Theatre | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Regent Theatre

Item details

Name of item: Regent Theatre
Other name/s: Mudgee Regent Theatre
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Recreation and Entertainment
Category: Theatre
Location: Lat: -32.5904610 Long: 149.5888030
Primary address: 5-7 Church Street, Mudgee, NSW 2850
Parish: Mudgee
County: Wellington
Local govt. area: Mid-Western Regional
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP633977

Boundary:

Allotment boundary
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
5-7 Church StreetMudgeeMid-Western RegionalMudgeeWellingtonPrimary Address

Statement of significance:

The Regent Theatre is an intact, representative example of an Art Deco, regional theatre from the heyday of the moviegoing phenomenon in New South Wales. The place retains a bold Art Deco facade, with stepped skyline, wall tiling and chrome fixtures. Its scale and key location in the heart of Mudgee demonstrates the importance of cinema in regional centres in the early 20th century.

The Regent is rare in its degree of intactness of the interiors, including cornices, wall lighting, theatre seating as well as purpose built original furniture and fittings such as ticket booth, octagonal foyer sofa and signage. The Regent includes a rare example of an early childcare facility incorporated into a theatre.

The Regent Theatre is associated with George N Kenworthy, noted theatre architect, who designed some of the finest theatres and Art Deco buildings in Australia and who played a major role in the development of Art Deco in Australia. The theatre is an excellent example of Kenworthy's theatre work for a regional town centre.

The Regent has research potential in its complete and detailed demonstration of architectural and social aspects of cinema-going during the 20th century. The in-situ audio and projection equipment are of industrial heritage value and have the potential to yield information on the evolution of technical aspects of film projection, sound reproduction and presentation and theatre lighting.

The Regent is of social significance to the regional community of the central west of NSW. It is also highly esteemed by Architecture and Heritage organisations for its place in the cinema and architectural history of NSW.
Date significance updated: 16 Oct 19
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: George Newton Kenworthy
Physical description: The Regent Theatre is a free-standing theatre building with a 4-storey faade and is one of Mudgee's three most prominent buildings on the skyline. The Regent is detailed in the Inter War Art Deco architectural style and the faade features several groupings of vertical fins with a dramatic stepped awning concentrating attention on the illuminated cinema billboard. The entrance has fine tilework on the pillars featuring geometric, Art Deco motifs and the tile design on the entry steps forms the words "Regent Theatre". Original timber entry doors have circular, chrome handles.

The foyer area retains original finishes, fixtures and fittings, consistently detailed in Art Deco style, including: the hexagonal ticket box light fittings, mirrors and velvet circular lounge. The candy bar is the former Nursery (Crying Room) which was established in one of the two original shopfronts on the facade. It contains 1946 wall murals which include nursery rhyme characters, 'Disney' characters and signs such as "We welcome you to the Regent Nursery". There is a mezzanine lounge level located over the foyer and below the dress circle.

The auditorium seats 986 and retains its original fabric including the seating and fans which are operational. The decorative elements of the auditorium are in a simplified, geometric Art Deco style, including the stepped ceiling, engaged pilasters, proscenium arch and the cartouche motif used on the walls and dress circle balcony. Facilities for stage performance include a 15 x 8 metre stage, with fly tower and back of house dressing rooms and toilets.

The large projection (bio) box, stretching across the full width of the theatre, is encased in concrete for fire protection and contains a valuable collection of projection equipment, including: two 1972 Super Zenith 450" carbon arc projectors; a 16mm projector; 1948 Westrex Sound System; the original c.1938 slide projector and attachments; the original lighting board; and various early artefacts including a Harringtons Limited - "Hints for Projectionists".
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Buidling condition is generally fair, requiring some maintenance. The interior is intact with worn finishes.
Date condition updated:16 Oct 19
Current use: Cinema, theatre
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, town lot, cinema

History

Historical notes: CINEMA
In the period from 1920 to 1956 movie-going was second only to sport as a leisure activity and was a major influence on fashion, design, language, music and behaviour. It also had an effect on the built environment of the cities, towns and suburbs of NSW, in the proliferation of theatre buildings (Thorne, Tod, & Cork, Cultural Heritage of Movie Theatres in New South Wales 1986-1996, 1997).

Estimates of screening attendances for NSW are stated by cinema and theatre expert Ross Thorne, as follows:
'From 1921 to 1953 every man, woman and child, on average across New South Wales, would have attended a movie theatre from 18 to at least 20 times per year' (Thorne, The Heritage Significance of the Cinema-going Experience in New South Wales, 2008).

The first cinema in NSW to show projected film, opened in Sydney in 1896 and the first purpose-built picture theatre was the Bijou Picture Palace, opened in 1909. By 1915 there were a total of 115 cinema venues in the Sydney CBD and suburbs.

The development of country cinema venues followed along the lines of suburban urban development, in five, slightly overlapping stages:
1. Use of local halls and town halls
2. Open air structures
3. Shed-like structures
4. Development of a decorated setting or theatrical environment
5. 1930s modernisation - conversion, rebuilding and new construction

The Regent Theatre is part of the fifth phase of picture theatre development in Australia (1932 to 1940). The Art Deco and Functionalist styles were the primary architectural styles used for picture theatres in this period, also referred to as Moderne or expressionist-inspired. Well-known theatre architects from this period were C Bruce Dellit, Guy Crick, Bruce Furse, George Kenworthy and Charles Bohringer (Cork, 2004). Country theatres were generally seen a pale imitations of those in the cities, however the Regent has been identified along with Yass, Tamworth and Scone as equal to the best Sydney examples, offering its patrons an experience that was associated with foreign luxury (Thorne, Tod, & Cork, Cultural Heritage of Movie Theatres in NSW 1896-1996, 1997, p. 48).

REGENT THEATRE
Regent Theatre Mudgee Ltd was established as a company in 1935, with a capital of (Pounds)10,000 and the intention to develop a cinema and music hall. Mudgee had the Criterion, Alhambra and Town Hall theatres at the time but there was demand for greater accommodation (Hickson, 2018).

George Newton Kenworthy, well-known theatre architect of that period, was engaged for the project. The theatre was designed to seat 986 and to accommodate both 'talking pictures' and stage plays. It included a 15 x 8 metre stage, with fly tower and accommodated dressing rooms and toilets for performers.

Just prior to the official opening on 21 August 1935, two movies were shown to a full house. It was report in the local newspaper, as follows:
'Wednesday last saw the long looked for opening of the most up-to-date picture theatre outside a radius of 30 miles from Sydney. The architect, Mr G. N. Kenworthy, under whose supervision some of Sydney's largest theatres have been built, has spared no pains in the way of affording pleasure to the eye and ease of audition to the ear.

Even it its state of incompletion on Wednesday night the hearing was wonderful. No doubt with the completion of the ceiling, which will be lined with 'Canec' sound proof composition sheets, the occupants of every seat in the house will enjoy perfect hearing as well as uninterrupted sight. The rubber 'air-cushioned' seats throughout the dress circle and the whole of the auditorium are a marvel of comfort. The carpeting and furnishing throughout is in the very best taste. It was most interesting to see the working of the automatic ticket seller. By the simple process of pulling a lever one's tickets are shot out to the right hand, and the change as though by magic appears in a bowl at the left.' (Mudgee Guardian, 5 August, 1935).

The theatre company was in financial difficulties soon after it started operating and in 1937 the Regent was purchased by Mudgee businessman Ivan Adams, who already owned and successfully operated the Criterion Theatre (Broadley, n.d.).

Adams undertook a range of modifications in the first few years of acquiring the Regent. These included tiling the lower level of the facade and laying a rubber floor in the vestibule (Broadley, n.d.). He was also responsible for converting one of the original shops into a Nursery (crying room). Artist Edgar Kitchener (Kit) Goninon, who was living in Mudgee at the time, was commissioned to paint murals on the Nursery walls (Falson, C. , 2019). Goninon painted nursery rhyme and 'Disney' characters and engaged his sign-writing skills to embelish the wall murals with popular children's verses such as "Hey Diddle Diddle" and signs including: "We Welcome You to the Regent Nursery". Adams also installed a cutting edge Western Electric Mirrophonic sound system in 1938 and heating throughout the auditorium in 1939 (Broadley, n.d.).

The Regent remained in the same family ownership for almost 70 years. Following Adams' death in 1968 the theatre was managed by long-time employee, Edna McMonigal, until her retirement in 1973. A series of leases followed: to Bert Thomas in 1973; John and Elaine Wooton in 1974 (Falson, P. , 2019); and c1975 to Mabel Haswell. Haswell terminated her lease in in 1985 and the theatre was closed (Lamond, n.d.).

GEORGE N KENWORTHY
George N Kenworthy was born in Manchester, Lancashire in 1884 and migrated to Australia around 1910. He served in the Government Architect's Branch of the Department of Public works (1912-1924) before joining the practice of Henry White, prominent theatre and cinema architect. Kenworthy may have been White's partner in the firm (Broadley, n.d.) and by 1927, he held the position of Managing Architect. Kenworthy responsible for the design and construction of the State Theatre in association with John Eberson, American theatre architect. Other projects he carried out in White's office were the Wintergarden Theatre, Rose Bay; Palais Theatre, St Kilda, Victoria; Theatre and Tea Gardens, Manly; Newcastle City Hall; Civic Theatre Centre, Newcastle; and Hengrove Hall, Macquarie Street, Sydney (Australian Institute of Architects).

In September 1929 Kenworthy severed his association with White's office and established his own practice. "Kenworthy specialised in the design of cinemas, the best known of which is the much altered and expanded, Cremorne Orpheum (1935). Of course, Kenworthy designed other building types as well, including broadcasting studios, blocks of flats and houses. In addition, he lectured in architecture at Sydney Technical College, served on the Board of Architects of NSW and the Royal Institute of British Architects, and was a councillor of the NSW Chapter of the Royal Australian Institute of Architects during the 1930s and 1940s" (Lumby , 2016).

Kenworthy's architectural design work includes St James Theatre, Sydney; St James Theatre, Auckland, NZ; Star Theatre, Bondi; Orpheum Theatre, Cremorne; and Athenaeum Theatre, Melbourne (Australian Institute of Architects). The Royal Hotel, Orange and Olympus House, Katoomba are also attributed to Kenworthy (NSW Heritage Office). Some unusual building types he designed were the Atlantic (motors) display stand, Sydney Royal Show (Decoration and Glass, 1939) and the 2UW Radio Theatre (Building and Engineering, 1944). Many of this theatre buildings have been demolished or have undergone major modification, as theatre going has diminished and the buildings fallen out of use. Some of these are the St James Theatre, Sydney; Wintergarden Theatre, Rose Bay; Savoy Theatre, Hurstville.

Kenworthy is considered to have designed the first Art Deco cinema in Australia in 1932 with reconstruction of the Rialto Theatre, Manly (Thorne, Art Deco Style: Will the Real (Australian) Art Deco Please Stand Up?, 2013). Art Deco and, the closely related, Functionalist architectural styles became the characteristic styles for picture theatre design in Australia in the period 1932 -1940 (Thorne, 2001). The potential for bold, iconic expression on the skyline, resulted in these becoming the most representative styles for this building type.

Kenworthy's skill with the use of decorative arts to create 'theatre' is demonstrated in the splendour of Sydney's State Theatre and Ballroom; the outstanding Spanish Baroque interior of the Civic Theatre, Newcastle; and the ornate and exotic Palais Theatre, St Kilda, Melbourne. The 1935 Ballroom addition to the Paragon Cafe is considered "a triumph of Australian Art Deco" (Lumby , 2016). He demonstrates equal skill in a more restrained style, in the Paragon's 1939 supper room, "with concealed lighting, curved corners and light-toned timber veneer wall linings is an outstanding example of the Inter War Functionalist style" (Lumby, 2016).

In 1935, Kenworthy produced "one of the best examples of an Art Deco cinema in Australia in his design for the Hayden Orpheum Picture Place at Cremorne, Sydney. Although the exterior was relatively unadorned, the Art Deco motifs commence with the entrance doors and cloud-like pattern in the terrazzo on the floor. The auditorium had great coherence with, first, its imitation windows on the stalls and dress circle levels showing a continuous view of sky, stylised suns, sun's rays and clouds; and second, the layered ceiling with Art Deco ornament at the edge of each layer concealing indirect lighting wo wash across the next layer above" (Thorne, 2001).

1930s descriptions of his work, often effusive with praise, discuss Kenworthy's creative design of lighting. In relation to Cremorne Theatre: 'The lighting is the most ambitious scheme ever attempted in any theatre in the Commonwealth. Firstly, the whole auditorium is diffused with a pale blue light with gradually wanes and a warm purple glow follows more than 2000 lamps are used to produce this delightful illusion, in addition to 2,000 feet of Neon tubing. The Cremorne Orpheum Theatre, the apotheosis of all theatre progress..." (Decoration and Glass, 1935)

REFERENCES

Australian Institute of Architects. (n.d.). NSW Architects Biographical Information.
Broadley, J. (undated). Regent Theatre History. Retrieved from Revive the Regent: https://www.revivetheregent.org.au/by-john-broadley
Building and Engineering. (1944). 2UW Radio Theatare, Sydney. Building and Engineering, 12-13.
Cork, K. (2004). Parthenons Down Under - Chapter 5 of Kevin Cork's PhD thesis. Retrieved from kythera-family.net: https://www.kythera-family.net/en/photos/diaspore-cafes-shops-cinemas/parthenons-down-under-chapter-5-part-a-of-kevin-corks-phd-thesis
Cork, K. J. (1995). Cinema as "Place": The case of the picture theatres in a group of towns and villages in the Central West of New South Wales. Retrieved from ROSS THORNE: http://www.rossthorne.com/human/other.html
Decoration and Glass. (1935). Cremorne Theatre Opens. Decoration and Glass, 30.
Decoration and Glass. (1939). Architectural Merit in Show Exhibit. Decoration and glass., v.4, no.,13, p.52.
Falson, C. (2019, May 15).
Falson, P. (2019, October 6).
Hickson, B. (2018). Satement of Significance Statement of Heritage Impact.
Lamond, R. A. (undated). The History of the Regent Theatre Mudgee.
Lumby , R. (2016, Autumn). The News Autumn 2016 edition. Retrieved from The Twentieth Century Heritage Society of NSW & ACT Inc: https://www.twentieth.org.au/news/Autumn_2016.pdf
Mudgee Guardian. (5 August, 1935). The Regent "A Thing of Beauty",. Mudgee Guardian. Mudgee, NSW, Australia.
NSW Heritage Office. (n.d.). The Paragon, State Heritage Register Listing .
The Orpheum Theatre at Cremorne. (1935). Decoration and Glass.
Thorne, R. (2001). Palaces of Pleasure. In M. Ferson , & M. Nilsson, Art Deco in Australia: Sunrise over the Pacific. St Leonards: Craftsman House.
Thorne, R. (2008). The Heritage Significance of the Cinema-going Experience in New South Wales. Retrieved from Ross Thorne: http://www.rossthorne.com/downloads/HERITAGE.PDF
Thorne, R. (2013). Art Deco Style: Will the Real (Australian) Art Deco Please Stand Up? Retrieved from Ross Thorne: http://www.rossthorne.com/
Thorne, R., Tod, L., & Cork, K. (1997). Cultural Heritage of Movie Theatres in New South Wales 1986-1996. Sydney: Department of Architecture, University of Sydney.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Developing local landmarks-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Townships-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Commercial strip development-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in regional settings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Developing cultural institutions and ways of life-National Theme 8
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Patronising artistic endeavours-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Art Deco-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing structures to emphasise their important roles-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - 20th century Art Deco/Jazz Age-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural style - cinema-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to the pictures/movies-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Cinema-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with George N Kenworthy, architect-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Regent Theatre represents an excellent and rare surviving example of a country town theatre that played a key role in the heyday of the moviegoing phenomenon. The Regent illuminates an aspect of the cultural history of country NSW in demonstrating the importance of cinema in popular culture in the late inter-war period. In NSW, 2040 venues were constructed and 'picture going' was second only to sport as a leisure time activity, impacting on popular taste in fashion, design, language and music. The "golden years" of movie-going lasted from the 1930's to the 1960's, not only in Mudgee but also in numerous towns and cities throughout the country.

From 1937, picture-going grew to become a permanent feature in the entertainment life of the towns of Mudgee, Gulgong, Rylstone and Kandos. The Regent Theatre has provided a regional venue for regular weekly visits to the cinema.

The Movie Theatre Heritage Register for NSW 1896-1996, undertaken by Ross Thorne et al, for the Heritage Office (NSW) and the Australian Heritage Commission, identifies the Regent Theatre Mudgee as belonging to the fifth and final stage of cinema venue development: 1930s construction and/or refurbishment. While this phase is described as often being 'little more than a new front of moulded asbestos cement', in the context of country NSW, the Regent (together with the cinemas at Yass, Tamworth and Scone) is identified as 'equal to the better Sydney suburban examples'.

The children's nursery, within the theatre, is an important and early example of childcare facilities in a public space and a rare example of such a facility associated with a rural cinema.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The Regent is associated with the work of George Newton Kenworthy, noted cinema architect who designed outstanding theatres in the picture palace genre and some of the finest Art Deco buildings in Australia. Kenworthy's work includes three items listed on the NSW State Heritage Register: State Theatre and Former State Shopping Block Including Interiors; Newcastle City Hall and Civic Theatre; The Paragon (Ballroom and Supper room). The Palais Theatre, St Kilda, Melbourne, also designed by Kenworthy, is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register. Through his work in theatre design Kenworthy played a major role in the development of the Art Deco style in Australia. Further research could illuminate the nature of his early partnership with Henry White; and a better understanding of the extent of his influence.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The Regent has been a focal point of the popular culture of Mudgee and a mecca for visitors and tourists to the region, for generations. The theatre has played an important role socially, both as a venue as well as for its physical form within the urban fabric.

The contemporary community esteem for the Regent, is evidenced by the state-wide response, on social media and in submissions to the local council, opposing its proposed partial demolition and conversion to a hotel. 'Revive the Regent' community group was established to promote retention of the theatre. The efforts of 'Revive the Regent' were recognised with the 2019 National Trust Award for Advocacy.

The joint nomination for listing on the State Heritage Register by the National Trust of Australia, Twentieth Century Heritage Society of NSW and the Institute of Architects (NSW Chapter) is further evidence of a broad, state-wide social value.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The Regent Theatre contains numerous items of industrial heritage value in the form of projection and related equipment which have the potential to yield information for a better understanding of the evolution of technical aspects of film projection, sound reproduction and presentation and theatre lighting.

It is of state heritage significance for its complete and detailed demonstration of architectural, technical and social aspects of cinema going during the 20th century.

The cinema design work of Kenworthy is not as broadly recognised as the work of, his one-time partner, Henry Eli White. The Regent has potential to contribute to a better understanding Kenworthy's body of work and his importance as a designer in the architectural history of NSW.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
With the demolition and/or modification of most of the state's old picture theatres, the Regent Theatre is now a rare example of a once more numerous building type.

A desktop survey of remaining cinemas in country towns indicates that only seven Interwar cinemas in rural NSW towns retain their original form and architectural and decorative features and still operate as theatres. This is a relatively small number of sites and each intact example is considered rare.

The Regent Theatre is rare as one of three remaining intact theatres in the Inter War Art Deco architectural style (Bingara Roxy, Scone Civic, Mudgee Regent). It is also rare in having projection equipment retained in situ.

The Regent is an extremely rare example of an early childcare facility, incorporated into a theatre.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The Regent Theatre is a good representative example of the type of rural town picture theatre which dominated early 20th century culture throughout NSW.

The Regent Theatre is a strong representative example of the use of the Art Deco architectural style in the development of picture theatre design in the decade of the 1930s in NSW. It is an intact example of an Art Deco picture theatre, retaining characteristic style elements such as bold projecting fins in a prominent parapet, geometric tiles, etched glass and timber doors and chrome hardware. The period detailing is carried through the interiors to all finishes and fittings in the same style and character, including the dress circle lounge and auditorium.
Integrity/Intactness: High
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage RegisterRegent Theatre0203507 Feb 20 26494
Heritage Act - Interim Heritage Order - RevokedRegent Theatre - 5-7 Church Street Mudgee - IHO NoIHO 14407 Feb 20 18437
Local Environmental PlanMid-Western Regional Local Environmental Plan 2012I210 Aug 12   
Potential Heritage ItemL 29 Nov 01   
Register of the National Estate - InterimIndicative Place101217 ACH 

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Mudgee Shire Council heritage Study1985 Hughes Trueman Ludlow  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAustralian Institute of Architects NSW Architects Biographical Information
WrittenBarbara Hickson2018Regent Theatre Mudgee Statement of Significance
WrittenBuilding and Engineering19442UW Radio Theatre, Sydney
WrittenDecoration and Glass1939Architectural Merit in Show Exhibit
WrittenDecoration and Glass1935Cremorne Theatre Opens
WrittenFerson, M. & Nilsson, M.2001Art Deco in Australia: Sunrise over the Pacific
WrittenJohn Broadley Regent Theatre History
WrittenKevin Cork Cinema as Place: The case of the picture theatres in a group of towns and village in the Central West of New South Wales
WrittenKevin Cork Parthenons Down Under - Chapter 5 of Kevin Cork's PhD thesis View detail
WrittenRobert A Lamond The History of he Regent Theatre Mudgee
WrittenRoy Lumby2016The News, Autumn 2016 edition
WrittenThorne, R., Tod, L., & Cork, K.1997Cultural Heritage of Movie Theatres in New South Wales 1986-1996

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5052045
File number: EF18/2049


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