Call to Southern Highlands and Tablelands landholders to help save the Glossy Black-Cockatoo

Local landholders and community members from Bullio, Mandemar, Canyonleigh, Paddys River, Wingello, Penrose, Marulan and Bungonia areas are invited to join an information session about the new Glossies in the Mist project, which aims to save the Glossy Black-Cockatoo in The Great Western Wildlife Corridor.

Black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus lathami) in flight, Gwydir Watercourse

The information sessions, hosted by the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH), will feature interesting talks from Glossy Black-Cockatoo experts Matt Cameron (OEH) and Karleah Berris (the Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources) as well as talks from local Southern Highlands project partners about the aims of the project and how local landholders can get involved.

The three information sessions are to be held

  • Friday 27 April: Wingello Mechanics Institute Hall, 3–5pm
  • Saturday 28 April: Canyonleigh Community Hall, 10am–12noon
  • Saturday 28 April: Mandamar RFS shed, 3–5pm

Simon Tedder, Community Engagement Officer at OEH said we are calling on local landholders who reside in the Great Western Wildlife Corridor, which traverses Bullio to Bungonia to be involved in the project.

“We need local community support for this project which aims to save these magnificent birds which have sadly experienced local decline due to habitat loss. Glossies are now listed as vulnerable in NSW and as endangered by the Australian Government,” said Mr Tedder.

“Glossy Black-Cockatoos require corridors of native vegetation with tree hollows for nesting and feeding habitat to move across the broader landscape.

“The Great Western Wildlife Corridor is an important landscape connection for the Glossy Black-Cockatoo and the only vegetated habitat between the Southern Blue Mountains and Morton National Park.

“We are looking for local landholders to learn more about the species and get involved in the program by reporting Glossy Black-Cockatoo sightings, mapping nesting hollows, identifying key feeding trees and planting she-oak trees on their properties, the birds’ most important food source.  

“So, get on board and attend an information session to learn more about the plans to save this species, and receive free locally-sourced she-oak tubestock, to improve foraging habitat for Glossies on your property,” said Mr Tedder.

The program is funded by the NSW Government’s Saving our Species program and Wingecarribee Shire Council’s Environment Levy. The NSW Government is investing $100 million over five years in the Saving our Species program, with the aim of securing as many threatened species as possible in the wild for the next 100 years.

Find out how you can contribute to the Glossies in the Mist project by heading to Glossies in the Mist.