Nature conservation

Threatened species

Castlereagh Scribbly Gum Woodland in the Sydney Basin Bioregion - profile

Indicative distribution


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Key:
known
predicted
The areas shown in pink and/purple are the sub-regions where the species or community is known or predicted to occur. They may not occur thoughout the sub-region but may be restricted to certain areas. ( click here to see geographic restrictions). The information presented in this map is only indicative and may contain errors and omissions.
Scientific name: Castlereagh Scribbly Gum Woodland in the Sydney Basin Bioregion
Conservation status in NSW: Vulnerable Ecological Community
Commonwealth status: Endangered
Gazetted date: 03 Dec 2010
Profile last updated: 06 Jul 2019

Description

Castlereagh Scribbly Gum Woodland in the Sydney Basin Bioregion is dominated by Eucalyptus parramattensis subsp. parramattensis, Angophora bakeri and E. sclerophylla. A small tree stratum of Melaleuca decora is sometimes present, generally in areas with poorer drainage. It has a well-developed shrub stratum consisting of sclerophyllous species such as Banksia spinulosa var. spinulosa, Melaleuca nodosa, Hakea sericea and H. dactyloides (multi-stemmed form). The ground stratum consists of a diverse range of forbs including Themeda australis, Entolasia stricta, Cyathochaeta diandra, Dianella revoluta subsp. revoluta, Stylidium graminifolium, Platysace ericoides, Laxmannia gracilis and Aristida warburgii (Tozer 2003).

Castlereagh Scribbly Gum Woodland in the Sydney Basin Bioregion occurs almost exclusively on soils derived from Tertiary alluvium, or on sites located on adjoining shale or Holocene alluvium (Tozer 2003). It is most often found on sandy soils and tends to occur on slightly higher ground than Castlereagh Ironbark Forest or Shale Gravel Transition Forest in the Sydney Basin Bioregion (Tozer 2003). The boundary between Castlereagh Scribbly Gum Woodland and Castlereagh Ironbark Forest or Shale Gravel Transition Forest in the Sydney Basin Bioregion appears to be a function of the interaction of localised drainage conditions and the thickness of the Tertiary alluvium mantle (Tozer 2003).

Distribution

Castlereagh Scribbly Gum Woodland in the Sydney Basin Bioregion is to occur within the local government areas of Bankstown, Blacktown, Campbelltown, Hawkesbury, Liverpool and Penrith (James 1997), but may occur elsewhere within the Sydney Basin Bioregion.

The main occurrence of Castlereagh Scribbly Gum Woodland in the Sydney Basin Bioregion is in the Castlereagh area of the Cumberland Plain, with small patches occurring at Kemps Creek and Longneck Lagoon. It is also present around Holsworthy, however the floristic composition in this area shows stronger similarities to Castlereagh Ironbark Forest than at other localities (Tozer 2003).

Castlereagh Scribbly Gum Woodland in the Sydney Basin Bioregion corresponds to the community of the same name described by Benson (1992) (Map Unit 14a), NSW NPWS (1997, 2002) and Tozer (2003) (Map Unit 6). It is similar to the Scribbly Gum woodlands found on perched sands in the Mellong Swamp area in Yengo and Wollemi National Parks, however there are distinct geological and floristic differences (James 1997).

Habitat and ecology

  • Occurs almost exclusively on soils derived from Tertiary alluvium, or on sites located on adjoining shale or Holocene alluvium.
  • Often adjacent to and on slightly higher ground than Castlereagh Ironbark Forest or Shale Gravel Transition Forest in the Sydney Basin Bioregion. The boundary with these units appears to be a function of the localised drainage conditions and the thickness of the tertiary alluvium mantle.
  • The shrub understorey includes a number of listed threatened species including Acacia bynoeana, Allocasuarina glareicola, Dillwynia tenuifolia, Grevillea juniperina subsp. juniperina, Micromyrtus minutiflora, Persoonia nutans and Pultenaea parviflora, and may also possibly contain Grevillea parviflora subsp. parviflora.
  • There are periodic fires in Castlereagh Scribbly Gum Woodland and most species are able to regenerate from lignotubers and buds beneath the bark, as well as seed stored in the soil.

Regional distribution and habitat

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Threats

Recovery strategies

Activities to assist this species

Information sources

IBRA Bioregion IBRA Subregion Known or predicted Geographic restrictions region
Sydney BasinCumberland Known None
Sydney BasinSydney Cataract Known None
Sydney BasinYengo Predicted None