Sydney Water Head Office (former) (1939 building) | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Sydney Water Head Office (former) (1939 building)

Item details

Name of item: Sydney Water Head Office (former) (1939 building)
Other name/s: Water Board Building, Sydney Water Head Office, 1965 extension to HQ of Metropolitan Water, Sewerage and Drainage Board of Sydney, MWS&DB, Primus Hotel
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Government and Administration
Category: Office building
Location: Lat: -33.8748830290 Long: 151.2075967360
Primary address: 339-341 Pitt Street, Sydney, NSW 2000
Local govt. area: Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
PART LOT1 DP621404
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
339-341 Pitt StreetSydneySydney  Primary Address
16-22 Wilmot StreetSydneySydney  Alternate Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Multiplex Developments (NSW) Pty LtdPrivate 

Statement of significance:

The 1939 Sydney Water head office building is of State significance, reflecting the function and growth of Sydney Water and the importance the organisation has had and continues to have in the lives of many people in NSW. The building in its aesthetic, historic and scientific (technical/research) qualities is an outstanding example of architectural growth and development for its values which are reflected in its original design, materials, construction techniques, evidence of use, movable relics and siting within the City of Sydney. The building is held in high esteem by recognised community groups and authorities throughout Australia and New South Wales.
Date significance updated: 05 May 05
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Budden & Mackey (building); Stanley Hammond (bronze panels over front door)
Builder/Maker: Howie Moffat & Co.; Melocco Brothers (scagliola, marble, travertine, terrazzo); Wunderlich Ltd.
Construction years: 1938-1939
Physical description: The 1939 building is now best viewed from Pitt Street within 100 metres to the south of the building and from the intersection of Pitt and Bathurst Street and to the side lane

The building exhibits elaborate use of coloured granite and marble finishes. Architectural terracotta tiles and bands of bronze and copper elements plus the associated bronze windows and curved fenestration to the corner make it one of the most exquisite examples of the Art Deco style and detail in Sydney, if not Australia. Bas relief panels are strategically placed above the entrance in Pitt Street which depict the water industry and its progression of technology.

Interior:
Internally, in the entrance foyer marble and travertine surfaces are located on the floors and walls, and late 20th Century suspended ceilings have been fitted. The entrance doors as a windbreak in the main entrance foyer are late 20th Century. The memorial board wall which has mosaic tiles is likely to be an infill from the 1960s.

On the ground floor, a number of original surface finishes remain behind superficial fitout including highly significant scagliola clad columns.

Rating Chamber:
The former Ratings Chamber is one of several monumental public chambers built in Sydney in the inter-war period. It is the largest built in the Art Deco/Functionalist style and, on completion, won the most fulsome praise of any space in the new building. It has a series of massive, free-standing columns, finished in bright rich red scagliola (by Melocco Bros. of Annandale), contrasting with neutral tones on other surfaces. Its generous proportions (c140' x 120') and elegant finish are winged on four sides by curtain walls of a mezzanine (office) floor. The centre of the space rises 31' to a great centre light panel beneath the central light area (of the building) which measures c52' x 42'. Walls and fluted pillars supporting the mezzanine fllor are of travertine marble (Bryant, 2018, 9).

Courtyard:
The building has an interior courtyard where internal offices gain light surrounded by white glazed ceramic tiles to maximise light reflection. The courtyard lower levels were infilled in the 1960's. Internally on upper levels most offices have suspended ceilings from the 20th Century although many of the internal terrazzo and travertine floor and wall surfaces survive, as does a considerable amount of original timber joinery. Office fitouts generally have changed over time.

Alterations include new fire door installations in the southern ground floor facade, and evidence of some louvres and air conditioning systems fitted to windows. A new fire door is noted on the eastern elevation in Pitt Street.
Date condition updated:18 Sep 18
Modifications and dates: Major modifications in 1965. Minor fitout changes continually until the present.
Current use: Hotel
Former use: Aboriginal land, town lot, offices

History

Historical notes: The Board's first office, occupied in April 1888, was at Circular Quay, close to the present Overseas Shipping Terminal. The building was considered to be in an inconvenient locality, and in January, 1890, the Board moved to premises on the west side of Pitt Street (No. 289) near Park Street. In March, 1891, a block on the corner of Pitt and Wilmott Streets, with a frontage to Pitt Street of 72-ft. and a depth of about 83-ft., was resumed and offices erected on it. These were occupied by the Board in May, 1893.

In 1911 an adjoining 87-ft. frontage in Pitt Street was bought and extensions completed in 1918. Additional land and buildings at the rear of the office were acquired in 1929 and 1936, and that part of Stewart Lane separating the Board's property was resumed, thus providing a block approximately 160-ft. square. This, together with shop premises fronting Bathurst Street, provided for comprehensive planning for present needs and future development. In 1936 it was decided to clear the site and erect a new building consisting of a basement, ground floor, mezzanine and six upper floors. This was completed on December 24, 1939, and was occupied on January 2, 1940.

The building was designed by the renowned architectural practice of Budden and Mackey who also designed both Transport houses in Macquarie Street (1936) and in York Street, Sydney (1938). Howie Moffat & Co. were the builders.

The building was among the last (if not the last) major government office building to be completed before the outbreak of World War 2 and demonstrates the progression of the Art Deco style in the late 1930s, from the decorative geometric influences of the pre-Depression era towards the less-ornamental Functionalist style. As the Water Board's public face, it was purposely imbued with such rich symbolism as a celebration of all that had been achieved since 1888. The building's design and quality stands as a testament to the organisation's innovation and drive in the late 1930s, under its then President, T.H.Upton. Three bronze panels above the front door on Pitt Street were designed by sculptor Stanley J.Hammond (1913-2000), the end result of a public competition. Judges for it were Water Board President T.H. Upton, Director of NSW Art Gallery, W. Ashton and the architect N.C. Mackey. As well as builders Howie Moffat & Co., many of the leading manufacturers and craftsmen of the interwar period were associated with the building. The marble, travertine, terrazzo and scagliola finishes are good examples of the commercial work of highly-regarded master craftsmen, Melocco Bros. of Annandale. Representative materials produced by other major manufacturers or building companies include Wunderlich Ltd., B. G. Plummer & Co; and R. Fowler Ltd. The significant and conspicuous use of high quality materials and finishes throughout exemplify not only the architects' and craftsmens' skills, but also a lavish works budget, among the largest for a public building of its day (Bryant, 2018, 6).

One of the most-important requirements of the building, when built, was that it be able to grow as the organisation expanded. Firstly, provision was made in the foundations and sstructural steel columns to allow for the addition of a further three floors at a later date (this never happened). Secondly, the main public area was designed to be 'oversized' to meet a projected increase in rate collection over the following twenty years as population increased and thus services expanded. The Rating Chamber, occupying the greater proportion of the ground floor was the main area originally visited by the public. This housed the Board's Assessor and Receiver Branch, responsible for collecting rates and charges. During the 1950s, upwards of 280 staff were employed in this branch. The Cashiers' Section was in the centre of the Ratings Chamber, behind a fully-enclosed counter. The northern and southern sides were occupied by the Rates Section, and there were several private cubicles to allow discreet discussion of customer affairs and difficulties (ibid, 2018, 9).

During the 1960s the Ratings Chamber was seriously compromised in the name of modernisation. The great space was divided by a concrete floor slab, destroying its original spatial character and grandeur. By 1969 all the Art Deco style plasterwork had been stripped out, the scagliola columns had been partially butchered, the enormous skylight encased between concrete slabs, the main entrance foyer locked off and the travertine floors and marble walls saw-cut to install cables and partitions. Little evidence remained of the once-glorious space, which has been largely hidden from public view since (ibid, 2018, 9).

The direct association of Sydney Water, the successor of the Metropolitan Water, Sewerage and Drainage Board, with the site continued until its sale in 2008 and removal of Sydney Water staff to a new Head Office in Parramatta. In 2013 plans commenced to conserve and adapt the building into a hotel, designed by Woods Bagot, architects, with heritage services provided by GBA Heritage (ibid, 2018, 6). In 2016 the completed conservation project was awarded a 2016 Australian Institute of Architects' commendation for Heritage Architecture - Creative Adaptation (ibid, 2018, 10).

In 2017 the former Sydney Water Head Office building re-opened its doors as the Primus Hotel. Its soaring ground floor rating chamber, with massive red scagliola columns, where the public once paid their water rates, now welcomes guests and diners. One of Sydney's great interior spaces, long-hidden, has been returned to the public (ibid, 2018, 6).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Developing local, regional and national economies-National Theme 3
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Developing local landmarks-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Early Sydney Street-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 20th century Suburban Developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of urban estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Commercial strip development-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Beautifying towns and villages-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in urban settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Urban landscapes inspiring creative responses-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Shaping coastal settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Water and drainage-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Providing drinking water-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working complex machinery and technologies-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working in offices-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and operating public infrastructure-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - conserving cultural and natural heritage-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing reticulated water-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. (none)-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Developing cultural institutions and ways of life-National Theme 8
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. work of stonemasons-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Interwar Functionalist-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing structures to emphasise their important roles-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing in an exemplary architectural style-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Art Deco-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Patronising artistic endeavours-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - 20th century Art Deco/Jazz Age-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Creating an icon-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Interwar Art Deco-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Interior design styles and periods - Inter War-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1850-1900-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 2000-2050-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1900-1950-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Domestic life-Activities associated with creating, maintaining, living in and working around houses and institutions. Ways of life 1950-2000-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Budden and Mackey, architects-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Howie Moffat and Company, builders-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Stanley Hammond, sculptor-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with the Melocco Brothers, terrazzo, scagliola, marble, mosaic specialists-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Pitt Street building, completed in 1939, and the Bathurst Street extension, completed in 1965, have served as the Head Office of the Sydney Water Corporation and its predecessors up to the present. They are respectively, the fourth and fifth offices occupied by the Corporation and its predecessors. The Sydney Water Corporation was established in 1888 and initially known as the Board of Water Supply and Sewerage. The Corporation has occupied part of the site (the Pitt Street building) since 1891. The Corporation is one of Australia's oldest Government water and sewerage authorities, and the largest such authority in New South Wales. The Head Office building is particularly associated with members of the Corporation's predecessors such as T. H. Upton, President of the MWS&DB Board at the time of the completion of the 1939 building. Together with former board members (such as A. H. Moverley, M.L.A.), the completion, quality of finishes and successful operation of the building is a testament to the initiative and vision of these elected and appointed Board members. As the fourth Head Office building for Sydney Water, the building has been the place for many decisions which have shaped Sydney's management of water, sewage and drainage infrastructure, many items which are of State and National significance. The building accommodated the Corporation's technical staff which have been responsible for the design, construction and ongoing maintenance of metropolitan Sydney's water and sewerage infrastructure. The offices and particular floors of the building are, therefore, associated with past engineers of considerable historical note for their role in major engineering works such as the construction of dams, tunnels, pumping stations etc. Albeit altered over the years to adapt to changing operational requirements, the integrity of the original and early planning and finishes of the offices are relatively intact and present a rare insight into a large office building of the era. Reflects the growth of the then Water Board and the stature of the organisation in the quality of the building. It is associated with, and one of the most significant works of the influential architects H. E. Budden and N. G. Mackey. Through its remnant fabric, the place retains tangible evidence of the influences and conflict of Government administration of the day, given the major need in supply and management of Sydney's water, sewerage and drainage, at the time of its construction. The size of the building reflects the demand for increased staff and responsibility levels during that part of Sydney's expansion and development. The building, through its high quality design, detail, materials and finishes reflects the high regard and importance the MWS&DB held by the community at the time, and the controversial use of funds at a time of critical uncertainty of Sydney's water supply given the drought of the late 1930's. The site was developed from 1891 through to c.1965 to provide successive places of accommodation for State Government offices. The continuing use of the buildings by a government authority demonstrates the practice of centralising head offices in purpose built accommodation within Sydney's Central Business District. The longevity of uninterrupted operations (over 110 years) by the Sydney Water Corporation and its predecessors at the Pitt Street site is now unique in New South Wales in regard to a large Government authority. The Pitt Street office completed in 1939 is the last major government office building to have been completed before the outbreak of World War II which then marked a major shift in architectural expression.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The building represents state of the art office design and detailing at the time of its construction. It has a relatively high state of integrity, the building's fabric continuing to provide an excellent example for the study of the development of modern Australian architecture. It is arguably one of the best known examples of institutional buildings in the City of Sydney, particularly in regard to its former extensive public areas providing a place for inquiry relating to domestic, commercial and industrial rating and building construction activities. Possibly the most elaborate, high quality and well detailed Institutional Art Deco building in Sydney, probably NSW. Associated with, and designed by the influential architects Budden and Mackey. Reflects the growth of the then Water Board and the stature of the organisation in the quality of the building. In its original design, detail and materials, the building is arguably the most elaborate, high quality example of Institutional Inter-War Functionalist/Art Deco building in Sydney, and probably across New South Wales. Through its use and extent of scagliola, marble, travertine, terrazzo and terracotta and ceramic tiles the building contains construction elements and finishes which collectively are unlikely to be built again to such an extent. The building is a high quality contribution to the architectural townscape of Sydney which has become increasingly rare since its construction. The use of architectural terracotta tiles on this building, whilst not rare in the Sydney area, are arguably of the highest quality detailing in Sydney, if not NSW. The building retains three bronze low relief architectural panels designed by Stanley James Hammond, a major Victorian architectural sculptor whose professional career spanned the Inter-War eras.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The building is recognised by the Heritage Council of NSW as significant to New South Wales in relation to its historical, scientific, cultural, social, archaeological, natural and aesthetic values. As Head Office for Sydney Water, the building has been associated with the working lives of many Sydneysiders. It is likely many of these associations will be of value to those people, particularly the former propensity for long workplace associations with the organisation. Given the strong sense of identity of former and present employees and management with the Corporation and its predecessors, the building is likely to be held in some regard by these members of the community. The 1939 building has been recognised by a number of organisations for its high design values and will likely be highly valued by non-statutory organisations such as the National Trust of Australia (NSW), The Royal Australian Institute of Architects (NSW Chapter), and the Art Deco Society and other interest groups for the outstanding design and detail qualities, the likes of which are not likely to be built again. The building is recognised on the Register of the National Estate as a place which is a component of the cultural environment of Australia, that has aesthetic, historic, scientific and social significance for future generations, as well as for the present community.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The building exhibits high quality use and details of materials which are now increasingly rare. Such elements and details include: the use of scagliola on ground floor columns and internal common wall surfaces, bronze and copper facade elements, architectural terracotta, bas relief panels amongst others. Beyond the late 20th century fitouts, it is likely the building will exhibit spaces and planning, the likes of which have become increasingly rare with institutional buildings constructed at that time.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
In terms of their collective high quality and innovation and as the headquarters of Sydney Water Corporation, both the 1939 and the 1966 buildings are unique.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Elements of the building are representative in their construction and use of materials with other comparable commercial buildings at or after the period of its construction.
Integrity/Intactness: The 1939 building has undergone internal alterations associated with the 1966 building. Much superficial internal fitout is late 20th century.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Manage the place and its significant components in accordance with the State Owned Heritage Asset Management Guidelines. Where no Conservation Management Plan, Heritage Assessment or Statement of Heritage Impact is in place, or where works are outside the scope existing heritage documentation, assess heritage impacts of proposed works in accordance with Sydney Water Environment Impact Assessment procedures. Undertake a Heritage Assessment and/or Statement of Heritage Impact as required by EIA procedures. Where the item is listed in a Local Environmental Plan Schedule of Heritage items, determine if works are exempt from approval under the LEP provisions. Where works are not exempt, obtain necessary approvals from the local council, in accordance with SWC EIA Guidelines. Undertake archival and photographic recording before major changes, in accordance with Heritage Council guidelines. Lodge copies of the archival record with the Sydney Water Archives and the NSW Heritage Office.

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Recommended ManagementReview a Conservation Management Plan (CMP) 
Recommended ManagementPrepare a maintenance schedule or guidelines 
Recommended ManagementCarry out interpretation, promotion and/or education 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0164515 Nov 02 2209709
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Local Environmental Plan 35409 Dec 05   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Head Offices Buildings, Heritage Assessment & Conservation Management Guidelines2001 Truman, Zaniol & Associates P/L  Yes
Alexandra Canal Conservation Management Plan2004 NSW Department of Commenrce, Heritage Design Services  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Written 1940Decoration and Glass, (February issue)
Written 1940Building Magazine (Issues 1, 3 and 4)
WrittenBryant, Jonathan2018'A new life for Sydney Water Head Office' View detail
WrittenGBA Heritage20151939 Former Sydney Water Head Office Conservation Management Plan
WrittenWeir Phillips2008Sydney Water Head Office, 1939 Building and 1965 Building Conservation Management Plan

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5053884
File number: EF14/5615; H05/115


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