Your favourite NSW threatened species of 2021

It was a tight race to the finish line – but we’re excited to announce the winner of the inaugural Saving our Species threatened NSW species of the year vote!

At Saving our Species (SoS), we want more people in NSW to know and care about our threatened plants and animals, so we recently asked you to choose your favourite.

A pair of Glossy black-cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus lathami) sit on a tree branch at Captain Cook's Lookout in Hat Head National Park.After thousands of votes, your Saving our Species Threatened Species of the Year has been chosen. Introducing, the glossy-black cockatoo!

Your winner: the glossy black-cockatoo

Help us celebrate this incredible bird by:

How the race went down

After a strong start, the mountain pygmy-possum was soon pushed out of the top spot by the 2 contending cockatoos. The gang-gang and glossy black-cockatoos were neck-in-neck throughout the voting period – but the glossy black managed to just stay ahead and ultimately claim the winning spot.

Honourable mention goes to the variable midge orchid which, despite being the only plant to feature in round 2 of the vote, and arguably the least known of the 10 species, placed in the very respectable fifth position.

What’s next?

Thank you for helping to bring some love and attention to our incredible NSW threatened species – your votes and excitement have helped to make this campaign a success.

The winners of our incredible prizes have also been chosen and will be contacted via email – so keep an eye on your inbox.

No matter where each of these species placed in the vote, and even if your favourite didn’t make the top 10, know that Saving our Species is working hard to conserve more than 400 at-risk plants and animals in NSW – including the ones you haven’t heard of.

Find out more about the Saving our Species program and how we’re securing a future for our threatened species.

The top 5

  1. A pair of Glossy black-cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus lathami) sit on a tree branch at Captain Cook's Lookout in Hat Head National Park.Glossy black-cockatoo

    Scientific name: Calyptorhynchus lathami
    Conservation status in NSW: Vulnerable
    Did you know? Glossy black-cockatoos only use their left foot to eat!

  2. Gang-gang cockatoos (Callocephalon fimbriatum)Gang-gang cockatoo

    Scientific name: Callocephalon fimbriatum
    Conservation status in NSW: Vulnerable
    Did you know? This cockatoo’s call has been likened to a creaking gate or cork being pulled from a bottle.

  3. Mountain pygmy-possum (Burramys parvus) during a survey of threatened species in Kosciuszko National ParkMountain pygmy-possum

    Scientific name: Burramys parvus
    Conservation status in NSW: Endangered
    Did you know? The mountain pygmy-possum was first discovered from a fossil in 1896. It was believed to be extinct. In 1966, a single living possum was found in Victoria and, because no other records of the possum existed, it was declared the rarest animal on earth by the Guinness Book of Records in 1967.

  4. Spotted-tailed quoll (Dasyurus maculatus)Spotted-tailed quoll

    Scientific name: Dasyurus maculatus
    Conservation status in NSW: Vulnerable
    Did you know? Quolls use scent marking at communal ‘latrine sites’ to communicate. These sites can be recognised by the accumulation of the sometimes characteristic ‘twisty-shaped’ faeces they deposit.

  5. Variable midge orchid (Genoplesium insigne) flowersVariable midge orchid

    Scientific name: Genoplesium insigne
    Conservation status in NSW: Critically endangered
    Did you know? This species is extremely difficult to locate even when in flower and cannot be definitively identified from leaf alone. It grows in patches of kangaroo grass (Themeda triandra), which can be ephemeral.

Congratulations to our 5 runners up

Brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata)Brush-tailed rock-wallaby
Scientific name: 
Petrogale penicillata
Conservation status in NSW:
 Endangered
Did you know?
Using their sharp claws and strong legs, brush-tailed rock-wallabies can climb tall trees!

 

Green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea)Green and golden bell frog
Scientific name: Litoria aurea
Conservation status in NSW: Endangered
Did you know? The green and golden bell frog is one of few Australian frogs to sometimes bask in the sun.

 

Powerful owl (Ninox strenua)Powerful owl
Scientific name: Ninox strenua
Conservation status in NSW: Vulnerable
Did you know? Young powerful owls remain with their parents for several months after fledging, and sometimes stay within their parents' territory for over a year.

 

Regent honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia)Regent honeyeater
Scientific name: Anthochaera phrygia
Conservation status in NSW: Critically endangered
Did you know? Regent honeyeaters are important pollinators of many species of eucalyptus.

 

Southern corroboree frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) lives in small pockets of Kosciusko National ParkSouthern corroboree frog
Scientific name: Pseudophryne corroboree
Conservation status in NSW: Critically endangered
Did you know? This rare frog is only found in a very small area (about 400 sq kms) of Kosciuszko National Park. Adult frogs weigh up to a teeny tiny 3 grams!