Luna Park Precinct | NSW Environment & Heritage

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Luna Park Precinct

Item details

Name of item: Luna Park Precinct
Other name/s: Entrance Face and Towers, Crystal Palace, Coney Island, Alfred Street Entrance, Wild Mouse, Sandstone cliff,
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Recreation and Entertainment
Category: Funfair
Location: Lat: -33.8475651213 Long: 151.2099629940
Primary address: 1 Olympic Drive, Milsons Point, NSW 2061
Parish: Willoughby
County: Cumberland
Local govt. area: North Sydney
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Metropolitan
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT2 DP1066900
LOT3 DP1066900
LOT4 DP1066900
LOT12 DP1113743
LOT1247 DP48514
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
1 Olympic DriveMilsons PointNorth SydneyWilloughbyCumberlandPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
Luna Park Reserve TrustState Government 

Statement of significance:

The site now known as Luna Park Precinct is historically significant as the site of the first regular ferry transport between Sydney and the North Shore, and later the busiest ferry wharf on the Harbour, with the exception of Circular Quay. The Milsons Point site was a major transport interchange during the later part of the 19th Century connecting ferry, train and trams. The site later became crucial to the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Fabrication and assembly of steel components for the bridge was done on site at the 1925 Dorman Long and Company workshops.
After removal of the workshops the Luna Park amusement park was constructed on the site in 1935 and became a centre for recreation for generations of Sydney residents and visitors. Luna Park has strong association with former park artists Rupert Browne, Peter Kingston, Gary Shead, Sam Lipson, Arthur Barton, Richard Liney and Martin Sharp. Martin Sharp is an important Sydney artist with an international reputation who was influential in the Australian Pop Art movement in the 1960's and 70's.
The Luna Park Precinct has important aesthetic values in its own right, a celebration of colour and fantasy originally in the art deco style, and as a landmark on Sydney Harbour. Luna Park occupies an important and prominent location on the northern foreshore of Sydney Harbour and is highly visible from Circular Quay and the Opera House and other key harbour vantage points. Luna Park is one of Sydney's most recognisable and popular icons, the Luna Park face in particular is an instantly recognisable symbol of Sydney. The prominence of Luna Park is enhanced by the high quarried cliff face and the fig trees which provide a landscaped backdrop together with the way it is framed by the Harbour Bridge when viewed from the east.
Luna Park includes a rare collection of murals and amusements that demonstrate mid 20th century popular and traditional technologies. These have been complemented by the art works of Martin Sharp, Richard Liney, Gary Shead and Peter Kingston some of which survive as moveable items associated with the park and stored at other locations such as the Powerhouse Museum.
Luna Park is important as a place of significance to generations of the Australian Public, in particular Sydney siders who have strong memories and associations with the place. Its landmark location at the centre of Sydney Harbour together with its recognisable character has endowed it with a far wider sense of ownership, granting it an iconic status. Luna Park received considerable attention following the tragic Ghost Train fire of 1979 and the ensuing short term closure of the park. It became the focus of considerable public action when it was threatened with redevelopment and remains a subject of high public interest.
Luna Park Precinct has very high potential as an archaeological resource that is likely to yield information about all phases of occupation of the site. In particular evidence of the Dorman Long wharf and the railway.
Luna Park is unique as a rare example of an amusement park and fantasy architecture constructed in the 1930s art deco style. The original murals and design of Luna Park demonstrate an amusement park aesthetic that was originally inherited from America and reinterpreted in an Australian context.
The Luna Park precinct includes many individual elements of significance. The most significant elements are the Entrance Face and Towers; Midway; the Rotor; Coney Island; Crystal Palace; Wild Mouse; the Cliff Face and the Fig Trees.
(Sourced from Luna Park Conservation Plan Godden Mackay 1992)
Date significance updated: 15 Oct 09
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Rupert Browne and Herman Phillips.
Builder/Maker: Stuart Brothers Ltd, David Atkins, Ted Hopkins
Construction years: 1935-
Physical description: Luna Park includes several structures and items of significance, most notable are:

The Entrance Face and Towers:
The first entrance to Luna Park was constructed in 1935 based on the design of the entrance to Melbourne's Luna Park at St Kilda. It consisted of two towers with an immense face between them and people entered through the gaping mouth. The face has been remodelled several times and its character has evolved over the years. Exposed to salt air the entrance face has required major maintenance work. Each time this has been carried out the facial expression has altered. The whole entrance was demolished in 1988. The present entrance face and towers were completed in January 1995. The 36m high towers are replicas of the original 1935 Art Deco design. The expression of the present face is based on the 1960 face designed by Arthur Barton. The towers are constructed of steel frames, clad in fibre cement sheets, on brick bases. The face is made of fibreglass and foam. (SHFA Database Number: 4500504)

The Midway:
An important aspect of the park was the way it was laid out with a central spine that followed the shore line. "The Midway was where it all happened. It was the street, the forum, the piazza, the stage and the audience. The Park had been laid out so that no attraction protruded into the Midway except the Windmill which marked its only bend."
The windmill was later replaced by the light house. Pedestrian traffic travelled up and down this spine. After the first season canvas awnings were added along the Midway. It was the place where street theatre and entertainment took place. (Sam Marshall, "Luna Park Just for Fun")

Rotor:
The Rotor was designed by German engineer Ernst Hoffmeister in the late 1940s.The Rotor is a large, upright barrel, rotated at 30 revolutions per minute. The rotation of the barrel creates a centrifugal force equivalent to between 1 and 1.5 g. Once the barrel has attained full speed, the floor is retracted, leaving the riders stuck to the wall of the drum. At the end of the ride cycle, the drum slows down and gravity takes over. The riders slide down the wall slowly. Although Hoffmeister was the designer, most Rotors were constructed under license. The first Luna Park Rotor was built by Ted Hopkins in 1951. Three Rotors were built in Australia based on Hoffmeister's design. All had been demolished or destroyed by the 1980s, although a slightly redesigned Rotor was rebuilt for Luna Park Sydney in 1995, which is still in operation. (Wikipedia)

Coney Island (also Funnyland):
One of the original 1935 buildings of Luna Park, Coney Island is believed to have been erected firstly at Luna Park, Glenelg, although this has not been substantiated. It is a rectangular building with the longest side running east-west. It has a corrugated iron hip roof with its external walls forming parapet walls around each side. The basic structure of Coney Island is virtually identical to that of the Crystal Palace. It is similar in width but slightly shorter, having twelve bays (Godden Mackay Logan 1999: 31-33). Internally the steelwork of the main structure is concealed by mural panels or decorated motifs which were physically conserved during 1994. The roof purlins and sheeting are exposed. The industrial light fittings are suspended from the roof. The open space contains large and small fun devices, giant slides 1-4, joy wheel, turkey trot and barrels of fun (Godden Mackay Logan 1999: 35- 42). (SHFA Database Number 4500504)

Crystal Palace (also Dodgem Building):
The Crystal Palace is located adjacent to the site of the approach tracks and locomotive depot of the original Milsons Point Railway Station (1893 10 1924). The essential form of the Crystal Palace is a large rectangular thirteen-bay steel-framed structure, two storeys in height with a hip roof behind extended walls. The end bays are framed with heavy Oregon members and the roof ends above them are gabled hips with louvered ventilation in the gables. The exteriors were originally symmetrical, the two long elevations having emphatic central elements and end pavilions. Parapets conceal the main roof; these are crenulated except for the tower motifs where chamfered blocks of timber, imitating machicolation, have been planted on. The cladding, once predominantly asbestos cement, has been replaced in the early 1990s works with fibre-cement. The centre of the east or Midway entrance elevation has a steep hipped roof between tall pinnacles, while the four 'towers' of the end pavilions have steep pyramid roofs (Godden Mackay Logan 1999: 47-51). ( SHFA Database Number 4500504)

Wild Mouse:
Located adjacent to Coney Island, the Wild mouse is a small roller coaster. The track is comprised of laminated timber with a steel rail constructed on a concrete platform elevated above the ground. The Wild Mouse cars hold two people seated one behind the other. The ride moves back and forth and up and down along its rectangular plan It was designed to have steep gradients, sharp turns and give the rider the feeling that they might fly off into the harbour. It was constructed at Luna Park in 1962 to a design purchased by Ted Hopkins at the Seattle World Trade Fair and was dismantled annually to go to the Sydney and Brisbane shows. Between 1970 and 1979 it was replaced by the Wild Cat but was returned when the park reopened in 1995. (Luna Park Sydney 2009)

Cliff Face:
The sandstone formation along the eastern side of Luna Park has been shaped since the European settlement as it has been cut back for various purposes in previous years including: 1890s excavation for the North Shore Railway and the erection of Dorman Long workshops in the 1920s. Oral history stated that the tunnel and chamber in the cliff face (at the base) were constructed by Luna Park staff during World War Two as an air raid shelter, and that staff and local residents sheltered there during the wartime Japanese midget submarine attack on shipping in Sydney Harbour. However the capacity of this
space was very limited. (Godden Mackay Logan 1999: 81) (SHFA Database Number 4500504).

Fig Trees:
On top of the cliff behind Luna Park are a number of trees dating from the end of the nineteenth century when the cliff top site was occupied by Northcliff house. Since their planting, they have displayed healthy growth. Tree heights and spreads are as follows:
1) Fig tree 10m high 20m diameter;
2) Fig Tree 20m high 25 diameter;
3) Fig tree 9m high 8m diameter;
4) Fig tree 10m high 15m diameter (AHC Database and Luna Park Sydney, 2009)
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
Entrance Face and Towers have been rebuilt as a replica. Coney Island and contents have been restored. The Crystal Palace has been restored with alterations. (AHC Database Number: 017944, File Number 1/13/027/0049)

Archaeological monitoring of Luna Park site was undertaken in c.1993 during redevelopment (Edward Higginbotham 1993). Conservation works undertaken in 1997 to remove in 1993-1994 (Godden Mackay 1992,1999) (SHFA Database Number: 4500504)
Date condition updated:17 Aug 09
Modifications and dates: A number of rides and attractions have been introduced and removed at Luna Park over the past sixty-five years.
Current use: Amusement Park
Former use: Transport Interchange

History

Historical notes: Prior to European settlement of Australia and well into the 19th century, the site of Luna Park was occupied by the Cammeraigal (also spelt as Cammeraygal) Clan, part of the larger Kuringgai Tribe (North Sydney Council Heritage Leaflet 1, 2001, DUAP/DLWC 1998, Appendix 1:1).

In 1805 Robert Campbell purchased a parcel of land on the waterfront of the North Shore, between Lavender Bay and Careening Bay extending about 600 yards inland, which comprised Milsons Point and the future site of Luna Park. 'It was a block of 120 acres which had been originally granted to Robert Ryan a private solder who arrived in the First Fleet and had passed via Charles Grimes the surveyor-general to its new owner'. James Milson Settled on there in 1806 'where by the grace of Robert Campbell, he grazed his herd and built his house'.

From 1822 onwards Milson signed a lease for this land paying 8 pounds per year but later disputed Campbell's claim to it. Although another 12-year lease was signed in 1830 Campbell eventually sued Milson for trespass. No part of this grant passed into the hands of Milson 'until well after the death of Campbell' (in 1846) (Newman 1961: 39, 154-155). In 1830 Jamaican ex-convict Billy Blue commenced the first ferry service across Sydney Harbour. Seven years later a regular wharf and waterman's service was operating from the site. In 1842, Milsons Point was declared a public landing place and by 1860 a regular vehicular ferry service was operating between Milsons Point and Fort Macquarie. In 1886 a tram service commenced between the newly constructed terminus at Milsons Point and North Sydney.

In 1890 the North Shore Railway Line was opened between Hornsby and St. Leonards. Three years later the site was quarried to prepare for the construction of the North Shore Railway Line extension from St Leonards to Milsons Point which followed the shoreline of Lavender Bay. A train station was located at the tip of Milsons Point adjacent to the existing wharf and tram terminus which became the major transport hub of the north In 1915 in preparation for building a bridge across the harbour a new temporary station and ferry wharf was completed further back on the line in Lavender Bay. (DUAP/DLWC 1998, Appendix 1:3-4). From the mid 1800's the area on top of the cliff above the site was developed for housing. Directly above the site was Northcliff House which was demolished in the 1920's however the fig trees in the park on the cliff top are believed to be remnants of this period. (Otto Cserhalmi & Partners 2006).

In 1916 a plan for the bridge across Sydney Harbour was accepted by the Parliamentary Works Committee. The tender for the Construction of the new bridge was awarded to English engineering firm Dorman Long and Company in 1924. Work began on the Bridge the following year. Dorman Long built a number of workshops on the Luna Park site for the fabrication and assembly of steel components used in construction of the bridge, as per the conditions of their contract. Milsons Point Railway Station was relocated in 1924 to the site of the station constructed in 1915. The Sydney Harbour Bridge was officially opened in 1932 which meant that Lavender Bay/Milson Point station and the use of vehicular ferries were made redundant.

The first 'Luna Park' was opened at Coney Island in New York in 1903. The first Luna Park in Australia opened in St Kilda Melbourne in 1912, followed by another at Glenelg (South Australia) in 1930 to a design by Rupert Browne. Luna Park, Glenelg was owned by the Phillips brothers: Herman, Leon and Harold and managed by David Atkins. When the South Australian venture faced difficulties in 1934 the Philips looked for a suitable place in Sydney. At the same time tenders were sought to use the former Dorman Long site for public amusements. Herman Phillips, who formed Luna Park (NSW) Ltd (with his brothers and A. A. Abrahams), won the tender. The lease was for 20 years and started on 11 September 1935 for a 20 year period at an annual rent of 1,500 pounds. Luna Park was constructed over a three-month period in 1935 by Stuart Brothers under the direction of David Atkins and Ted Hopkins using a workforce of over 1,000 labourers. Luna Park was officially opened to the public on 4 October 1935. Long queues waited in front of the park's notable entry's giant face, designed by Rupert Browne. Most wanted to rush in and be first on the Big Dipper, the park's rickety roller coaster ride (Lacey, 2010). The North Sydney Olympic Pool was opened the following year on an adjacent site.

The heyday for Luna Park was between 1935 and 1970. During this period the Park underwent a series of alterations including the introduction of new rides and amusements. The original entrance and famous face were remodelled in 1938-9, 1946-7, 1960, 1973, 1982 and 1995. In 1950 the Phillips brothers, now in their 60s, were bought out by David Atkins, Ted Hopkins and the others. Hopkins (known as 'Hoppy') became the manager of Luna Park in 1957 after the death of Atkins. When Hopkins retired in 1969 the leasehold was taken over by World Trade Centre Pty Ltd. Under the new management, winter closures were abandoned. As Luna Park was opened all year around there was no opportunity to carry out regular maintenance works on the rides.

A version of the Rotor, the spinning machine inveted by Professor Hoffmeister, which had been a big hit at the Festival of Britain in 1951, was erected in Luna Park. This worked by centrifugal force and remains in operation today. A man named Thompson came up with the idea for a ride named 'A Trip to the Moon' at Coney Island, New York, in 1902 and this became the centrepiece of the world's first Luna Park (Lacey, 2010).

In 1973 Martin Sharp and Peter Kingston undertook repainting works on the Park in the Pop Art Style which included a new expression on the entrance face (Marshall 1995: 106). By 1975, Luna Park was operating on a week-to-week lease with plans to develop the Lavender Bay foreshores as a 'Tivoli Gardens'.

In 1977 an exhibition was held at the Art Gallery of NSW called "Fairground Arts and Novelties" highlighting the important aspects of Luna Park. Artists Martin Sharp, Peter Kingston, Richard Liney and Gary Shead did major colour schemes and art works through out the park. "It took us a while to realise that Luna Park was an artwork in itself, a city state of illusion, a brilliant feat of engineering with imagination, created and maintained by men. Sydney must acknowledge the importance of Luna Park. To lose it now would be a tragedy." (Martin Sharp quoted in " Luna Park - Just for fun" by Sam Marshall) .

In 1979 an accident on the Big Dipper injured 13 people. Later that year, a fire in the Ghost Train ride killed six children and one adult. Luna Park was closed from that night.

Throughout 1980 Luna Park remained closed and the Friends of Luna Park was formed to save Luna Park from any potential development. The Big Dipper roller coaster suffered a demise in June 1981. Along with much of the original park, it was demolished by then owner, Col Goldstein. In the month before demolition, anything detachable was auctioned off; the River Caves, for example, sold for 20 pounds, purchased by the Friends of Luna Park. Rides long gone included the Tubmel Bug, the Turkey Trot, the Barrels of Fun and the River Caves. Davey Jones' Locker is now but a painted facade (Lacey, 2010). In 1981 the Luna Park Site Bill was passed which meant Luna Park Holdings had to vacate the site. Luna Park memorabilia and rides, dating from 1935 to 1981, were auctioned off (Marshall 1995: 112-120). The friends of Luna Park prepared a Conservation Plan in 1981.

Luna Park was re-opened in 1982 under the management of Harbourside Amusement Pty Ltd (Daily Telegraph Mirror 25 April 1982). In 1988 Luna Park was closed again and the front entrance towers were demolished, while the entrance face which was a fibreglass caste of the 1973 Martin Sharp face was re-located to storage owned by the Powerhouse Museum.

In 1990 the New South Wales government passed the Luna Park Site Act and appointed the Luna Park Reserve Trust who prepared a Plan of Management in 1991. In 1992 the Trust commissioned Godden Mackay heritage consultants to prepare a Conservation Plan for the site. The Luna Park Reserve Trust between 1993 and 1995 in accordance with this Conservation Plan undertook conservation and construction works. The site was re-opened in January 1995. However following a successful Supreme Court Appeal which effectively prevented the ongoing operation of the Big Dipper the park was closed again in 1996.

In 1997 the Department of Land & Water Conservation (DLWC) engaged the Urban Design Advisory Service (UDAS) to investigate urban design and land use options for the future use of Luna Park (DPWS/DLWC 1998: 1). The Luna Park Plan of Management was prepared by the New South Wales government in 1998 to guide the future management of the Luna Park Reserve. The Luna Park Plan of Management identified a preferred option for Luna Park's future use, determined in consultation with residents, the general public and other stakeholders. The preferred option identified by the Luna Park Plan of Management sought to preserve Luna Park's amusement park character while introducing new uses to improve its viability and accordance with the parameters in the Luna Park Site Amendment Act 1997 (HASSELL 1999: 1-2). Subsequent to adoption of the Luna Park Plan of Management in 1998 the New South Wales Department of Public Works and Services called for proposals to redevelop Luna Park. The proposal prepared by Metro Edgley was ultimately successful. A Master Plan for the site was prepared in 1999 which included a Heritage Report prepared by Godden Mackay Logan. In January 2002 the Minister for Planning approved a development application for the site. (Historical information sourced from SHFA Database; Luna Park Conservation Plan Godden Mackay 1992 and Letter from Luna Park Sydney 2009).

A Master Plan for the site was prepared in 1999. In July 2001 the Big Dipper rollercoaster (installed in 1995) was sold to Dreamworld in Quensland. Recent work has included a new 2,000 seat big top, onsite car park, restaurant, refurbished Crystal Palace function centre and refurbishment of the rides. (Letter from Luna Park Sydney, Oct 2009).

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Public tramline system-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building and maintaining jetties, wharves and docks-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Transport-Activities associated with the moving of people and goods from one place to another, and systems for the provision of such movements Building and maintaining the public railway system-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Towns, suburbs and villages-Activities associated with creating, planning and managing urban functions, landscapes and lifestyles in towns, suburbs and villages Role of transport in settlement-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Building Bridges-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Utilities-Activities associated with the provision of services, especially on a communal basis Public Transport - suburban railway lines-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Technological innovation and design solutions-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Creating works of art-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Adaptation of overseas design for local use-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Creating an icon-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Gathering at landmark places to socialise-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Leisure-Activities associated with recreation and relaxation Enjoying Fairgrounds-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The site now known as Luna Park Precinct is historically significant as the site of the first regular ferry transport between Sydney and the North Shore, and later the busiest ferry wharf on the Harbour, with the exception of Circular Quay. The Milsons Point site was a major transport interchange during the later part of the 19th Century connecting ferry, train and trams. The site later became crucial to the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Fabrication and assembly of steel components for the bridge was done on site at the 1925 Dorman Long and Company workshops.
The Luna Park amusement park constructed on the site in 1935 after the removal of the workshops has been a centre for recreation for generations of Sydney residents and visitors. It became the focus of considerable public action when it was threatened with closure and redevelopment.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
Luna Park has strong association with former park artists, Rupert Browne, Peter Kingston, Gary Shead, Sam Lipson, Arthur Barton, Richard Liney and Martin Sharp. Martin Sharp is an important Sydney artist with an international reputation who was influential in the Australian Pop Art movement in the 1960's and 70's. Examples of the work of these artists survive as moveable items associated with the park and are stored at other locations such as the Powerhouse Museum. (Source: Godden Mackay Luna Park Conservation Plan 1992) .
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Luna Park Precinct has important aesthetic values in its own right, a celebration of colour and fantasy originally in the art deco style, and as a landmark on Sydney Harbour. Luna Park occupies an important and prominent location on the northern foreshore of Sydney Harbour and is highly visible from Circular Quay and the Opera House and other key harbour vantage points. Luna Park is one of Sydney's most recognisable and popular icons, the Luna Park face in particular is an instantly recognisable symbol of Sydney. The prominence of Luna Park is enhanced by the high quarried cliff face and the fig trees which provide a landscaped backdrop together with the way it is framed by the Harbour Bridge when viewed from the east. (Godden Mackay Logan CMP 1992)
Luna Park includes a rare collection of murals and amusements that demonstrate mid 20th century popular art and traditional technologies. These have been complemented by the art works of Martin Sharp, Richard Liney, Gary Shead and Peter Kingston.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
Luna Park is important as a place of significance to generations of the Australian Public, in particular Sydney siders who have strong memories and associations with the place. Its landmark location at the centre of Sydney Harbour together with its recognisable character has endowed it with a far wider sense of ownership, granting it an iconic status.
Luna Park received considerable attention following the tragic Ghost Train fire of 1979 and the ensuing short term closure of the park. It became the focus of considerable public action when it was threatened with redevelopment and remains a subject of high public interest. "It has become symbolic of political and community concern for issues such as the treatment of harbour foreshore, opposition to high-rise development and retention in public ownership of the public estate." (Godden Mackay 1992)
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
Luna Park Precinct is a resource that is likely to yield information through archaeological investigation. Physical and visual evidence survives from most of the major phases of use and activities undertaken within the area.
Luna Park has potential to contain archaeological resources associated with all historical phases of the site's development, including pre-European occupation, development of transport systems in this area, the Dorman Long and Co phase of activity and development and the establishment and development of Luna Park itself. In the unlikely event that intact deposits of Aboriginal relics are present, these would have considerable research potential.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
Luna Park is unique as a rare surviving example of an amusement park and fantasy architecture in the art deco idiom of the 1930s. The original murals and design of Luna Park demonstrate an amusement park aesthetic that was inherited from America and reinterpreted in an Australian context.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
Does not meet this criteria.
Integrity/Intactness: The Luna Park amusement centre has evolved and been altered over time and much of the original fabric of the structures and rides have been replaced with similar or identical components. Despite the replacement of fabric the significance of the place has been maintained through careful reconstruction and commitment to the original design aesthetic.
"The primary significance of the place therefore vests in the concept, design and associative values of place, rather than in any particular fabric. Retaining the integrity of the place therefore requires attention to matters such as design, concept and memories rather than keeping existing fabric and physical evidence." Richard Mackay quoted in Letter from Luna Park Sydney Pty Ltd 2009
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Recommended management:

Review the CMP and link to Plan of Management.

Recommendations

Management CategoryDescriptionDate Updated
Statutory InstrumentNominate for State Heritage Register (SHR)02 Nov 16
Statutory InstrumentNominate for State Heritage Register (SHR)02 Nov 16
Statutory InstrumentNominate for State Heritage Register (SHR)02 Nov 16

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for endorsementDecember 2015 CMP submitted for endorsement  
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
Sep 5 2008
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions Any action specifically identified as an exemption in a Conservation Management Plan prepared for Luna Park, which has been endorsed by the Heritage Council of NSW;
Any action required to meet the obligations arising under the NSW Occupational Health and Safety Act 2000;
Replacement or removal of any amusement or ride (excluding the Wild Mouse, the Rotor, Coney Island and its contents, the Crystal Palace and the Entrance Face and Towers);
Installation of new amusements or rides in accordance with existing Development Consents as defined in Exemption number 9 of these Site Specific Exemptions;
Erection of signs relating to the operation of Luna Park in accordance with the existing Development Consents (including the approved signage strategy) listed in Exemption number 9 of these Site Specific Exemptions;
Removal of any post 1995 buildings or structures;
Repair, upgrading or replacement of post-1995 murals or artworks;
Erection of temporary structures related to the operations of Luna Park in accordance with existing Development Consents listed in Exemption number 9 of these Site Specific Exemptions;
Any development for which a valid development consent was issued prior to 31 August 2009 (North Sydney Council:DA427/00; MOD A3089/00) ( Department of Planning: DA154-06-01; DA151-5-2002; MOD32-05-2002; MOD491-10-03; DA201-6-2002; MOD47-6-2002; DA264-8-2002; DA60-2-2003; MP06_0163) (Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority DA491-10-03; MOD151-05-02; DA039-01-04; MOD154-06-1(1); DA75-02-04; MOD201-06-02(1); DA86-03-04; DA98-03-04; MOD201-06-02(2); MOD154-06-01(2); DA169-06-05; MOD154-06-01(3); DA131-08-06; DA109-08-07; DA056-05-07; MOD056-05-07(1); DA109-06-08; DA118-07-08; DA144-09-08.
Any action required by or obligations arising from the Luna Park Site Act 1990; and
Any action required by or obligations arising from any Luna Park Plan of Management that is prepared in accordance with the Luna Park Site Act 1990.
Mar 5 2010

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage Register 0181105 Mar 10 361152
Local Environmental PlanNorth Sydney LEP    
National Trust of Australia register      
Register of the National Estate     

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
North Sydney Heritage Study Review1993 Brassil, T., Irving, R., Pratten, C., Conybeare Morrison  No

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
WrittenAustralian Heritage Database1997Luna Park Precinct, Milsons Point , NSW
WrittenElizabeth Farrelly2003Get back on the rollercoaster (SMH 19/8/03)
WrittenGodden Mackay Logan1999Heritage Report: Luna Park – Metro Edgley Project (for Master Plan)
WrittenGodden Mackay Pty Ltd Heritage Consultantants1992Luna Park Conservation Plan
WrittenHASSELL1999Luna Park: Master Plan
WrittenLacey, Stephen2010Roller-Coaster ride into past' in Destination Sydney, in 'Traveller' section
WrittenLuna Park Sydney Pty Ltd2009Letter regarding proposed SHR Listing
WrittenOtto Cserhalmi and Partners PL2006Statement of Heritage Impact Luna Park Cliff Top Site C
WrittenProtectors of Sydney Foreshore Inc2004State Heritage Inventory nomination forms
WrittenSHFA Heritage Register2004Luna Park - 6 Elements

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5055827
File number: S91/06194/025


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