Sisters of Mercy Convent Group (under consideration for listing) | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

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Sisters of Mercy Convent Group (under consideration for listing)

Item details

Name of item: Sisters of Mercy Convent Group (under consideration for listing)
Other name/s: St Patrick's Catholic Church, St Catherine's Catholic College
Type of item: Built
Group/Collection: Religion
Category: Convent/Nunnery
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT201 DP1042655
PART LOT203 DP1042655
PART LOT22 DP1063169
LOT1 DP533557

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Catholic Diocese of Maitland-NewcastleGeneral29 May 15
Institute of Sisters of Mercy of Australia and Papau New GuineaReligious Organisation29 May 15

Statement of significance:

The Sisters of Mercy Convent Group (consisting of the Sisters of Mercy Convent, St Stanislaus Chapel, the former Presbytery/museum, St Patrick's Catholic Church, St Catherine's Catholic College, the Sisters of Mercy Cemetery and moveable heritage collections within the landscaped setting of the precinct) is of state heritage significance as one of the Mother Houses of the Sisters of Mercy in NSW. As the head seat of the religious order in the Hunter Valley, the Sisters of Mercy Convent Group is a particularly fine representative example of a convent precinct in NSW that demonstrates the lifestyle and religious practices of the Sisters of Mercy since their arrival in 1875.

Predominantly a welfare and educational organisation that contributed to the religious and cultural development of NSW throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the social consciousness of the Sisters of Mercy and their tireless work for the community inevitably links the convent with their social legacy. As well as being of social significance to the Sisters who resided and worked from the convent precinct (from 1875), the convent group is also significant to the greater Hunter Valley and NSW community that have been the subject of, or were influenced by, the work of the Sisters of Mercy since 1875.

The Sisters of Mercy Convent Group is of state heritage significance for its association with a number of notable religious and civic figures in NSW who have contributed to building and shaping the convent precinct into its existing form.

The Sisters of Mercy Convent Group is of state heritage significance for the research potential of its collections (particularly the Sisters of Mercy Convent library collection of books and music (including the Monsignor Peter Meagher bequeath), the Singleton Convent museum collection, the Menkens architectural drawings of the convent, the Italian marble altar and organ in St Stanislaus' Chapel and the chapel moveable heritage collection and the Sisters of Mercy Convent moveable heritage collection). The integrity of these catalogued collections demonstrates the life, work and activities of the Sisters of Mercy in NSW since their arrival in 1875 and provides detailed insight into convent life in NSW and its evolution over the past century.
Date significance updated: 24 Jan 19
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Frederick Burnhardt Menkens, Peter Joseph Gannon, Thomas Silk
Builder/Maker: James Rodgers, William Taylor, Thomas Burg
Construction years: 1856-1925
Physical description: Set amongst its manicured domestic gardens and courtyards, the Sisters of Mercy Convent Group consists of the original octagonal presbytery and convent (1856); St Patrick's Catholic Church (1860); the Sisters of Mercy Convent (1909); the St Catherine's Catholic College (1911); the St Stanislaus' Chapel (1925); and the Sisters of Mercy cemetery (1845).

The form and construction of many of the precinct buildings are similar in style - generally rectangular in plan and of brick construction with gabled and hipped roofs. Variations in finishes and colour reflect the different stages of construction over time. Brick cloisters connect several of the buildings and contribute to the appearance of the complex.

With its octagonal shape and matching eight-planed corrugated iron roof, the original presbytery and convent (1856) stands alone architecturally. With sandstone foundation walls (below ground level) supporting solid masonry wall construction, the building has a timber verandah and painted timber shutters to its windows and French doors. Internally, the museum has a two room configuration with an additional c1960 washroom on the eastern elevation (which partially obscures the octagonal form of the building). Below the original presbytery, a deep sandstone cellar remains with exposed timber beam ceiling (from floor structure above) and earth floor.

The convent (1909) is a face brick building with detailed brickwork, decorative brick arches, tuck-pointing and corbelled gables. The building footprint is a 'U-shape', consisting of a centre block, with wings upon each side. The main entrance is in the centre, topped with a belltower and the Statue of Our Lady in a niche above the front door. The stages of the convent construction are visible in its variations of colour, type and laying techniques in its separate wings. The original cast iron verandahs were replaced with the existing brick cloisters in c1940. The interior of the convent building (1909) has long been well maintained by the Sisters of Mercy. With the exception of the kitchen/laundry arrangements, and some alterations to the sleeping cells, the interior of the building is largely intact with its original form and finishes. Subsequent changes in the use of particular spaces are subtle but often evident.

St Stanislaus' Chapel (1925) has face brick facades with horizontal bandings of painted render. Arched stained glass windows adorn the chapel, either in pairings or triplet. Internally, the chapel has a mosaic tile floor with raised timber platforms housing rows of varnished timber stalls. The sanctuary is approached by Sicilian white marble steps, which lead to the Italian marble altar. Painted oil canvases have been instated within the three arched recesses on the western wall above the altar. Timber doors to the north and south lead to the Working Sacristy and Priest's Sacristy respectively.

The chapel is adorned with one of Australia's oldest chamber pipe organs (1853), originally obtained by St Peter's Anglican Church at Cook's River. The preservation of such a finely crafted instrument is rare in Australia and its retention is significant to NSW as a representative example of its stylistic type.

The Sisters of Mercy Convent Group contains a significant moveable heritage collection (generally held in the convent, chapel and convent museum). This collection includes the Library Collection of books and music (including the Monsignor Peter Meagher bequeath), the Singleton Convent museum collection, the Menkens architectural drawings of the convent, the Italian marble altar and organ in St Stanislaus' Chapel, various pieces of original furniture and the archival records of the Sisters of Mercy Singleton.

At the junction of Queen Street and Combo Lane, stands St Patrick's Catholic Church (1860). Facing west, the rendered brick faade has a parapeted gable and a pair of towers. Behind its faade, the church is built of exposed stone with stone buttresses and a slate roof with internal timber trusses and rafters. Stained glass windows throughout the church replaced earlier diamond-paned windows (1920).

Also facing west across the original presbytery, St Catherine's Catholic College (1911) is a two-storey face brick building with brick buttresses and cloisters. Sympathetically designed in keeping with the convent, the college building has a gothic-styled appearance with peaked arches and crenelated parapet.

The grounds around the convent group are well established with landscaped gardens and adorned with statues of St Joseph and St Patrick. A wide gravelled pathway leads from the wrought iron double gates to the circular drive in front of the main door.

To the east of the convent, and adjoining the town's Catholic cemetery, the Sisters of Mercy established a private cemetery in 1883. In 1975, the sandstone cross headstones were removed (due to breakages) and replaced with sandstone and granite markers, running north-south in two rows. Mother Stanislaus' grave is marked with a larger white marble cross on a plinth. The cemetery is bounded by a dwarf brick wall, palisade fence and mature plantings along its boundaries.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
The built elements of the Sisters of Mercy Convent Group have been continuously maintained in good order and respect of original details, due to the ongoing use of the site by the Sisters of Mercy. A conservation management program has been in place and a Conservation Management Plan for the site was completed in 2011.
Date condition updated:10 Feb 12
Modifications and dates: Original octagonal presbytery and convent (1856)
1873 - two storey brick addition constructed (demolished c1914-18)
c1960 - addition of washroom facility to eastern side of verandah.
1996 - roof works following hail storm.
2000 - building painted and adapted for increasing numbers of visitors (ramp for disabled access added on the western side of the verandah).
2003 - timbers in verandahs replaced and previously existing 'trapdoors' on the north and south sides of the verandas made permanent fixtures with wooden grills for ventilation.
2013 - repairs to cellar fireplaces and walls

St Patrick's Catholic Church (1860)
1875 - internal walls plastered
1875 - gallery built
1884 - wall plastering redone
1890s - chancel tiles laid
1894 - windows installed in transept
1906 - transept lengthened
1920 - original diamond-paned windows replaced with stained glass
1921 - church entry enhanced with construction of two bays with towers
1921 - original slate tiles replaced
1921 - church wall extended west to enlarge internal space
1921 - gallery rebuilt
1921 - internal ceiling zinc mouldings installed
1921 - original timber floor replaced with squares of coloured concrete
1934 - skylight to roof installed
1934 - timber altar platforms reconstructed
1945 - cedar and iron screen between choir and transept removed
1950s - lean-to confessionals added to eastern and western facades (demolished 1977)
1960s - light fittings and ceilings installed
1960s - internal rubble walls rendered
1968 - current concrete slab laid over 1921 floor
1968 - concrete ramp to nave floor level added
1977 - gallery rebuilt
1977 - eastern and western walls rebuilt of rendered brick
1977 - slate roof tiles replaced with decramastic tiles
1977 - timber altar platforms reconstructed
1977 - transept entry porch added
1993 - external stone repointed and repaired
1993 - internal render stripped and stone tiles added
1997 - roof, guttering and ventilator cowls replaced after hailstorm
1997 - stained glass windows repaired after hailstorm
1997 - dado frieze reinscribed (painted over in 1921)
1997 - decramastic roof tiles replaced with slate tiles after hailstorm
1998 - timber altar platforms reconstructed

Sisters of Mercy Convent (1909)
1925 - western cloister replaces cast iron column-supported Menkens verandah
c1925 - eastern brick verandah added
c1925 - separated kitchen built.
c1940 - wrought iron verandah balconies replaced with brick cloisters
c. 1960 - eastern balcony added with shower block
1961 - three large stained glass memorial windows (demonstrating historical theme of "mercy") replaced the sash windows on the southern end of the west wing
1996 - roof sheets and tower finial replaced following hail storm
2002 - timbers in verandahs replaced
2003/04 - modifications to allow continued occupation of the building by the Sisters, including:
* Lift to allow access between floors
* Kitchen, pantry and cool room altered
* North east sector of the east verandah modified into a sitting room
* Some walls removed between adjacent cells upper floor
* Bathroom facilities upgraded with minor modifications to upstairs plumbing
* East balcony modified to remove showers and include sun room

St Catherine's Catholic College (1911)
1970 - expansion works to convert college from boarding school to high school

St Stanislaus' Chapel (1925)
1955 - repairs due to Hunter River flood (effects can be seen on main door and choir stalls)
c1960 - addition of small confessional on south west corner of southern transept (removed 1997)
c1960 - north sanctuary painting removed and restored (damp damage)
1980s - correction of movement of north wall (1984, large Y-frames (asymmetrical Y) placed in the roof of the chapel through the west wall, and tied across chapel to stop further wall movement)
1980 - cedar transept pews replaced with paired seating
1995 - repair and restoration of organ (to original condition)
1996 - repairs of chapel roof and windows due to hailstorm
2004 - major cleaning project of three sanctuary paintings which involved removal, restoration and reinstallation
2004 - seating replaced with timber seats and kneelers
2010 - concrete around northern boundary replaced
2010-13 - repair of stained glass windows

Sisters of Mercy cemetery (1845)
c1975 - Cemetery extended to north and east.
1975 - Sandstone crosses in cemetery replaced (due to breakages) by sandstone and granite tablet markers, running north-south in two rows.
1987 - Cemetery extended to north.
Current use: Social and liturgical use (chapel worship, concerts, tours, functions, training)
Former use: Convent

History

Historical notes: As new colonial townships were established throughout NSW in the 18th and 19th centuries, religion systematically followed in an effort to maintain the moral standards and spiritual education of the frontier colonists.

Traditionally the land of the Wonnarua people (the Aboriginal people of the hills and plains), the Hunter Valley region was discovered by explorers in the early 19th century and quickly recognized for its potential for cultivation and grazing. Three successive expedition parties forged the first formal route north into the Hunter Valley from the Hawkesbury region (today's Putty Road) and, by the early 1820s, the area was settled for colonial development. The free men of these expedition parties were all awarded land grants in the new region for their efforts and Benjamin Singleton received land that, following its subdivision in the mid-1830s, would become today's Singleton.

Known in its early days as Patrick Plains, religious services were recorded in the area as early as 1826. Previously serviced by resident priests from the nearby communities of East and West Maitland, it was not until 1845 that the Catholic residents of the new Singleton township had their first local church. A simple slab and shingle building, the opening of St Augustine's Catholic Church coincided with the arrival of Father Michael Stephens in October 1845, the first resident priest for Singleton. These events marked the founding of the Catholic Parish of Singleton.

By 1848, and not long into his residency, Father Stephens was succeeded by Father John Rigney and, with his arrival, came public calls for donations towards the construction of a new and more permanent church than St Augustine's and a new presbytery for the incoming priest. Construction work on the priest's cottage commenced quickly and the octagonal building, with its deep sandstone cellar, was opened in 1856.

The Catholic Parish of Singleton welcomed a new priest, Father James Hanly, in 1857 and it was under his administration that plans for the new church, to be constructed in the vicinity of St Augustine's, began. Designs for the new St Patrick's Catholic Church were commissioned from Sydney-based architect to the Archdiocese of Sydney, William Munro and the nave and porch were opened and blessed in February 1860. Despite Munro's plans, construction of the remaining plans for the chancel and sacristy were deferred until the end of the 1860s when prominent local architect J.W. Pender was commissioned to complete the architectural intentions for the church and expand its facilities. By 1875, the new western gallery was complete and the chancel, sacristy and choir transept were finalised by 1881. Later alterations to the church were undertaken by architects Frederick Menkens (1894, 1906) and Thomas Silk (1921).

While the Catholic Parish of Singleton was in its early days, it maintained the traditional responsibility of many religious orders in providing and supervising the education of much of the community's children. It was at this time though that the 1848 Education Act was passed in NSW which saw a greater involvement of the state government into the provision of educational facilities and services. As control over curriculum, educational funding and operational requirements shifted away from religious organisations to government bodies, and state aid was withdrawn from denominational schools, religious schools soon looked to install new teachers who wouldn't require high salaries for their work. The religious orders of Britain and Ireland, renowned for their service to the poor, sick and destitute, were often looked to for assistance by the Australian parishes.

With rules and constitutions approved by the Holy See of Rome, the Congregation of the Sisters of Mercy had been established in Baggot Street, Dublin, Ireland on 12 December 1831 by the Venerable Catherine McAuley. Not originally intending to establish a religious order but living in a time when there were no government-sponsored social benefits for the people, McAuley had dedicated much of her life to nurse, educate, shelter and comfort the poor and the sick. McAuley's compassionate work attracted similarly-minded women and the Sisters of Mercy soon expanded with foundations being established across Ireland and England where their services were needed. By Sister McAuley's death in 1841, twelve foundations of the Sisters of Mercy had been set up in Ireland, a further two in England and, before too long, the Sisters had spread throughout the English-speaking world. The Congregation of the Sisters of Mercy had arrived in Australia in 1847, establishing the first House of Mercy in Perth, Western Australia.

To assist with what was considered to be an educational crisis, the largest contingent of 'founding mothers' left Ireland for NSW, for Singleton at the invitation of His Lordship Most Reverend James Murray, the first resident Bishop of Maitland. Led by Mother Mary Stanislaus Kenny, six Sisters and three Postulants bravely left Ennis, Ireland to make the eight-week journey across the seas to Australia. Arriving on 31 August 1875 and taking up residence in the octagonal presbytery at Singleton (having been recently extended with a two storey brick addition in 1873 [later demolished c1914-18]), the Sisters quickly took over the operation of the parish school and continued their compassionate work visiting the sick and poor of the region.

From the extended presbytery (now the convent), the Sisters conducted much of their work including opening an orphanage where the children lived and learnt alongside the Sisters. At the convent, the Sisters also continued their tradition of establishing a select school for girls (the beginnings of St Catherine's College) which was a boarding school for the daughters of parishioners to be educated in languages, elocution, arts, mathematics, posture, dancing, music and writing.

For the Hunter Valley region, the Singleton convent became one of the Mother House of the Sisters of Mercy in NSW. In recognition of the emerging prominence of the Sisters and their work, land was soon purchased and plans for the construction of a purpose-built convent were underway. German-born architect Frederick Menkens was tasked with designing the convent to be the primary residence of the Sisters and to accommodate visiting Sisters on retreat. To be built alongside St Patrick's Church and amongst its established gardens, the convent was intended to be an architecturally refined adornment to its picturesque garden setting. Constructed in four stages, the Sisters were able to move into the first wing in 1893 which also accommodated the orphanage and girls school.

The following stages were undertaken gradually, as time and funding permitted, and the Convent of the Sisters of Mercy was officially completed in 1909 (with the final stage overseen by Menkens architectural partner F.G. Castleden due to illness). To complement the newly finished convent, Castleden was engaged to build St Catherine's College (adjacent to the original octagonal presbytery) which was completed in 1911. A boarding school for many years, St Catherine's College was expanded under the architectural guidance of Peter Gannon in the 1970s and converted to a high school. It was also during this period that the teaching responsibilities of the Sisters began to decline. By the mid-1990s, the teaching staff at St Catherine's College no longer included any Sisters of Mercy.

During the early years of the convent, the Sisters of Mercy used St Patrick's Catholic Church as their chapel. However, to mark the Sister's Golden Jubilee (their 50th year since arriving in Singleton), the St Stanislaus' Chapel was commissioned from architect Thomas Silk (who had also undertaken work to St Patrick's Church in 1921). Opened in 1925, the brick and slate roof chapel was a grand and highly detailed building that reflected the spiritual values of the Sisters of Mercy and their work. With its overwhelming light and space, the chapel was adorned with one of Australia's oldest chamber pipe organs (1853), originally obtained by St Peter's Anglican Church at Cook's River and later transferred to the Anglican Church of Saints Simon and Jude in Surry Hills in 1880.

Reflecting the tranquil nature of the life of a Sister, the grounds of the convent also contain a consecrated cemetery which is the final resting place of many of the Sisters of Mercy who have resided and worked at Singleton. Consecrated in 1845, the cemetery buried its first Sister in 1883 and interred the remains of its founding mother, Mother Mary Stanislaus Kenny in 1910.

Although the Sisters of Mercy in Australia was once a thriving community with a growing population that established branch houses, schools and community facilities throughout the country, the order witnessed a definitive social shift away from religious life in the mid-20th century. By 1965, the Singleton convent was receiving fewer new Sisters and its existing population was growing increasingly older. To accommodate its aging community, the former Novitiate building (1933) was converted to a nursing home in the 1960s and the more permanent facility, Mercy Nursing Home, was opened in 1984.

The Convent of Mercy ceased operation as a convent in 2014.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Migration-Activities and processes associated with the resettling of people from one place to another (international, interstate, intrastate) and the impacts of such movements Settling in country towns-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. College boarding house-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Catholic school-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Convent-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Religion-Activities associated with particular systems of faith and worship Practising Catholicism-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Birth and Death-Activities associated with the initial stages of human life and the bearing of children, and with the final stages of human life and disposal of the dead. Commemorative avenue of trees (non-war-related)-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Sisters of Mercy Convent Group is of state heritage significance as one of the Mother Houses of the Sisters of Mercy in NSW. As the head seat of the religious order in the Hunter Valley, the work and activities of the Sisters of Mercy stemmed from the convent at Singleton and it was from here that branch houses throughout NSW and New Zealand were established.

The convent has been in use as the residence of the Sisters of Mercy and the centre of their religious training since the arrival of the first Sisters in 1875. From the convent at Singleton, the compassionate work of the Sisters of Mercy contributed significantly to the religious and cultural development of NSW throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The Sisters of Mercy Convent Group is of state heritage significance for its association with a number of notable religious and civic figures in NSW.

The religious history of the site was greatly influenced by the work of Father John Rigney (responsible for the construction of the octagonal presbytery and who went on to serve as the Archdeacon of the Metropolitan See of Sydney) and Mother Mary Stanislaus Kenny (who led the largest contingent of 'founding mothers' from Ireland to Australia, to the Singleton convent, in the 19th century).

Architecturally, the religious precinct is the work of a collection of notable architects, including: William Munro (1860, St Patrick's Catholic Church); Frederick Menkens (1892-1909, Sisters of Mercy Convent; 1894 and 1906 alterations to St Patrick's Catholic Church); F.G. Castleden (later stages of convent construction; 1911, St Catherine's Catholic College); J.W. Pender (1870s-81, alterations to St Patrick's Catholic Church); Thomas Silk (1921, alterations to St Patrick's Catholic Church; 1925, convent chapel) and Peter Gannon (1970s, alterations to St Catherine's Catholic College). Collectively, these architects have designed, adapted and successively created the built precinct that exists today.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Sisters of Mercy Convent Group is an elegant collection of buildings and built elements set in a picturesque garden environment. Reflecting the tranquil and serene life of the Sisters of Mercy, the precinct is substantially intact and well maintained.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The Sisters of Mercy Convent Group is of state heritage significance for its social significance to the Sisters of Mercy that have resided and worked from the convent precinct (since 1875), for the residents of its on-site orphanage (1877-1910), for the boarders and students of St Catherine's Catholic College (1911-present), for the members of the Catholic Parish of Singleton (1845-present) and for the greater Hunter Valley and NSW community that have been the subject of, or were influenced by, the work of the Sisters of Mercy since 1875.

Predominantly a welfare and educational organisation, the work of the Sisters of Mercy has always been focussed on caring for the poor, sick and destitute members of our community. Education, particularly of women, is also a key responsibility of the Sisters of Mercy. The social consciousness of the Sisters and their tireless work for the community inevitably links the convent with their social legacy.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The Sisters of Mercy Convent Group is of state heritage significance for the research potential of its collections. These collections include the Sisters of Mercy Convent library collection of books and music (including the Monsignor Peter Meagher bequeath), the Singleton Convent museum collection, the Menkens architectural drawings of the convent, the Italian marble altar and organ in St Stanislaus' Chapel and the chapel moveable heritage collection and the Sisters of Mercy Convent moveable heritage collection.

The integrity of this catalogued collection demonstrates the life, work and activities of the Sisters of Mercy in NSW since their arrival in 1875 and provides detailed insight into convent life in NSW and its evolution over the past century.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The Sisters of Mercy Convent is one of the Mother Houses of the Sisters of Mercy in NSW. As the head seat of the religious order in the Hunter Velley, the work and activities of the Sisters of Mercy stemmed from the convent at Singleton and it was from here that branch houses throughout NSW and New Zealand were established.

The first branch house was opened at Gunnedah in 1879, followed by Murrurundi (1879), Raymond Terrace (1881), Morpeth (1883), Lambton (1883), Hamilton (1884), East Maitland (1884), Branxton, Scone and Broken Hill (1889). Responsible for the design of the Singleton convent, architect Frederick Menkens also designed the convents at Singleton, Hamilton, Branxton and Gunnedah.

Although the Sisters of Mercy Convent in Singleton is the Mother House for the Hunter Valley region, it is not considered to be a rare example of a convent group in NSW.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
As one of the Mother Houses of the Sisters of Mercy in NSW, the Sisters of Mercy Convent Group is of state heritage significance as a particularly fine representative example of a convent precinct in NSW. A largely intact and well-maintained precinct, the convent group is an elegant collection of buildings and built elements that demonstrate the lifestyle and religious practices of the Sisters of Mercy in NSW since their arrival in 1875.
Integrity/Intactness: The site has a high degree of intactness.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - Under consideration for SHR/IHO listingSisters of Mercy 14 Oct 11   
Heritage Act - Icons Project Nomination for SHR listing  24 May 04   
Local Environmental Plan  05 Jul 96 081 
National Trust of Australia register  5086   
National Trust of Australia register  5115   
National Trust of Australia register  5156   
Royal Australian Institute of Architects register     
Register of the National EstateNom. 15/06/1984001439 & 00144025 Mar 86 AHC 

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenCoassociates Pty Ltd2010Singleton Rural Heritage Study including a reviw of Singleton Conservation Area
WrittenDr Pam Como2011Laughter, Love and Loyalty: One hundred years of Mercy education at St. Catherine's College, Singleton 1875-1975
WrittenJohn Stiller1983Convent of Mercy, Singleton, NSW: Detailed documentation of pipe organ installed 1925
WrittenSister Colleen Kelly RSM1997A Journey Through Light and Shadow
WrittenSister Colleen Kelly RSM1975His Mercy Endures Forever, 1875-1975
WrittenSuters Architects2011Conservation Management Plan, Sisters of Mercy Convent, Queen Street Singleton NSW View detail
WrittenSuters Architects1999St Patrick’s Catholic Church, Singleton, NSW: Conservation Management Plan

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5055552
File number: EF14/28898


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