Sewer Vent and Cottages | NSW Environment & Heritage

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Sewer Vent and Cottages

Item details

Name of item: Sewer Vent and Cottages
Other name/s: Premier Street Sewer Vent and Cottages
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Utilities - Sewerage
Category: Other - Utilities - Sewerage
Location: Lat: -33.9188216970 Long: 151.1489421360
Primary address: 24, 26 Premier Street, Marrickville, NSW 2204
Parish: Petersham
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Marrickville
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT177DP1142
LOT187DP1142
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
24, 26 Premier StreetMarrickvilleMarrickvillePetershamCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Sydney WaterState Government 

Statement of significance:

A rare, if not unique, combination of Queen Anne revival brick Water Board cottages and sewer vent exhibiting excellent qualities of the brick and stonemasons craft, the likes of which are not probable to be reproduced again.
Date significance updated: 10 Jan 01
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Public Works Dept.
Builder/Maker: Public Works Dept.
Construction years: 1898-1900
Physical description: A pair of Queen Anne Revival workers cottages, flank the 1898 brick sewer vent stack, which is sited amongst detached late Victorian and turn of the 20th century dwellings. The cottages form part of a fairly diverse architectural character streetscape, many of which are substantially intact, although late 20th century alterations have affected a few dwellings in the immediate visual catchment.

The brick stack is constructed of moulded bricks, with an overall classical proportion, detailing and entasis to the shaft. The shaft is presently fitted with steel bands as extra support fitted in the late 20th century. It appears as though a concrete band towards the capital of the shaft is a mid to late 20th century alteration but that is to be confirmed.

The construction of the cottages is load bearing brick in English bond with original timber joinery including: windows, doors, turned timber verandah posts and boarded verandah ends, Marseilles pattern terracotta tiles, brick chimneys and terracottag chimney pots. Internally the cottages are also substantially intact retaining much of their original finishes and joinery. The front fence is a conservation of the original.

No. 24 is the western cottage to the vent shaft. The lattice in the front garden of no. 24 is from the late 20th century.

In the early 1990's the two cottages were subject to a high quality programme of conservation works including authentic colour scheme which survives today.

The cottages and vent shaft are integral to the streetscape characteristics of the immediate area, and are in themselves excellent examples of their type, design and construction from that period.

Both the cottages and the shaft are substantially intact and are still used for their original purposes as dwellings and vent shaft although not necessarily as workers cottages from the Water Board. This is in itself a rarity in Sydney Water's system.

The vent shaft is a landmark particularly from the south west to the south eastern areas, as it is sited in an elevated position towards the southern side of the rise.
Date condition updated:24 Jun 00
Modifications and dates: Nil
Current use: Cottages and Sewer Vent
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, cottages and sewer vent

History

Historical notes: The stack was built by the Public Works Department on the Board's behalf as part of the Western Suburbs Sewerage Scheme, put into service 1898-1900. The steel access door in the base of the stack opens to step-irons leading down to the penstock chamber below. The chamber is the junction of three sewer mains, the Eastern Main Branch (reticulating Marrickville, Petersham, Newtown, Leichhardt, Annandale & Camperdown), the Northern Main Branch (reticulating Marrickville, Petersham, Annandale, Leichhardt & Ashfield) and the Western Main Branch (reticulating Ashfield, Burwood, Drummoyne, Strathfield, Concord and Homebush). The Outfall Main originally led to the sewage farm at Rockdale, but from 1916 has been connected to the Southern and Western Suburbs Ocean Outfall Sewer (SWSOOS), terminating at the Long Bay treatment works at Malabar.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Health-Activities associated with preparing and providing medical assistance and/or promoting or maintaining the well being of humans Providing sewerage systems-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Health-Activities associated with preparing and providing medical assistance and/or promoting or maintaining the well being of humans (none)-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Technology-Activities and processes associated with the knowledge or use of mechanical arts and applied sciences Technologies for sanitation-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Technology-Activities and processes associated with the knowledge or use of mechanical arts and applied sciences (none)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Residential-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. housing (suburbs)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Eccentric residence-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Federation era residence-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of urban estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th Century Infrastructure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Providing sewers and stormwater outlets-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis (none)-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working on public infrastructure projects-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working in the public service-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour (none)-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing sewerage treatment-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Edwardian-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Federation Queen Anne-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to utlilitarian structures-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in suburbia-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Living in, adapting and renovating homes for changing conditions-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The cottages are tangible reminders of the historical importance employees were valued at the time of its construction. The vent stack historically is strategically placed at the junction of the western main sewer branches.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The vent stack is a prominent landmark within the area surrounding the cottages. The cottages and vent stack in themselves make a high quality contribution to the residential streetscape of Premier Street.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The cottages and vent stack are classified by the National Trust of Australia (NSW) and with this group are likely to be held in high regard by members of the local community.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The cottages and sewer vent exhibit construction techniques and detailing, the quality of which is unlikely to be reproduced.

The vent is a prime strategic position for the function it plays in the maintenance and operation of the sewer main.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
They are collectively as a pair, unique examples of their type of vent and cottages in Sydney Water's system and rare, if not unique in NSW.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The cottages, albeit of a high quality, are representative of the Queen Anne style of architecture around the turn of the 20th century.
Integrity/Intactness: Substantially intact
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Manage the place and its significant components in accordance with the Heritage Council State Owned Heritage Asset Management Guidelines and the Minimum Standards of Maintenance and Repair in the NSW Heritage Regulations. Manage significant site elements in accordance with a Conservation Management Plan (CMP). If no CMP exists, consult with Asset Management Commercial Services with respect to commissioning a CMP. When commissioning a CMP, do so in accordance with the Model Brief for CMPs available on ConnectNet. Seek endorsement of the CMP from the Heritage Council of NSW. Works undertaken in accordance with a Heritage Council-endorsed CMP do not require further approval under the NSW Heritage Act. Involve heritage professionals as required under the terms of the CMP, or as otherwise determined necessary. Review CMP every 5 years or in a major change of circumstances, whichever is sooner. Review of a CMP should only be undertaken following consultation with Asset Management Commercial Services . When commissioning a CMP review, do so in accordance with the Model Brief for CMPs available on ConnectNet. Where no CMP is in place, or where works are outside the scope of the existing CMP, assess heritage impacts of proposed works in accordance with Sydney Water Environment Impact Assessment guidelines (e.g. undertake a Heritage Assessment and/or Statement of Heritage Impact as required, obtain Heritage Council approval as required). Consult with the Heritage Manager, Environment and Innovation, when major works are planned which affect items of State heritage significance. Undertake archival and photographic recording before major changes, in accordance with Heritage Council guidelines. Lodge copies of the archival record with the Sydney Water Archives and the NSW Heritage Office. Where the item is listed in a Local Environmental Plan Schedule of Heritage items, determine if works are exempt from approval under the LEP provisions. Where works are not exempt, obtain necessary approvals from the local council, in accordance with SWC EIA Guidelines.

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementPremier Street Sewer Vent and Cottages CMP, prepared by Sydney Water for Sydney Water, dated August 2005 CMP endorsed by the Heritage Council on 23 September 2005 for a period of five years, expires 23 September 2010. Sep 23 2005
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0163615 Nov 02 2209709
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Alexandra Canal Conservation Management Plan2004 NSW Department of Commenrce, Heritage Design Services  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Management Plan (HC endorsed)Asset management division, Sydney Water Corporation.2005Sewer vent and cottage. Premier Street Marrickville : Conservation management plan
WrittenAWT EnSight1996Historical Analysis and Heritage Review of Georges River, Cooks River and Port Hacking Catchment Areas Sewerage Systems, June

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5053875
File number: H03/00319


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