Nature conservation

Threatened species

Coolibah-Black Box Woodland in the Darling Riverine Plains, Brigalow Belt South, Cobar Peneplain and Mulga Lands Bioregions - profile

Indicative distribution


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Key:
known
predicted
The areas shown in pink and/purple are the sub-regions where the species or community is known or predicted to occur. They may not occur thoughout the sub-region but may be restricted to certain areas. ( click here to see geographic restrictions). The information presented in this map is only indicative and may contain errors and omissions.
Scientific name: Coolibah-Black Box Woodland in the Darling Riverine Plains, Brigalow Belt South, Cobar Peneplain and Mulga Lands Bioregions
Conservation status in NSW: Endangered Ecological Community
Commonwealth status: Endangered
Gazetted date: 14 May 2004
Profile last updated: 07 Sep 2017

Description

A woodland community of flora and fauna is found on the grey, self-mulching clays of periodically waterlogged floodplains, swamp margins, ephemeral wetlands, and stream levees. The structure of the community may vary from tall riparian woodlands to very open 'savanna like' grassy woodlands with a sparse midstorey of shrubs and saplings. Typically these woodlands form mosaics with grasslands and wetlands, and are characterised by Coolibah (Eucalyptus coolabah) and, in some areas, Black Box (E. largiflorens). Other tree species may be present including River Cooba (Acacia stenophylla), Cooba (A. salicina), Belah (Casuarina cristata) and Eurah (Eremophila bignoniiflora).

Distribution

The definition of this community has been recently expanded in a NSW Scientific Determination to include woodlands in Cobar Peneplain and Mulga Lands bioregions, in addition to the northern riverine plains in the Darling Riverine Plains and Brigalow Belt South bioregions. The Commonwealth also defines the community as extending further south.  

Habitat and ecology

  • Abiotic factors that help define this community are that it typically occurs on grey self-mulching clays of periodically waterlogged floodplains, swamp margins, ephemeral wetlands and stream levees.
  • The vegetative community provides characteristic habitat features of value to particular fauna, including a grassy understorey with scattered fallen logs, areas of deep-cracking clay soils, patches of thick regenerating Eucalyptus saplings, and large trees containing a diverse bark and foliage foraging resource and an abundance of small and large hollows. The fertile and relatively mesic environment of these woodlands provides essential resources for the persistence of fauna in the semi-arid region, supports a wide range of declining woodland birds and provides important nesting sites for colonial breeding waterbirds.

Regional distribution and habitat

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Threats

Recovery strategies

Activities to assist this species

Information sources

IBRA Bioregion IBRA Subregion Known or predicted Geographic restrictions region