Ultimo Tramways Power House (under consideration) | NSW Environment, Energy and Science

Culture and heritage

Heritage

Ultimo Tramways Power House (under consideration)

Item details

Name of item: Ultimo Tramways Power House (under consideration)
Other name/s: Ultimo Power House, Ultimo Power Station; Powerhouse Museum
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Utilities - Electricity
Category: Electricity Generator/Power Station - coal/gas/oil
Primary address: 500 Harris Street, Ultimo, NSW 2007
Parish: St Andrew
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: Sydney
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
PART LOT1 DP631345

Boundary:

The boundary is within the property boundary for Lot 1 DP 631345. The boundary comprises the four main interconnected heritage buildings being the Engine House and Turbine Hall, Second Boiler House, Office Building and Switch Hall.
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
500 Harris StreetUltimoSydneySt AndrewCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Trustees of the Museum of Applied Arts and ScienceState Government 

Statement of significance:

The former Ultimo Tramways Power House is potentially of State significance historically for being the first large state-owned electricity generating station in NSW and the original generating station for the supply of electricity to power the electric tramway network throughout Sydney. It was one of the largest and most important generating stations in NSW for many years. It has associations with the electrification of the suburban tramway and railway systems and with the general reticulation of electrical power in Sydney. It was the site where most major technological advancements in electrical generation, including steam turbines and large-scale, alternating-current generation, were trialled by NSW electricity authorities. The station also played a major part in the development of the Ultimo/Pyrmont area.

These power station buildings are potentially of State significance aesthetically as a landmark group of buildings which relate closely to the visual and architectural industrial context of the area.
Date significance updated: 24 Feb 20
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: NSW Railway Commissioners/NSW Department of Public Works
Builder/Maker: J. Stewart and Co. Sydney
Construction years: 1897-1987
Physical description: The remains of the Ultimo Tramways Power House principally comprise four interconnected buildings which were the Engine Room and Turbine Hall, the (2nd) Boiler House, the Office Building and the Switch House. Equipment from the power station phase has been removed from the interiors and exteriors of the buildings and the buildings survive largely as external shells, adapted to the new use as a Museum.

OFFICE BUILDING
The Office Building is a three storey symmetrical building, 30rm wide and 14m deep, with seven bays, built in a simplified Italian Renaissance Classical style. It faces William Henry Street and is partly obscured by the William Henry Street Bridge. The rusticated stone base supports a stone plinth on which sits the brick superstructure. The articulation continues in the form of brick pilasters with a sandstone entablature, above which is a brick parapet. On the ground floor, window mullions are in the form of classical pilasters, while on the top floor they are plain. Beneath each window is a spandrel infilled with bricks in herringbone pattern. The frontispiece is in the form of an aedicule two stories high, with large-scale stone pilasters on stone pedestals, surmounted by a pediment. Within the frontispiece is an entrance having semicircular arch with a console keystone. The principal feature in the aedicule is the spandrel which identifies the building's ownership as the New South Wales Government Transport Department (NSWGTD). Surrounding the name of the building is a band of lightning bolts, a stylised representation of electricity, which passes behind a decorated floriated crest incorporating the Southern Cross. The spandrel was once surmounted by a leadlight window which bore the State Coat of Arms. On the top floor, each pair of pilasters, on the east and west ends, is gathered over a semi-circular opening which makes the semi-circular arched windows appear recessed. The building has a distinguished architectural composition shown in brickwork, windows and facades. The bricks are very fine plastic-moulded and have a warm red-brown colour and pointed with a light red-brown mortar. The work throughout is English bond except in the spandrels where it is herringboned. The robust cedar window joinery is very fine and is consistent with the time of building. The repetition of the pilasters, spandrels and windows on the north, east, and west facades adds to the careful ornamentation of the building. All that remains of the old boiler house on the eastern side of the Office Building is the remains of the first chimney stack and the flashing outline of the gable roof in the brickwork of the second boiler house.

THE ENGINE ROOM AND TURBINE HALL
Contemporaneous with the Office Building but different in concept and design is the Engine Room. It is approximately 30m wide and 30m deep and is, in effect, an extension of the Office Building. The bricks, still laid in English bond, are brown-grey and the character of the building is much more utilitarian. The pilasters are strengthening devices and divide the west front (the building's only facade) into five bays with paired windows. The openings of the metal framed windows are segmental-arched and each brick sill runs the length of the window only and not the length of the bay, as on the office building. The facade is completed by a parapet which conceals the box guttering. Beneath the parapet is a double stringcourse of brickwork.

The Turbine Hall, an extension eastwards of the Engine Room, is a very simple, very strong expression of the utilitarian architecture of the early 20th century and one of the prime large examples of Edwardian industrial architecture in Sydney. Its size, 56m x 31m, reflects the size of the turbo alternators it was designed to house. The facade is divided into eight bays, which are further proportioned by a horizontal band which divides the facade into sixteen elements. The west facade's principal quality is its sheer scale which is enhanced by very carefully controlled simplicity. Emphasising the main articulation of the facade is a moulded stone stringcourse at the sill level of the upper windows and a moulded stone cornice capping the top of the parapet. The main elements are the very tall, semi-circular headed windows.
These main windows have stone sills and the window bays, flanked by pilasters, terminate in stepped brick corbels and are surmounted by a stone gable cornice.

THE SWITCH HOUSE
The Switch House is a brick building, three stories on the east and two stories above ground level on the west. The west facade is divided into seven bays, the northernmost of which is given emphasis by means of a dentillated gable which incorporates a centrally-placed circular motif with herringbone infill. The remainder of the building features a dentillated segmented extension of the parapet. The brickwork between each pair of windows extends even higher and terminates in dentillated bracketed caps. All dressings, sills, lintels and caps are of rendered concrete.

THE SECOND BOILER HOUSE
The Second Boiler House is the largest building in the complex, 83m long and 23m wide, and has the largest continuous facade to the east. The three tiers of windows, arranged in thirteen bays, are a vigorous architectural solution to the problem of dealing with a very tall facade. The height from string course to plinth is much greater than on the west facade of the Turbine Hall, which it complements. The thirteen bays are evident on the top tier of the building, above the string course. Below that, the fourth and fifth bays from the north end were combined to form a tripartite entrance bay, which allowed access to rail trucks on the east siding. The south facade of the Boiler House, although abutting the Turbine Hall and matching it in size, was treated somewhat differently, preserving the individuality of the building. The pilasters, their terminations in stepped corbels and the gable cornices are the same but the windows are smaller, arranged in two tiers and segmental-headed, as on the east facade.
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Good Condition
Date condition updated:02 Dec 15
Modifications and dates: Numerous modifications between 1899 and 1988. See History
Further information: Adapted to house the Powerhouse Museum, the building envelopes
are largely intact but most of the internal fittings and fixtures have been removed.
Current use: Museum of Arts and Technology
Former use: Aboriginal land, farm, commercial/residential, Electricity generating station

History

Historical notes: The site sits on the land originally occupied by Aboriginal people of the Cadigal, Gommerigal and/or Wangal clans of the Eora Nation.

Ultimo forms the southern half of the Pyrmont peninsula, bounded by Darling Harbour on the east, Blackwattle Bay on the west and Broadway on the south. It became part of the estate of the surgeon John Harris in 1803. The sandstone ridge that is the spine of the Pyrmont peninsula was covered at the Ultimo end by rich alluvial soil. This had attracted some early market gardens, but Harris's vision for his property was not development, but the creation of a country seat.

Industries were attracted to the watercourses in the area and Harris moved out to rural land further west in 1821and his house was rented out. By the 1840s the property was being surrounded by industry, small commercial properties and abbatoirs toward Blackwattle Creek. From the 1850s onwards the area was filled with cramped quarters, people living cheek by jowl with domestic animals, with no water or sewerage, but any amount of flooding and sewage. Refuse and offal from the slaughter yards might be taken out on the tide, but often remained to rot on the mudflats.

In 1859 (after John Harris' death in 1838) the Harris family distributed land to a number of second- and third-generation family members. There were a few cottage-dwellers dotted around, using the land under grace and favour to run a few cattle or do a little local quarrying, while contemporary reports indicate that the area was so unsettled as to remain hospitable to Aboriginal people who still frequented the area.

The opening of the Pyrmont Bridge in 1859 made the peninsula more accessible, but this also had the effect of allowing traffic to bypass the Ultimo end of it. Local protest persuaded the bridge company to include a central swing span in the bridge, so that ships could still get to the upper reaches of Darling Harbour, and in 1853 the Sydney Railway Company acquired seven acres (three hectares) from the Harris estate, to build a rail terminus and goods yards. The line was opened in 1855, but as it did not extend to connect with the Pyrmont Bridge, the volume of goods passing through the yards was slight.

In the second half of the nineteenth century, much of the western side of the peninsula was quarried for stone to build Sydney's finest buildings.

In 1892 Sydney Technical College, on Mary Ann Street, was built, while the adjoining Technological Museum, fronting Harris Street, was opened the following year. The college expanded into surrounding streets and newer buildings, eventually taking in the Harris' old Ultimo House. As the new century approached, the college, in various incarnations, provided a new focus for industrial Ultimo, and opened up the possibility of further education through night classes in practical and applied sciences for many locals.
(The Dictionary of Sydney)

The development of the tramway public transport system had its beginnings in a horse drawn tramway along Pitt Street between Circular Quay and the Redfern Railway Terminal, which opened in 1869. A steam powered network developed from the 1870s, first running through the city only, then rapidly expanding as a commuter service from suburban areas. Steep topography saw the addition of cable drawn trams in North Sydney and towards Rose Bay from the city during the 1880s. In 1893, the first complete electrically-powered tramway line opened on the north shore and its success led to the decision to adopt electric power for the tramway system overall. A single large electricity generating station was deemed necessary to provide this power and the first stage of the Ultimo Power Station opened in December, 1899.

The first of the all-electric tramcar sheds, Ultimo Tram Depot, opened at the same time at the south end of the Power Station site. Conversion of the tramlines proceeded rapidly and expansion of the power station followed in stages. In 1905, Ultimo Power House was the first place where turbine-driven alternators were tried in Australia and it was, until the 1940s, the location where the first examples of most major developments in power generation technology, including mechanical boiler feed and, later, the use of pulverised coal, were tried in Australia. It was also amongst the largest of any generating stations operating in Australia till the 1940s. It was a major employer and its function of power generation brought further development to the surrounding area. At the same time, its landmark chimneys were the source of ash fallout problems for local people.

In the 1920s, electrification of the suburban railway led to substantial extension and re-equipping of Ultimo Power House and the White Bay Power Station also commenced operations as the second of the New South Wales (NSW) Railway and Tramways Department generating stations. These two worked closely together until the1950s, when all the power generation facilities of the state were brought together under the NSW Electricity Commission, a central government authority formed to deal with the chronic post-war power shortages in NSW. As the interconnected network expanded and new generation power stations were completed and brought on line, Ultimo's old machinery and city location saw its progressive redundancy and it closed in 1964. Allied to this was the closure of the tramway system, in favour of motor busses, which was underway from the 1950s and was complete by 1963. The power station was then stripped and lay dormant until the decision in 1979 to use it as the new location for the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences (MAAS) - formerly the Technological Museum.

The power station was substantially modified for its use as the Powerhouse Museum. The interior of the buildings were cleared, new internal floors and spaces created and new buildings were erected on the western side. Key visual elements such as the industrial chimneys were demolished. The Ultimo tram depot, adjacent to the power station, opened as Stage One in 1981; this later became offices, workshops, laboratories and storage for the MAAS in the power house buildings. The Powerhouse Museum proper opened to the public in March 1988, as the flagship exhibition space of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences. The NSW State Government has signalled the closure of the museum and its move, with the collection, to a new purposebulit facility at Parramatta. The Ultimo site is suggested for redevelopment but keeping a cultural use and presence. Create Infrastructure is the Government agency managing the potential adaptive re-use and re-activation of the former MAAS site.

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Other open space-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Cultural - Coasts and coastal features supporting human activities-
1. Environment-Tracing the evolution of a continent's special environments Environment - naturally evolved-Activities associated with the physical surroundings that support human life and influence or shape human cultures. Changing the environment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Sydney and Australian Landmark-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of institutions - productive and ornamental-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes of industrial production-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Developing local landmarks-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Events-Activities and processes that mark the consequences of natural and cultural occurences Providing a venue for significant events-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Industry-Activities associated with the manufacture, production and distribution of goods Energy supply industry-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Industry-Activities associated with the manufacture, production and distribution of goods Energy supply industry-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Building settlements, towns and cities-National Theme 4
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Adapted heritage building or structure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 1820s-1850s land grants-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from suburban to urban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Sub-division of large estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early farming (Cattle grazing)-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Administering and alienating Crown lands-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Changing land uses - from rural to suburban-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Resuming private lands for public purposes-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Early Sydney Street-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Subdivision of urban estates-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th century suburban developments-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 20th Century infrastructure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 20th Century infrastructure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages 19th Century Infrastructure-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Creating landmark structures and places in suburban settings-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Suburban Consolidation-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Shaping coastal settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Impacts of railways on urban form-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Developing suburbia-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working at enforced labour-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working complex machinery and technologies-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working on public infrastructure projects-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Adult Education-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Community education - adults, school excursions-
6. Educating-Educating Education-Activities associated with teaching and learning by children and adults, formally and informally. Maintaining libraries and museums for educational purposes-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. State government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Local government-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing electricity-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - conserving cultural and natural heritage-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - providing museums-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - administration of land-
7. Governing-Governing Government and Administration-Activities associated with the governance of local areas, regions, the State and the nation, and the administration of public programs - includes both principled and corrupt activities. Developing roles for government - building and operating public infrastructure-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Industrial buildings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Applying architectural design to utlilitarian structures-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Visiting heritage places-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Going to a museum-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Activities associated with relaxation and recreation-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Developing collections of items-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Leisure-Includes tourism, resorts.
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Community volunteering-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Places of informal community gatherings-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Developing and maintaining a local museum-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Developing and maintaining a local museum-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Social institutions-Activities and organisational arrangements for the provision of social activities Developing local clubs and meeting places-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
Ultimo Tramways Power House most likely meets this criterion of State significance because it was the first large state-owned electricity generating station in NSW and the original generating station for the supply of electricity to power the electric tramway network throughout Sydney.

It was one of the largest and most important generating stations in NSW from 1899 -1963, and has associations with the electrification of the suburban tramway and railway systems and with the general reticulation of electrical power in Sydney.

It was the site where most major technological advancements in electrical generation, including steam turbines and large-scale, alternating-current generation, were trialled by NSW electricity authorities.

The station also played a major part in the development of the Ultimo/Pyrmont area.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
Ultimo Tramways Power House most likely meets this criterion of State significance because the power station buildings are a landmark group of buildings which relate closely to the visual and architectural industrial context of the area. The Boiler House building was, in its day, one of the largest brickwork structures in the state and the chimneys were significant Sydney landmarks for seventy years.
Integrity/Intactness: The former Ultimo Tramways Power House complex has been substantially altered since its historic use and was a derelict asset open to the sky when acquired and transformed into the MAAS in 1988. The main heritage brick buildings, including the Boiler Room and Turbine Hall, were largely stripped of remaining equipment and all associated moveable heritage elements, with new floors laid, roofing elements, and demolition of significant core elements (such as the chimneys), reducing the aesthetic appearance of the precinct. The 1988 Wran building, and other additions associated with adaptive reuse of the site, further impacted the heritage core buildings and their legibility and interpretation of former use.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Statutory InstrumentNominate for State Heritage Register (SHR) 

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentCMP The Powerhouse Museum, prepared by Architectural projects for Powerhouse Museum, dated November 2003. Copy of CMP held in Heritage Office Library - not endorsed or reviewed for endorsement Jun 29 2005

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - Under consideration for SHR/IHO listingUltimo Power House nominated for SHR listing by Na    
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register     
Local Environmental PlanCity of SydneyI203114 Dec 12   

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenDon Godden and Associates1984Ultimo Power House - History and Technology
WrittenFitzgerald, Deborah2015'Powerhouse is coming to town - Mega Museum to be moved to the West' View detail
WrittenGlendenning L1982The Power House Ultimo
WrittenGodden Mackay Pty Ltd1994Tramway Workshops, Depots and Substations - Survey and Assessment
WrittenHore, Allison2019'Powerhouse move on new timetable'
WrittenInstitution of Engineers Australia1994Historic Engineering Marker - Nomination Report
WrittenLoussikian, Kylar and Hutchinson, Samantha2020Hollywood historian to assess a rich heritage
ElectronicPeter Lonergan and Hugo Chan2020Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo. Independent heritage assessment commissioned by the Heritage Council of NSW View detail
WrittenWinkworth, Kylie2019Policy, Power and the Cultural and Heritage Values of the Powerhouse Museum

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5055576
File number: EF15/19906


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