The Grange and Macquarie Plains Cemetery | NSW Environment & Heritage

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The Grange and Macquarie Plains Cemetery

Item details

Name of item: The Grange and Macquarie Plains Cemetery
Other name/s: Macquarie Plains Cemetery
Type of item: Complex / Group
Group/Collection: Farming and Grazing
Category: Homestead Complex
Location: Lat: -33.49622240 Long: 149.67940497
Primary address: 3249 O'Connell Road, Bathurst, NSW 2795
Parish: Melrose
County: Roxburgh
Local govt. area: Bathurst Regional
Local Aboriginal Land Council: Bathurst
Hectares (approx): 42
Property description
Lot/Volume CodeLot/Volume NumberSection NumberPlan/Folio CodePlan/Folio Number
LOT1 DP779403
All addresses
Street AddressSuburb/townLGAParishCountyType
3249 O'Connell RoadBathurstBathurst RegionalMelroseRoxburghPrimary Address

Owner/s

Organisation NameOwner CategoryDate Ownership Updated
 Private 

Statement of significance:

The Grange is of state significance for its history and rarity as one of the earliest surviving colonial farmhouses built in inland Australia. Forming one of the pioneering families of the Bathurst region, John West and his brother Thomas came to the area in 1821 to farm on adjoining lands granted to them by Governor Macquarie. John West's farmhouse dating from 1830 has aesthetic significance for its wrap-around verandah, which has been claimed to be the earliest surviving example of its kind in Australia, and for its well-proportioned and symmetrical Georgian facade. The Grange also has significance for its potential to provide insights into early colonial life and conditions for convicts, some of whom were known to have been assigned to the farm. The historic Methodist cemetery (used c.1855-1896), on quarter hectare of the original grant, is an important relic from the time of the early settler families in the area, and includes the graves of members of the West family.
Date significance updated: 13 Mar 13
Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Vernacular
Builder/Maker: Vernacular - probably convict labour
Construction years: 1830-1836
Physical description: The Grange is located 12km southeast of Bathurst within the Macquarie Valley in the Central Tablelands district. The 28 hectares included in this listing is that part of Lot 6 DP 880125 located between O'Connell Road and the Fish River as well as the adjacent quarter hectare lot with cemetery dating from the mid-nineteenth century. Both are a remnant of the original grant of 600 acres (243 hectares) made to John West by Lachlan Macquarie c.1821.

Grounds and gardens:
The gardens around the homestead do not appear to be original and may not be heritage significant. They have been largely planted by the current owners since purchasing the property in 1972. It is believed the gum tree at the entrance gate to the property on O'Connell Road is more historic and is considered significant. There is also an historic poplar tree located on the western side of the kitchen wing. No heritage survey of the vegetation on the property had been conducted by the time of the SHR listing in 2012.

The remainder of the original grant land surrounding the homestead to be included in the SHR listing has been used traditionally for pasturing sheep and includes vernacular structures such as corrugated iron and timber sheds, fencing and sheep yards. There is a non-significant green house on the east side of the homestead. No heritage survey of these ancilliary structures on the property had been conducted by the time of the SHR listing in 2012.

Cemetery:
The cemetery is located on a 2/3 acre parcel of land donated by John West to the Methodist Church in 1844 and retains its separate Land Parcel number (Lot 1, DP779403). It is located 500m to the south of The Grange farmhouse and sits in the north eastern corner of the section of land south of O'Connell Road. It is bordered to the south and east by the Grange, by O'Connell Road to the north, and the neighbouring property (DP 10909350) to the west. A small wooden Methodist church was apparently demolished c.1920 and only the ruins of the graveyard remain. The graves are those of local Macquarie Plains families, including some members of the West family,apparently dating from between 1837 and 1896. 22 inscriptions were recorded for the Australian Cemeteries Index in 2006 and are available for viewing online. This website quotes a local community member stating that the cemetery was a children's cemetery during the 1876 scarlet fever epidemic, and that many children are buried here in unmarked graves.

Homestead:
The homestead includes a Georgian farmhouse understood to date from c.1830, a kitchen-garage wing on the north eastern side, probably dating from the same time and a cottage wing on the north western side dating from c.1836. Both wings are now joined to the original house to form a courtyard entrance area facing O'Connell Road.

The original farmhouse has a verandah which originally surrounded the house entirely and is believed to be one of earliest examples of a wrap-around verandah built in Australia (CMP 2007). The verandah has been enclosed on two northern corners to form rooms that now connect the farmhouse to the cottage and the kitchen-garage wing. An 'outdoor' room has also been added c.1980 near the southwest corner of the farmhouse. The verandah has a separated roof with a lower pitch than the main roof, a solution favoured aesthectially from the mid-1830s (Broadbent 1997, p.314). The walls of the farmhouse are rendered brickwork. A partition wall within the kitchen wing is constructed of pise. The original windows on the farmhouse are timber-framed, double-hung with six lights per pane, fine glazing bars and mostly original glass. The original entrance (facing south towards the river) has a formal symmetrical facade with a central door and half round fan-light with 8 panels. The original shingles for the roof, manufactured locally, are believed to be still in place beneath the corrugated iron roof. The most intact part of the original farmhouse is its hallway.

John West had several male convicts listed under his household during the period the three sections of the homestead were constructed, so it is believed to be convict built.

The homestead was originally designed with the front entrance facing the original road to the south. The construction of a new road to the north c.1860 (O'Connell Road) necessitated a changed orientation for the house to the north, utilising what was originally the rear facade and courtyard, which now acts as the entrance to the homestead.

Outbuilding: Kitchen:
The kitchen, originally built as a separate outhouse and probably dating from the same time as the original farmhouse. The cottage dating from c.1836 was built using hand-produced bricks (CMP, 2007).
Physical condition and/or
Archaeological potential:
The Grange farmhouse (c.1830) remains largely on its original footprint and retains a considerable proportion of its original construction although with extensive minor changes to the configuration of internal rooms, and rooms added to three of the four corners of the wrap around verandah. There is rising damp in bedrooms on the north east side.

The cottage (c.1836) retains its external walls but has been extended one room's width to the east to incorporate a new kitchen and bathroom. What was previously a tack room (used to house equipment for horses when bought by the current owners in 1972) has been turned into a sitting room but the bedrooms on the south west end of the cottage remain in their original configuration.

The cemetery is in derelict and unrenovated condition. The Australian Cemeteries Index describes it: "Several of the stones have been repaired or re-erected after falling or being knocked over at some stage. Two of the sandstone monuments have been eroded by rising salt near ground level rendering the lower text unreadable but others are in surprisingly good condition for their age." 22 inscriptions transcribed by the index in 2006 and updated in 2012 are available online. Records concerning the cemetery are apparently also available from the National Trust and Bathurst Council.
Date condition updated:29 Aug 12
Modifications and dates: The Grange has been altered over time by its various occupants. The construction of the new O'Connell Road c.1860 (which bisected the original land grant property) brought about a change in entry from the southwestern facade, facing the river to the northeastern facade facing O'Connell Road.

In c.1880 the wall dividing the sitting and dining rooms was demolished to form one larger living room. The fireplace was relocated to the western wall of the room, using the original cedar mantle (Edwards CMP).

The fireplace in the main bedroom is believed to have been added or renovated in 1880 at the same time as the living room fireplace, using the same bricks. The ceiling in this room is thought to have been replaced c.1920. The ceiling in the second bedroom is also thought to have been replaced at this time.

A bathroom was created in the lobby and part of the verandah, c.1920s.

The once separate kitchen wing was joined to the main house prior to 1900. A fibro panelled ceiling in the kitchen was installed c.1920.

In 1965 the wood room was repaired for wood storage. In 1975 a door was attached to the wood room for security.

The timber floor of the kitchen was replaced with cement in 1965.

In 1972 the original sulky shed collapsed (now the garage area consisting of two open garages and a tool room with the kitchen roofline extended for symmetry).

In 1975 access was made to the small outside verandah bedroom.

In 1975 the corners of the rear verandah were enclosed to form a dressing room and bathroom. The kitchen was renovated in 1975, removing the wood fired stove. The doors from the kitchen out to the kitchen garden were replaced in 1975. In 1975 a door was added from the dining room through to the wood room.

In 1980 an outdoor room was added near the south western corner of the house.

The original ceiling in the dining room (small corner room) was replaced in 1985. The original horsehair and plaster ceiling of the small bedroom collapsed and was replaced in 1985.

In 1998 the lobby/bathroom window was replaced with French doors.

The cottage earlier consisted of two bedrooms joined by a doorway with two entries to the courtyard. The cottage was partially rebuilt in 1973 and one doorway to the courtyard removed. The smaller of the two rooms, then a tack room, became a living area with a concrete floor to replace the dirt floor. The larger room had a fireplace and two windows and was partitioned off to form two bedrooms. A new brick extension was added to the western side of the cottage, comprising of a kitchen/dining, a lobby and a bathroom. The bricks used for the new extension were sourced from the demolition of the National Bank in Bathurst.
Current use: Private home and adjoining agricultural property and cemetery ruin.
Former use: Private home and farm (horse breeding, wheat, livestock), cemetery

History

Historical notes: Aboriginal land
Aboriginal occupation of the Blue Mountains area dates back at least 12,000 years and appears to have intensified some 3000-4000 years ago. In pre-colonial times the area now known as Bathurst was inhabited by Aboriginal people of the Wiradjuri group. The clan associated with Bathurst occupied on a seasonal basis most of the Macquarie River area. They moved regularly in small groups but preferred the open land and used the waterways for a variety of food. There are numerous river flats where debris from recurrent camps accumulated over a long period. Colonisation in this region after the first documented European expedition west of the Blue Mountains in 1813 was tentative because of resistance from Aboriginal people. There was some contact, witnessed by sporadic hostility and by the quantity of surviving artefacts manufactured by the Aborigines from European glass. By 1840 there was widespread dislocation of Aboriginal culture, aggravated after 1850 by the gold rush to the region (HO & DUAP, 1996, 88).

Colonisation
European exploration of the Bathurst area is an extension of the exploration of the eastern inland following closely upon the crossing of the Blue Mountains in 1813. Assistant Surveyor George Evans undertook an initial reconnaissance as far as the Bathurst Plains also in 1813. Bathurst then served as the commencement point for many later official expeditions, as well as for many unofficial reconnaissances by settlers and soldiers. (McLachlan 2007, p.40)

In 1814-1815, the first road across the Blue Mountains and on to Bathurst was constructed by William Cox and convict labourers. Known as Cox's Road, it reached O'Connell Plains, much of it along the same route as present-day Carlwood Road. Keeping to the south of the Fish River, it passed by the current location of the Grange about a kilometre to its south.

Within a decade or so of its construction, Cox's Road was rivalled as the preferred route from the mountains by other roads, including unofficial deviations which offered either easier or shorter routes. Locally, these changes were mainly to do with crossing the river to the east of Bathurst and approaching the settled area over more easily travelled country. The new routes also reflected new land grants in and around Kelso. A new official route was surveyed in 1823 which crossed the Fish River at O'Connell and, following the line of a similar route to the present day Bathurst-O'Connell Road, entered Bathurst via Kelso, thus requiring a crossing of the Macquarie River at the Bathurst settlement. The current Bathurst-O'Connell Road has bisected the Grange property since 1860. (McLachlan 2007, p.83)

With the extension of British colonial rule beyond the Blue Mountains in 1815, the system of land tenure established in Sydney was extended into the Bathurst region. This system did not recognise prior Aboriginal ownership of the land but understood all land to be owned by the Crown, to be provided to settlers through land grants. Governor Macquarie, who favoured a limited settlement of the newly discovered country west of the Blue Mountains, strictly controlled the alienation of Crown Land in the Bathurst area during his governorship between 1810 and 1821. Land grants were made during Macquarie's administration to only a handful of pastoralists. This included generous land grants to those associated with the opening of the way to the interior and the building of the roads to Bathurst, notably William Cox and William Lawson. Much smaller land grants were also made in 1818 to ten less prominent settlers, a mix of free and emancipist men, for farms in the Kelso area.

Soon after this in 1821, land grants on adjacent lots were also made to free settler brothers, Thomas and John West. Each was granted 600 acres of land, and John West established The Grange, while Thomas West established Westham to the east. Both West brothers built similar styled Georgian farm houses, and both farmhouses are still extant, although the Grange is possibly more intact than Westham.

In 1822 Governor Brisbane introduced a more expansionary policy of land grants. Free settlers were encouraged to apply for land grants and allowed to nominate specific blocks of land. Brisbane's encouragement of pastoral settlement, with the consequent in-rush of grant holders and their stock, quickly overran huge tracks of Wiradjuri land. In 1824 the Wiradjuri attempted an armed resistance to this threat which was ruthlessly put down by the troops in Bathurst.

The success of some of the early pastoralists led to the building of quite substantial homesteads soon after their arrival. The remaining fabric of these homesteads often display the evolution of the pastoralists' success - with rooms and wings added to the basic, original building and open areas enclosed. A number of these early homesteads such as The Grange and Westham still exist, usually single storey and sometimes Georgian in style but adapted for the colonial climate. Their style, size and substance reflected the growing wealth and status of the owners, men who had been able to gain the best land on the plains. The Grange is a particularly good surviving example of a Georgian homestead, as it is largely unaltered from its original construction. These early homesteads provided accommodation not only for the pastoralist and his family but also for servants and workers, including assigned convicts prior to the 1840s. Outbuildings used today for other purposes may have once provided accommodations for servants and farm workers. (McLachlan 2007, p.96)

Around 1844 John West donated two-thirds of an acre (quarter of a hectare) of land to the Methodist Church to build a small church and cemetery. The cemetery appears to have been first used in 1837 and discontinued in 1896. It contains at least 22 graves. The timber church was demolished in 1920. The land with cemetery was purchased back from the Uniting Church in 1997 by the current owners of the Grange.

The Grange was used for pastoral farming by four generations of the West family until it was sold to Edward Rooke in 1955. In 1965 the Grange was sold to Dr Brooke Moore and Mrs Freeda Moore, and then in 1972 was sold to Mrs Moore's niece and her husband, the current owners in 2012, Edward and Lorraine Jones. The buildings were in poor condition in the 1970s and have been gradually conserved since then by the current owners.

Timeline of the Property:
1815 - Cox's Road built just south of the Fish River through the Macquarie Plains, the first British built road leading from the Blue Mountains to Bathurst
1821 - John West and his brother Thomas are each granted 600 acres in adjoining land on the Fish River (The Grange and Westham) - two of the rare early land grants made in the Bathurst region by Lachlan Macquarie
1823 - New route for road between O'Connell and Bathurst, runs near the current location of The Grange
c1830 - Original farmhouse constructed by John West (most likely using convict labour assigned to him) of brick walls, timber shingles roof and surrounding verandah. It is believed to have been named The Grange at this time by John West. (CMP). A similar shaped farmhouse is built around the same time by his brother Thomas West on his adjoining land grant, named Westham.
1836 - The brick cottage is built adjacent to The Grange farmhouse
1837 - First known burial in cemetery - Eliza Hall
1844 - John West donates two-thirds of an acre on the eastern boundary to the Methodist Church to build a church and for use as a cemetery (CMP). A small timber church is built and remains in use until c.1920 (CMP).
1860 - New road to O'Connell is built, bisecting The Grange property
1920 - Original 600 acre land grant divided into three 250 acre lots. Lot containing The Grange farmhouse is retained by the West family, remaining two lots are sold and become known as Illawong and Westbrook (now known as Ashbrook)
1997 - Land from cemetery and church donated by John West to Methodist Church is purchased back as part of The Grange by Edward Jones from the Uniting Church (CMP)

Timeline of the Grange Residents:
1819 - John West is given permission in England to proceed to the colony as a free settler with his family (NSW State Records (NSWSR) Reel 6021; 4/1094 pp.93-96). His brother Thomas also given permission to proceed with his wife Elizabeth and six children: Joseph 20, Francis Jane 17, Eliza 14, Ann 12, Sarah 7 and Catherine 4. James was born in 1822 in the colony (West, 2013)
1821 - John West with his wife Martha and children arrives in Sydney on the Westmorland: Joseph 24, William 22, John 20, James 17, Major 13 (West, 2013).
1821 - John West, Parramatta listed as free settler to receive 600 acre land grant in Bathurst (NSWSR 3266; 9/2652 pp.67, 71)
1825 - John West and family live in town of Bathurst prior to The Grange being built
1849 - John West dies, Bathurst (Aust Death Index V1849338 105)
1930 - Charles James West (grandson of John West, son of Major West) living at The Grange with his wife and three children
1935 - Charles James West dies, Bathurst
1936 - Leslie Charles West and Arthur Thompson West (grandsons of John West, sons of Charles James West) living at The Grange with their sister Amy Ellen.
1945 - Edward Rooke appointed share farmer on The Grange property.
1955 - Arthur Thompson West dies, Bathurst.
1955 - Edward Rooke purchases The Grange from estate of Arthur Thompson West.
1965 - Mrs Freeda Moore, wife of Dr Brooke Moore, purchases The Grange from Mr Rooke.
1972 - Edward and Lorraine Jones (niece of Mrs Freeda Moore) purchase The Grange from estate of Mrs Freeda Moore


Comparative examples of the earliest surviving colonial residences in Lithgow and Bathurst region just west of the Blue Mountains:

Blackdown homestead (Bathurst LGA)
90 Eleven Mile Drive Eglinton (1820s)
On Thomas Hawkins land granted 1822
Said to be the first privately built brick building west of the Blue Mountains (RNE)
Bathurst LEP, Bathurst Council Heritage Study, Register of the National Estate, National Trust Register

Kelloshiel (Bathurst LGA)
Eglinton (1820s)
On George Ranken land grant of 1822
National Trust Register

Collit's Inn (Lithgow LGA)
Hartley Vale Road, Hartley Vale (c.1823)
State Heritage Register, Lithgow LEP

Moyne (Lithgow LGA)
Coxs River Road, Kanimbla (c.1820s)
Said to be older than Collit's Inn, convict built, includes private cemetery
Lithgow LEP, Lithgow Council Heritage Study

Bathurst town house (Bathurst LGA)
67 Morisset St Bathurst (attributed 1824)
Simple Georgian character with front verandah and high pitched roof
Under consideration for LEP listing

Macquarie (homestead) (Bathurst LGA)
O'Connell Road, Bathurst (1820s)
On William Lawson land grant
Simple Georgian character with wrap-around verandah, possible two storey convict barn.
No heritage listings

Lowther Park and cemetery (Lithgow LGA)
Jenolan Caves Road Lowther (c.1825)
Two storey convict built stone house with basement
(The folk-lore of the housekeeper's murder, immortalised by Henry Lawson, adds an extra layer of significance)
Lithgow LEP, Lithgow Council Heritage Study 1997, National Trust Register

Springdale (also known as Violet Hill) (Bathurst LGA)
5350 Great Western Highway, Raglan (1826?)
Small Georgian Colonial
Bathurst LEP, National Trust Register

Westham (Bathurst LGA)
3118 O'Connell Street, Brewongle (c.1830)
On Thomas West land grant
Early settlers homestead
Simple Georgian character
Bathurst Council Heritage Study, National Trust Register

Bunnamagoo (Bathurst LGA)
573 Burraga Road, Rockley (1831)
Rare colonial two storey constructed by James & Thomas Pye
Bathurst Council Heritage Study, National Trust Register

Harp of Erin (Lithgow LGA)
Great Western Highway Little Hartley (c.1832)
Group of vernacular single storey timber and brick buildings, said to be oldest inn and longest operating on the western road opened in 1832
Lithgow LEP, Lithgow Council Heritage Study

Colonial Residence (Bathurst LGA)
4-8 Stephens Lane, Kelso (c.1835)
Two storey Georgian
Bathurst LEP, Bathurst Council Heritage Study

Littlebourne Homestead (Bathurst LGA)
On William Cox land grant
256 Keppel Street (Oberon Road?) Kelso (c.1830s)
Simple single storey colonial
Bathurst LEP, Bathurst Council Heritage Study

Fosters Valley (Bathurst LGA)
1811 Rockley Road Fosters Valley (c1832)
Large single-storey, u-shape - former inn?
Bathurst Council Heritage Study, National Trust Register

Kelsoville (Bathurst LGA)
30 Sydney Road Kelso
Constructed c.1840 by George Cheshire
Bathurst LEP, Register of the National Estate, National Trust Register

Alloway Bank (Bathurst LGA)
135 Eglinton Drive Eglinton (c.1840)
On John Piper land grant
Bathurst LEP, Bathurst Council Heritage Study, National Trust Register

Historic themes

Australian theme (abbrev)New South Wales themeLocal theme
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Aboriginal cultures and interactions with other cultures-Activities associated with maintaining, developing, experiencing and remembering Aboriginal cultural identities and practices, past and present. Wiradjuri Nation - defending the land-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Convict labour-
2. Peopling-Peopling the continent Convict-Activities relating to incarceration, transport, reform, accommodation and working during the convict period in NSW (1788-1850) - does not include activities associated with the conviction of persons in NSW that are unrelated to the imperial 'convict system': use the theme of Law & Order for such activities Working on private assignment-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Agriculture-Activities relating to the cultivation and rearing of plant and animal species, usually for commercial purposes, can include aquaculture Clearing land for farming-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Environment - cultural landscape-Activities associated with the interactions between humans, human societies and the shaping of their physical surroundings Landscapes and countryside of rural charm-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use Agisting and fattening stock for slaughter-
3. Economy-Developing local, regional and national economies Pastoralism-Activities associated with the breeding, raising, processing and distribution of livestock for human use pastoral homestead-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Accommodation-Activities associated with the provision of accommodation, and particular types of accommodation – does not include architectural styles – use the theme of Creative Endeavour for such activities. Housing farming families-
4. Settlement-Building settlements, towns and cities Land tenure-Activities and processes for identifying forms of ownership and occupancy of land and water, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Early land grants-
5. Working-Working Labour-Activities associated with work practises and organised and unorganised labour Working on pastoral stations-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Building in response to climate - verandahs-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Vernacular structures and building techniques-
8. Culture-Developing cultural institutions and ways of life Creative endeavour-Activities associated with the production and performance of literary, artistic, architectural and other imaginative, interpretive or inventive works; and/or associated with the production and expression of cultural phenomena; and/or environments that have inspired such creative activities. Architectural styles and periods - colonial vernacular-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Birth and Death-Activities associated with the initial stages of human life and the bearing of children, and with the final stages of human life and disposal of the dead. Crematoria-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Birth and Death-Activities associated with the initial stages of human life and the bearing of children, and with the final stages of human life and disposal of the dead. Isolated graves / Remnant headstones-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Sandford, principal of Eskbank Iron and Steel Works-Persons
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Governor (later Maj-Gen.) Lachlan Macquarie, 1810-1821-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Edward Rooke, grazier-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with David Wilson, sculptor-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with William Cox, road builder over Blue Mountains, magistrate, farmer-
9. Phases of Life-Marking the phases of life Persons-Activities of, and associations with, identifiable individuals, families and communal groups Associations with Dr Brooke and Mrs Freeda Moore, graziers-

Assessment of significance

SHR Criteria a)
[Historical significance]
The Grange is of state significance as one of the earliest residences to be constructed in inland Australia and an early example of a colonial Georgian house. It was probably built by convict labour around 1830 on land granted to John West in 1821, one of only a few land grants made in the area by Governor Macquarie. John West, a free settler farmer who may have participated in the original surveying of the area, along with his brother Thomas, were early landowners and a founding family of the district. The historic cemetery is a relic from the time of the early days of colonisation in the area, and includes the graves of members of the West family. The Grange is a prominent property in and important historical locale for the development of the region of Bathurst. The listing includes 27 hectares of land from the original 1821 grant.
SHR Criteria b)
[Associative significance]
The Grange is of local significance for its association with the governorship of Lachlan Macquarie, being one of the few land grants made by Macquarie west of the Blue Mountains. It is also of local significance for its geographical association with the building of the early roads to Bathurst, since it was established within a few years and within a few kilometres of Cox's pioneering road to Bathurst. It is also of local significance for its association with the pioneering West family in Bathurst, being originally owned and built by John West and located adjoining property owned by his brother Thomas West.
SHR Criteria c)
[Aesthetic significance]
The Grange is of state significance aesthetically as an exemplar of a colonial farmhouse which demonstrates the symmetrical and well-proportioned characteristics of the Georgian architectural style. Its wrap-around verandah, dating from c.1830, has been described as the first to be built in Australia.
SHR Criteria d)
[Social significance]
The Grange is of local significance to many people in the Bathurst area as an intact demonstration of colonial life in the Bathurst region at the commencement of European settlement in the area.
SHR Criteria e)
[Research potential]
The Grange is of at least local significance as for its potential to yield archaeological information about the colonial and convict history of NSW and the lives and occupations of the people who worked there.
SHR Criteria f)
[Rarity]
The Grange is of state significance for its rarity as a fairly intact example of an early Georgian colonial farmhouse. The cemetery at The Grange is of local significance as a rare surviving example of a community burial site for early settlers and their families.
SHR Criteria g)
[Representativeness]
The Grange is of state significance as a representative example of a colonial Georgian homestead probably built by convict labour on an early colonial land grant.
Assessment criteria: Items are assessed against the PDF State Heritage Register (SHR) Criteria to determine the level of significance. Refer to the Listings below for the level of statutory protection.

Procedures /Exemptions

Section of actDescriptionTitleCommentsAction date
21(1)(b)Conservation Plan submitted for commentSEPP 1 objection for 3 lot subdivision using the incentive provisions contained int eh Draft Bathurst Heritage Study 2007.  
57(2)Exemption to allow workStandard Exemptions SCHEDULE OF STANDARD EXEMPTIONS
HERITAGE ACT 1977
Notice of Order Under Section 57 (2) of the Heritage Act 1977

I, the Minister for Planning, pursuant to subsection 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, do by this Order:

1. revoke the Schedule of Exemptions to subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act made under subsection 57(2) and published in the Government Gazette on 22 February 2008; and

2. grant standard exemptions from subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977, described in the Schedule attached.

FRANK SARTOR
Minister for Planning
Sydney, 11 July 2008

To view the schedule click on the Standard Exemptions for Works Requiring Heritage Council Approval link below.
 
57(2)Exemption to allow workHeritage Act - Site Specific Exemptions HERITAGE ACT 1977

ORDER UNDER SECTION 57(2) TO GRANT SITE SPECIFIC EXEMPTIONS FROM APPROVAL

The Grange and Macquarie Plains Cemetery

SHR No. 1904

I, the Minister for Heritage, on the recommendation of the Heritage Council of New South Wales, in pursuance of section 57(2) of the Heritage Act 1977, do, by this my order, grant an exemption from section 57(1) of that Act in respect of the engaging in or carrying out of any activities described in Schedule C by the owner described in Schedule B on the item described in Schedule A.

The Hon Gabrielle Upton MP
Minister for Heritage
Dated at Sydney, 29th Day of April 2017



SCHEDULE A
The item known as The Grange and Macquarie Plains Cemetery, situated on the land described in Schedule B.

SCHEDULE B
All those pieces or parcels of land known as Lot 1 DP 779403 and part of Lot 6 DP 880125 in Parish of Melrose,
County of Roxborough shown on the plan catalogued HC 2555 in the office of the Heritage Council of New South
Wales.

SCHEDULE C

1. All Standard Exemptions

2. All repair, maintenance and extension works to the existing farm buildings and sheds for the purpose of pastoral/agricultural activities (and that are in accordance with the Bathurst Regional 2014 LEP or replacement where relevant clauses are the same) within the section identified as the Working Area on the curtilage map HC Plan No 2555 at the date of gazettal of this exemption together with this exemption, provided that the works are wholly within the Working Area.

3. Construction of new farm buildings and sheds for the purpose of pastoral/agricultural activities (and that are in accordance with the Bathurst Regional 2014 LEP or replacement where relevant clauses are the same) within the section identified as the Working Area on the curtilage map HC Plan No 2555 at the date of gazettal of this exemption together with this exemption, provided that the works are wholly within the Working Area.

4. Repair and removal of existing fencing and erection of new fencing of a rural nature using traditional rural fencing materials such as pipe, wire, timber, masonry or the like within the section identified as the Working Area activities (and that are in accordance with the Bathurst Regional 2014 LEP or replacement where relevant clauses are the same) on the curtilage map HC Plan No 2555 at the date of gazettal of this exemption, provided that the works are wholly within the Working Area. This exemption applies to fixed fencing as well as temporary fencing and yards for the purpose of animal movement and containment.

5. The removal of elms, acacias and Hawthorns within the section identified as the Working Area on the curtilage map HC Plan No 2555 at the date of gazettal of this exemption, in accordance with the relevant LEP or DCP. This may also apply elsewhere in the curtilage where Bathurst Regional Council and its Heritage Advisor are satisfied that works will not have a negative impact on The Grange and/or any remnant cultural plantings.
May 12 2017

PDF Standard exemptions for works requiring Heritage Council approval

Listings

Heritage ListingListing TitleListing NumberGazette DateGazette NumberGazette Page
Heritage Act - State Heritage RegisterCurtilage amendment0190415 Mar 13 35644 & 645
Local Environmental PlanThe Grange, Brewongle19413 May 11   
National Trust of Australia register The Grange78311 Feb 74   
National Trust of Australia register The Grange cemetery117220 Jul 87   

Study details

TitleYearNumberAuthorInspected byGuidelines used
Bathurst Regional Heritage Study2007 Robin McLachlan  Yes

References, internet links & images

TypeAuthorYearTitleInternet Links
Written 2017NSW Government Gazette - Notice of curtilage reduction View detail
WrittenAustralian Cemetery Index Macquarie Plains Cemetery View detail
WrittenEdward Jones (Owner)2012Conservation Management Plan for The Grange (Draft)
WrittenHeritage Office and Dept of Urban Affairs & Planning1996Regional Histories of NSW
WrittenHickson, Barbara2007Bathurst Regional Heritage Study
WrittenRobin McLachlan2007The New Country: A Thematic History of the Bathurst Regional Council Local Government Area
WrittenRod West (great great great grandson of Thomas West)2013Email to Heritage Branch with family history details and corrections about the West family, 11 June 2013

Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.

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(Click on thumbnail for full size image and image details)

Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:
Name: Heritage Office
Database number: 5060570
File number: 12/08304, EF14/4387


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