Granville Town Hall | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Heritage

Granville Town Hall

Item details

Name of item: Granville Town Hall
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Community Facilities
Category: Hall Town Hall
Location: Lat: -33.8328682014 Long: 151.0093469390
Primary address: 10 Carlton Street, Granville, NSW 2142
Parish: Liberty Plains
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Parramatta
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Gandangara
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP910484
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
10 Carlton StreetGranvilleParramattaLiberty PlainsCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
City of Parramatta CouncilLocal Government19 Oct 05

Statement of significance:

The Granville Town Hall is of state significance as a rare and intact example of a Victorian Free Classical government building. It is thought to be one of only two intact nineteenth-century council chamber buildings extant in Sydney's west. It demonstrates aspects of the history of Granville and the Parramatta locality in the late nineteenth century. Built in 1888 following the incorporation of Granville in 1885, it is an important symbol of the growth of Granville and its sense of identity. Although the seat of local government has since moved to Parramatta, the building is a well-known local landmark and continues to be used as a major venue for community events and activities.
Date significance updated: 02 Sep 03
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Council Chambers by C A Harding, Sydney architect; auditorium by J W Hill, Parramatta architect
Builder/Maker: Banks and Whitehurst
Construction years: 1888-1888
Physical description: The Granville Town Hall is a largely intact example of a Victorian Free Classical local government building.

The original 1888 section is a two-storey, rendered brick building on an almost square plan with a hipped corrugated iron roof. The faade to Carlton Street is designed in the Italianate manner and features a two-storey projecting port and flanking piers with second-storey paired pilasters. Fenestration is bi-partite on the ground floor and tri-partite on the upper floor. The interior consists of offices and the original Council Chamber. Of interest is the timber joinery, especially the elaborate architraves and the timber Honour Boards in the Council Chamber. The auditorium or hall, added in 1900, is a plain painted brick gabled structure running westward behind the front section. Internally the large hall is distinguished by restrained Doric pilasters supporting a panelled vault ceiling. Restoration work undertaken in early 2003 by architect Graham Edds involved removing the modern plaster covering the walls and ceiling of the auditorium, and revealing an unusual ripple iron ceiling, painted pale bllue with gold stars, and three large decorative ventilation domes (Parramatta Advertiser 26/03/03). To the south of the front section of the town hall there is a former council workers office, now used by the Granville Historical Society. This is a Federation brick building, with the stretcher brick bond tuck pointed on the northern and eastern sides. It has a gabled Marseilles tiled roof and exposed beams in the eaves. It has two equal sized rooms. On the west and south-western sides of the hall there is a variety of non-significant skillion roof structures.

The current allotment covers an area of 2739.4 sqm and is located on a gentle sloping site fronting Carlton Street, Granville. Today it is bounded along the northern side by a laneway leading to the library carpark. To the south and west of the property now abuts residential development. A driveway from Carlton Street located south of the Town Hall and between it and the former council workers office provides limited on-site vehicular access and carparking.
The site contains the:
- former Council Chambers / Town Hall complex
- former council officer's building, now used by the Granville Historical Society
- galvanised storage shed
- additional toilet.

For further details of interior fabric, see history of modifications and changes.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
The Granville Town Hall is well maintained. Urgent repair works involving re-roofing and installation of a dampproof course commenced in early 2000. Since then, Parramatta Council has undertaken conservation works to the former Town Hall Chambers involving conservation of both the interior and repainting of the exterior. Further conservation works are planned for the Hall attached to the Council Chambers over the next 2 years.

Over the past 10 years the Town Hall has undergone considerable conservation (Form, 2016, 17).

The separate 1922 Council Offices building is in fair condition although access for internal inspection is yet to occur (Form, 2016 (2), 17).

The archaeological potential of the site is considered to be low. This is due to the Town Hall being the first building on the site and occupying the whole site.
Date condition updated:06 Jun 03
Modifications and dates: 1888 construction of the Town Hall commenced.
There have been 5 main stages of construction (more detailed information is included in the Conservation Management Plan).

Phase 1 (1888 - 1889):
The original Council Chambers (designed by Charles A Harding) comprised four offices for staff and library on the ground floor, and the Council Chambers and Mayor's Room on the first floor with a balcony located over the entrance porch.

Phase 2 (1900 - 1921):
In 1900 a main Hall or auditorium (designed by James Whitmore Hill) including a gallery, stage and two 'retiring rooms' on one side with lavatory accomodation was constructed. The upstairs gallery was accessed by a new door opening cut into the former external western wall. A timber external fire stair was constructed to provide fire egress from the gallery.

Phase 3 (1922-1927):
A separate building was added to provide offices for the council engineer and health inspector. It is the thought that additional toilets were added during this period. In 1923 the iron palisade railings to the flower beds fronting Carlton Street were removed.

Phase 4 (1928 - 1929):
This phase involved major additions to the western end of the main auditorium with the relocation of the stage and the two dressing rooms. The auditorium ceiling was underclad with decorative fibrous plaster replicating the panelled vaulted from of the original ceiling. This ceiling with a latticed plaster grill obscured from view the original domed ventilators. The 1928 works also included the infilling of the area beneath the gallery to extend the hall and create new toilets and a strong room. The earlier toilets were converted to a kitchen.

Phase 5 (1930 - 2000):
This phase did not involve major additions, only minor alterations. The dance floor and some floor joists to the auditorium were replaced in 1934. In 1938 the flooring of the Council Chambers was upgraded.

1948: With the amalgamation of Granville within the Parramatta City area, the Town Hall became a community hall and a place for lease, although some Council staff were still located in the offices. It is probable that at this time that two ground-floor rooms were amalgamated into one large roon to provide additional library space. The conversion probably involved the removal of two walls, renewal of the flooring and the ceiling and the insertion of a large steel-framed window and narrow door and two windows. Internally these changes are supported with the walls revealing that the original fireplace and window openings have been bricked up and evidence of foundation walling beneath the floor.

Further works prior to 2000 included:
Suspended ceilings were installed in three ground-floor rooms and a plasterboard ceiling in another. The walls of some ground-floor rooms were offset clad with timber lining, presumably to cover damage from rising damp as well as provide another decoration phase although considered unsympathetic.
- The walls above the dado line in the main auditorium were clad with plasterboard and the original ventilator shafts were 'vandalised' during electrical works.
- A room was converted for use as a bar, and the room presently used as a kitchenette and the small downstairs meeting room, are thought to be later alterations.
- The kitchen has been recently upgraded to meet current health standards with stainless steel benches and tiled splashback and floors.
- Electrical services have been upgraded and modern facilities, phone, computers etc have been installed to some areas. A smoke detector system and security system has been installed.
- The galvanised steel shed and the detached WC located in the north-western corner of the site and the commercial grease arrester are intrusive elements and their removal at a future date should be considered.

In 2000 a Conservation Management Plan was prepared and has guided subsequent conservation works:
- The removal of the unsympathetic suspended ceilings, wall panelling within the original Council Chambers and the restoration and reinstallment of finishes and joinery and fireplace details.
- Repairs to the external parapet and wall claddings and membrane painting of the former Council Chambers.

In early 2000 urgent repair works including re-roofing and installing damp-proof course commenced.
Since 2000, conservation works on the Council Chambers involving both interior and exterior painting (Form, 2016 (2), 15).
Further information: Parramatta Council is committed to the conservation of the Granville Town Hall. Ongoing annual funding of $100,000 has been allocated each financial year under the Major Recreation Facilities Capital Works Program in order to implement the restoration works outlined in the Town Hall's Conservation Management Plan (2000).
Current use: Town Hall and community venue
Former use: Town Hall

History

Historical notes: The territory of the Dharug (or Sydney language grouping of) Aborginal people is thought to have stretched from the narrow neck of land between Sydney Harbour and Botany Bay, spreading in a widening arc towards and through the Blue Mountains. Within the Dharug language area were two distinct sub-groups who differed both in language and culture. One comprised those who lived by the coast and harbour, whose main food supply was fish and other types of seafood - called the "katungal" group (also known as the Eora). The other Dharug sub-group included all those who lived inland - the "paiendra", who used stone tomahawks to hunt possums in the trees (Flynn, 1995b, 10).

The Aboriginal people of Parramatta ("the place where the eels sit down") were the Burramattagal. Their land marked the border between the two Dharug cultures of the harbour and the inland (Flynn, 1995a, 7). It is uncertain as to which which Dharug grouping they belonged, but the evidence suggests that they were the westernmost Katungal clan. The early colonial commentator Watkin Tench states that the Aboriginal people of Parramatta spoke the coastal dialect. Yet, although the Burramattagal fished in the Parramatta River at the narrow western extremity of the harbour, like the Katungal, it seems likely that they derived most of their food from land and freshwater sources, like the paiendra. "Theirs was undoubtedly a borderline culture" (Flynn, 1995b, 10).

Thomas Fowlie's unpublished "History of Granville", 1918, incorporated his own observations from living in the district since 1886 as well as oral history testament from elderly residents of the area, whose memories stretched back to the first half of the nineteenth century. Fowlie described middens along Clay Cliff Creek, Duck River and the Parramatta River, suggesting that for thousands of years the Buttamattagal economy incorproated fish and shellfish. He also mentioned two significant Aboriginal camping and ceremonial sites in the area: one on the corner of Union Street and Woodville Road, Granville, just a few blocks from the current loation of the Granville Town Hall; the other within the Elizabeth Farm Estate. He noted that:

"The whole of the district and surrounding country was covered with a dense large timbered forest. Granville was especially noted for its fine trees, which were a source of wealth for years afterwards to the timber getters. . . The district being well watered and heavily timbered was naturally a great resort of native fauna. . . I have been assured by old Colonists of the vast numbers of wild ducks and other water frequenting fowls that disported in the river and creeks in the early days" (Flynn, 1995a, 162-3).

Fowlie also noted that "in those early days" of the colony, Aboriginal people camped in their preferred two sites when they visited the district to receive their allocation of blankets:

"During those visits they indulged in great revelry and held corrobborees nightly. They were patronised and visited by many of the youth of Parramatta till they became a public nuisance and had to be moved on. Those yearly visits of aborigines gradually became less in numbers . . . Till by the close of the seventies they had ceased to come" (Flynn, 1995a, 164).

When Europeans first explored the Parramatta and Duck rivers in 1788, the area now known as Granville was covered in a dense forest of stringybark, blackbutt, box and ironbark trees. The junction of the two rivers (site of the suburbs of Camellia and Rosehill) was a significant meeting place for the Cadigal from the east and western Dharug peoples, such as the Wategora, Burramattagal and Bidjigal. An Aboriginal forest track also connected the coast and the headwaters of the main river feeding the harbour, and it appears that colonial authorities adopted it to build the road connecting the settlements at Sydney Cove and Rose Hill (Parramatta). This road - the colony's major artery - ran through what is now Granville (Dictionary of Sydney staff writer, 2008).

The 10th Governor of NSW, Charles FitzRoy, set up a hunt club in Granville in the late 1840s to pursue the wild dogs that infested the area. The main road in the area was called Dog Trap Road until 1879 when it was renamed Woodville Road (Parramatta Sun, 16/9/2010). Another pest of the highway (Parramatta Road/Great Western Highway) was the bushranger, preying upon settlers. The first industry in Granville was timber-getting, with the surrounding country heavily covered with gum, box and ironbark trees. The timber, cut by pit-sawyers, was used in many Parramatta district buildings and quantities were also transported to Sydney via the Duck and Parramatta Rivers. Charcoal burners were also active in the early years, providing fuel for householders and blacksmiths' forges (Pollen & Healy, 1988, 114).

The township developed following the construction of the railway in 1855 from Sydney to Granville, which was originally called Parramatta Junction. It was initially a fruit-growing area for the colonists and well-known for its oranges and other citrus fruit (Graham Edds & Associates, 2000).

Subdivision of the area began after the railway came through in 1855, and from 1862 the (Garnham Blaxcell's) Drainwell estate was being subdivided (Pollen & Healy, 1988). By the mid-1870s Granville had become a popular site for the erection of "gentlemen's villas". John Nobbs was a major figure among the early group of gentlemen, tradesmen and workers who settled at Granville (Graham Edds & Associates, 2000).

In 1878 the locality received its own post office, which was then part of the station master's house. In 1880 the population was 372, of which 172 were male. In this era German settlers Joseph Klein and P.W. Merkell tried to establish vineyards in the area, but eventually found the land was not suited for this type of agriculture. More farmers discovered the limitations of the local soil and fruit growers complained about damage from flying foxes (bats). The only practical use for the grasslands, which replaced the original bushland, was for dairy cattle. The township retained the name of Parramatta Junction until 1880 when public meetings voted to change the name to Granville, in honour of the Earl of Granville, a former colonial secretary (Parramatta Sun, 16/9/10)/ in honour of the then British Foreign Minister, Lord Granville (Dictionary of Sydney staff writer, 2008).

A significant boost to the area came with the establishment in 1881 of the Hudson Brothers engineering works nearby at Clyde. A workforce had to be recruited and housed. On 12 February 1884, a petition calling for incorporation of the area was published in the Government Gazette, and in January 1885, Granville was officially gazetted and incorporated as a municipality. John Nobbs was elected the first Mayor, and enjoyed a reputation as the "Father of Granville". Council meetings were initially held in the School of Arts building in Good Street, north of the railway line.

In 1888 Granville Council decided to erect its own Town Hall to celebrate the centenary of European settlement in Sydney. Architect Charles A. Harding of Sydney designed the Town Hall, and Banks and Whitehurst were selected to complete the building. The foundation stone was laid by John Nobbs on 5 September 1888.

In his speech at the ceremony, John Nobbs as Mayor referred to the rapid growth of Granville over the decade. From 12 or 13 houses, it had grown to 900 buildings including 760 houses, 60 shops, two banks, three public halls including a School of Arts, seven churches, two public schools and 13 factories, of which, two were the largest in the colony: Hudson Brothers and Brunton's (Flour) Mills.

The official opening of Granville Council Chambers was held on 16 January 1889. The opening ceremony was held in the Council Chamber which was lit by two chandeliers. According to the press report, the Council Chamber was built on "true Australian lines in the matter of ventilation freely afforded by windows all around the room." It was reported that the site had cost 600 pounds, and the building's contract price was 1090 pounds without fittings. Offices for the Council Clerk, Engineer, Overseer, Inspector of Nuisances, and library were on the ground floor. A spacious staircase led to the first floor where the Council Chamber was located, 11m x 9m and Mayor's Room. A balcony, 3m x 1.5m was erected over the porch.

The auditorium (ie the main hall) was added in 1900, designed by James Whitmore Hill, a Parramatta-based architect. For later development and additions to the Town Hall, see the description under 'Modifications and dates'.

In 1949 Granville was incorporated into Parramatta City Council. The Granville Town Hall, though no longer a seat of local government, has continued to be a municipal facility and is used for local events and ceremonies.

Its interiors were viewed globally as the location for dancing scenes in "Strictly Ballroom", the internationally acclaimed Australian feature film released in 1992 (Parramatta Advertiser, 26/03/03).

(Note: Except where other texts are quoted, this historical summary is taken from the Granville Town Hall Conservation Management Plan, prepared by Graham Edds & Associates, 2000).

Granville Town Hall site has been used and maintained for local government and community use since 1889. Over the last 10 years the Town Hall has undergone considerable conservation works (Form, 2016 (2), 17).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in urban settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing civic infrastructure and amenity-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working in the public service-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Local and municipal self-governance-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Designing structures to emphasise their important roles-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - Victorian Free Classical-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - ventilation devices-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Charles Assinder Harding, architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with James Whitmore Hill, architect-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with John Nobbs, 'Father of Granville'-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Granville Town Hall is of state significance in demonstrating the development of Granville and nearby Parramatta in the late nineteenth century following the opening of the railway in 1855. The building of the Town Hall in 1888 followed closely after the incorporation of Granville as a local government district in 1885. It is an important symbol of the growth of the Granville locality and the rapid development of its sense of identity, from a minor settlement to a fully fledged local community complete with its own local government authority and its own Town Hall.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The Granville Town Hall is locally significant for its associations with the following people of note:

CHARLES ASSINDER HARDING: was born and trained as an architect in England before arriving in Sydney in 1876. He initially worked for Thomas Rowe preparing the drawings for the new Sydney Hospital in Macquarie Street. He left in 1880 to set up his own business as an architect and building surveyor. Examples of his private work include the Grand Central Coffee Palace, the Victoria Arcade, aquariums in Bondi and Manly, the Kiama Hospital and the Granville Council Chambers (1888). Between 1890 and 1904 he was an architect in the Harbours and Rivers Branch of the Department of Public Works and examples of his public work include four new lighthouses, buildings on Garden, Spectacle and Cockatoo Islands, cottages at Trial Bay Prison, government cargo stores, and additions to the pilot stations on the Macleay, Clarence and Manning Rivers.

JAMES WHITMORE HILL: was born and educated in Melbourne, and joined the Victorian Public Works Department at the time it was managed by William Wardell. In 1881, he moved to Sydney and opened an office in Elizabeth Street, then another office in Parramatta where he also lived for the rest of his life. He was active in the life of Parramatta and served as an alderman on the Council. He was a successful and prolific architect, and responsible for many domestic and commercial buildings in Parramatta and surrounding districts. Examples of his work include: the Jubilee Hall addition to Parramatta Town Hall; the Convent of the Sisters of Mercy, Parramatta; the Blacktown Council Chambers; Parramatta Primary High School (now the Arthur Phillip High School) and the main auditorium addition to the Granville Council Chambers in 1900. According to the 1907 Cyclopedia of NSW, even though domestic work formed the major part of his practice, he was also responsible for over 100 business premises, four theatres and public halls, and 11 churches and convents.

JOHN NOBBS: the first mayor and "Father of Granville", who was instrumental in the development of Granville and the construction of the Town Hall.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Granville Town Hall is of state significance as a rare and intact example of a Victorian Free Classical government building. Its size, prominence and classical details indicate its public status as the seat of local government, and its fa├žade is a confidently executed example of the Italianate Civic Palace style. It is thought to be one of only two intact nineteenth-century council chamber buildings extant in Sydney's west.

The original 1888 Council Chambers building is a fine example of local government building which uses stucco in a decorative manner to provide a veneer of respectability to a brick building.

The building has undergone extension and minor alterations during the twentieth century, and internally there is an eclectic mix of styles and fashions that reflect the growth of the building over time. Although not in public view, the auditorium has an unusual ceiling of ripple iron with decorative ventilation domes. The decorative use of ripple iron in a large auditorium is considered rare and unusual.

The Granville Town Hall is also a well-known local landmark in Granville.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Granville Town Hall is of high local significance to the Granville community. It has been used throughout its history as the venue for many major functions and festive occasions in the Granville area. Such activities have included regular meetings for social and cultural activities and these uses are ongoing. Dancing was, and still is, a regular activity held within the auditorium.

The significance of the Granville Town Hall for the wider Sydney and NSW community is reflected in its listing in the following heritage schedules: the Parramatta City Council LEP, the Register of the National Estate and the Register of the National Trust of Australia (NSW). It has been the subject of conservation work by Parramatta City Council since 2000, reflecting the community's high regard for the building.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The auditorium of the Granville Town Hall has some technical significance as an early example of extant ripple iron ceiling combining ventilation domes and exhaust cowls to provide air circulation.

The archaeological potential of the site is considered to be low. This is due to the Town Hall being the first building on the site and occupying the whole site.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
Granville Town Hall is of state significance in being a rare example of a Victorian Free Classical government building built in the nineteenth century. It is thought to be one of only two intact nineteenth-century council chamber buildings extant in Sydney's west.

The building is an almost intact, although extended, government building. It has retained its original character and nearly all its fabric, both internally and externally. The decorative use of ripple iron in a large auditorium is considered rare and unusual.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Granville Town Hall is of state significance as a largely intact example of a council chambers building (1888) with an early auditorium (1900). Few such buildings were built and it is thought to be one of only two left in Sydney's west.
Integrity/Intactness: Despite the extent of modifications to the building over its life, little original fabric has been removed and conservation works have taken place in accordance with a Conservation Management Plan (2000).
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentInquiry re 2000 CMP review tender Sep 29 2009

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0167905 Dec 03 19111125
Local Environmental Plan     
Heritage study     
National Trust of Australia register      

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAnonymous1907"C A Harding" Cyclopedia of New South Wales
WrittenAnonymous1907"J W Hill" Cyclopedia of New South Wales
WrittenFORM Architects (2016: (1))2016Statement of Environmental Effects - Alterations and Additions to Granville Town Hall, 10 Carlton Street, Granville NSW 2142
WrittenFORM Architects (2016: (2))2016Heritage Impact Statement -Granville Town Hall, Granville
Management PlanGraham Edds & Associates2000Granville Town Hall CMP
WrittenMichael Flynn1995Place of Eels (1995a)
WrittenMichael Flynn1995Parramatta and the Aboriginal People of the Sydney Region (1995b)
WrittenRichard Apperly, Robert Irvin gand Peter Reynolds1989Pictorial Guide to Identifying Australian Architecture
WrittenTerry Kass1985Granville Heritage Study
WrittenThe Dictionary of Sydney staff writer2008Granville entry, in 'The Dictionary of Sydney View detail
WrittenThe Parramatta Sun (newspaper)(author unattributed), 16/9/20102010A short history (of Granville)
WrittenThomas Fowlie1918History of Granville [the Aboriginal content of this history is summarised in appendix to Flynn, 1995a]

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5054689
File number: S91/02127


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