Yuraygir National Park

Walking

Angourie Walk, Angourie to Brooms Head section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Go for a walk along one of the many tracks listed below. They range from short and easy to more challenging and longer walks.

The unique four day Yuraygir Coastal Walk traverses Yuraygir National Park, the longest stretch of protected coastline in NSW; you can complete the entire route in a single trip, but options for shorter half and single day walks are available and may suit your needs better.

 

Walking tracks

Angophora grove walking track

Wheelchair access: hard

Angophora grove walking track is an easy stroll from Illaroo picnic area through bushland adorned with gracious old angophoras. These native Australian trees are also known as smooth-barked apples because European settlers thought they resembled apple trees. Despite being closely related to eucalypts, angophoras are actually part of the myrtle family. Tea tree, coastal cypress and coastal banksia are also part of this forest.

Bring along your binoculars as migrating humpback whales may be visible in season, and osprey and brahminy kites are common to the area.

The walk can be done as a return trip, or it can be linked with Rocky Point track, which provides a loop walk from Illaroo South campground and offers scenic headland and beach views.

Plant communities: dry eucalypt forests

Rocky Point walking track

If you’re looking to experience this spectacular stretch of pristine coastline in an hour or two, Rocky Point walking track is the perfect choice.

This short walk offers outstanding examples of Yuraygir’s stunning coastal landscape, with beautiful views of sandy beaches and rocky headlands. It’s an easy walk, suitable for all ages and fitness levels, making it a perfect family day trip. 

Starting at Illaroo South picnic area, you’ll have several walking tracks to choose from. Follow the track signs to enjoy wide coastal views, intimate forest shades or sandy beaches. 

For birdwatchers, be sure to pack your binoculars as this is a great area to see coastal birds such as ospreys and brahminy kites. And in summer, enjoy whale watching as you admire the incredible humpback whales on their annual migration.

Plant communities: heathlands

Location:  shown on Minnie Water map

Corkwood and Scribbly Gum walking track

Wheelchair access: hard

Corkwood and Scribbly Gum walking track is a short, easy hike that follows Station Creek Estuary upstream through coastal and scribbly gum forest. Whether you’re staying at Station Creek campground and want to explore Yuraygir National Park, or are just looking for a place to stop off and stretch your legs while on a coastal road trip through NSW, this loop track is a great place to divert your attention.

As the name suggests, the forest you’ll be walking through supports a high number of corkwood and scribbly gum trees. The bark of both of these is among some of the most fascinating in the Australian bush. Corkwood has thick, corky bark, while scribbly gums appear to have been drawn all over by an excited toddler. In fact, the scribbles, scientists have discovered only this century, are made by a tiny moth. Naturally, the moth has been named the scribbly gum moth.

Plant communities: dry eucalypt forests

Freshwater track

Discover one of the Clarence Coast’s best-kept secrets on the Freshwater track. Starting at the northern end of Pebbly Beach campground, this short track leads you to a beautiful and remote beach.

Positioned on the park’s southern coastline, the Freshwater track forms part of the Yuraygir coastal walk’s Wooli to Red Rock section.

You’ll pass stately eucalyptus trees, coastal heathland and craggy rocks before arriving at the exquisitely isolated Freshwater Beach. Have you ever seen a wilder, more magnificent beach in your life? Walk along the beach and dip your toes in along the way, it’s also a good spot for a picnic lunch. Stay as long as you like before heading back to the track for the return walk.

Find out more about the Wooli to Red Rock walk

Plant communities: heathlands

Location:  shown on park map

Wilsons Headland walking track

Wheelchair access: medium

Assistance may be required to access this area

  • A section of this walk from Boorkoom campground is wheelchair-accessible
  • There's a 2km natural surfaced path along the cliff with impressive views
  • The southern entrance to the walk involves 800m of gravel path, consisting mostly of easy grades but there are two steep sections for which wheelchairs will need assistance

Walking near Wilsons Headland lookout, Illaroo to Wooli section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)The easy Wilsons Headland walking track links Boorkoom campground with Wilsons Headland picnic area, and comprises a small section of the Clarence Coast’s Yuraygir coastal walk. This short track winds along the coastline – passing stretches of endless ocean, isolated beaches and secluded coves.

Hike the track from late winter to early summer to be greeted by banks of wonderful wildflowers, or walk during whale watching season to spot migrating humpbacks. It will be no surprise to you that this easy walk is a long-time favourite among locals.

Strategically-placed seats and lookouts allow you to catch your breath and soak up the incredible views – why not take a picnic lunch to enjoy at one of these spots?

Find out more about the Yuraygir Coastal Walk, Illaroo to Wooli section.

Plant communities: heathlands

Location:  shown on Minnie Water map

Angourie walking track

Fire/closure alerts currently apply to this location. See details below.

Angourie Walk, part of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Angourie walking track is a moderately challenging route linking Mara Creek picnic area in the north with Shelley Headland in the south. This superb coastal hike passes through sections of coastland heath and along the seaward side of a ridge with views of sheltered bays and rocky shoals. Keep your binoculars handy for birds in the heath, as well as marine creatures – pods of dolphins, schools of sea mullet and bait fish, and migrating whales – often visible from this amazing vantage point. The route takes in a particularly scenic point called Dirrangan lookout.

At Shelley Headland, you can choose to turn back to tackle the 10km return hike of Angourie walking track, or do some fancy car shuffling and make it a one-way trip. Camping is available at Shelley Headland campground.

Angourie walking track is also part of Yuraygir coastal walk's Angourie to Brooms Head.

Angourie Surfing Reserve to Brooms Head

Plant communities: freshwater wetlands, heathlands

Location:  shown on Angourie map


Events, activities and alerts at this location
Closure

Angourie Back Beach staircase

The staircase at the southern end of the Angourie Back Beach has been removed due to safety concerns. You cannot access the Yuragyir Coastal Walk from the beach. All walkers should go via the walking track from Mara Creek Picnic Area.

Illaroo to Wooli walking track

Coastal emu (Dromaius novoaehollandiiae), Illaroo to Wooli, Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)If you're looking for a challenging coastal walk, then pack a picnic, put on your walking boots, and head for Illaroo to Wooli walking track with some friends. This relatively underdeveloped stretch of NSW coastline is at the southern end of Illaroo campground.

Spend your day walking along sandy beaches, across rocky platforms, grasslands and paperbark forests. There are superb coastal views from the headlands, where you can take in ocean breezes, do some birdwatching, and even enjoy whale watching during their annual migration. You’ll pass through several small settlements along this moderate track, and if you’re lucky, you might see evidence of the endangered coastal emu.

Illaroo to Wooli walking track can be tackled as a day walk or as a part of the multi-day Yuraygir coastal walk, which includes Brooms Head to Illaroo, in the north, and Wooli to Red Rock, to the south.

More information

Directions: best walked north to south with the sun at your back. For map and brochure download, see the Yuraygir Coastal Walk

Contact: Grafton, Phone: 02 6641 1500

Boorkoom stairs, Illaroo to Wooli section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Boorkoom stairs, Illaroo to Wooli section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Wilsons Headland Walk, Illaroo to Wooli section of Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Wilsons Headland Lookout, Illaroo to Wooli section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Wilsons Headland walk lookout, Illaroo to Wooli section of the Yuraygir Coast Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Walking near Wilsons Headland lookout, Illaroo to Wooli section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)

Wooli to Red Rock

Rocky platform south of Wooli, on the Wooli to Red Rock section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Andrew Lugg/DECCW)Wooli to Red Rock is the most strenuous and remote section of Yuraygir coastal walk. Enjoy the challenge of crossing rocky platforms when the tide’s out and crossing rivers using boat transport. The route can be tackled as a challenging day walk or part of a multi-day trek.

Hike long stretches of rocky shoreline interspersed with high-energy pebbly beaches, find the way across a tidal creek and walk along sandy beaches fringed with lush pandanus palms. You can even stop wherever you like and try your hand at fishing.

You’ll see protected habitat for the endangered little tern at either end of Station Creek Beach, near Station Creek campground. Keep your binoculars handy for spotting these tiny migratory seabirds with distinctive black, white and grey markings. Breeding has been increasingly successful due to management action and visitation control of this part of the national park.

More information

Directions: best walked north to south with the sun at your back. For map and brochure download, see the Yuraygir Coastal Walk.

Opening hours: Yuraygir National Park is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

Contact: Grafton, Phone: 02 6641 1500

Walking along Freshwater Beach, Wooli to Red Rock section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Andrew Lugg/DECCW)Pandanus trees are a feature of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Deborah Parkin/DECCW)Crossing Station Creek, Wooli to Red Rock section of Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Andrew Lugg/DECCW)Waiting to cross the Corindi River, Wooli to Red Rock section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Andrew Lugg/DECCW)

Angourie to Brooms Head

Fire/closure alerts currently apply to this location. See details below.

Walking by Redcliff headland as part of the Angourie to Brooms Head section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk, Yuraygir National Park (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)If you’ve decided to hike the entire Yuraygir coastal walk north to south, Angourie to Brooms Head is the first section and begins in world famous Angourie Surfing Reserve.

Angourie to Brooms Head is a great place to start a northern NSW coastal day walk or multi-day hike. This hiking track takes you through a variety of coastal ecosystems – over Mara Creek where it flows out at Back Beach and to the shores of beautiful Lake Arragan, and past caves on the southern side of Shelley headland. From Dirrangan lookout, take in sweeping scenic views and learn about the importance of the area to the local Yaegl People.

Have your binoculars handy to catch a glimpse of migrating whales between June and October, and dolphins all year round. Also keep a sharp eye out on the land for the endangered coastal emu, of which there are now less than one hundred in the park.

Directions: best walked north to south with the sun at your back. For map and brochure download, see the Yuraygir Coastal Walk.

Opening hours: Yuraygir National Park is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger. 

Contact: Grafton, Phone: 02 6641 1500

Plumbago Headland, Angourie to Brooms Head section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Walking near Lake Arragan, Angourie to Brooms Head section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Canoeing on Lake Arragan, Angourie to Brooms Head section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Sunset at Redcliff Beach, Angourie to Brooms Head section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Breakfast at Greycliff, Angourie to Brooms Head section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Walking along Redcliff Beach as part of the Angourie to Brooms Head section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk, Yuraygir National Park (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Camping at Greycliff, Angourie to Brooms Head section of Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)


Events, activities and alerts at this location
Closure

Angourie Back Beach staircase

The staircase at the southern end of the Angourie Back Beach has been removed due to safety concerns. You cannot access the Yuragyir Coastal Walk from the beach. All walkers should go via the walking track from Mara Creek Picnic Area.

Brooms Head to Illaroo

Walking to Sandon Beach, Brooms Head to Illaroo section of Yuraygir National Park (Image: Andrew Lugg/DECCW)If you love beach hiking then the moderate Brooms Head to Illaroo section of Yuraygir coastal walk is for you. Take in sweeping stretches of golden beaches and protected woodlands of paperbarks. There are scenic coastal views at the southern end of Brooms Head Beach which are ideal for whale watching and dolphin spotting.

At low tide, explore Plover Island, which holds great cultural significance for the Yaegl People. Middens and artefacts have been discovered in the area and information about these can be found on the island.

Sandon River, around the halfway lunch break mark, is the northernmost point of Solitary Islands Marine Park, which runs south for 75km to Muttonbird Island at Coffs Harbour. The small settlement of Sandon, on the south side of the river, is made up of only about 35 dwellings.

More information

Directions: best walked north to south with the sun at your back. For map and brochure download, see the Yuraygir Coastal Walk.

Opening hours: Yuraygir National Park is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

Contact: Grafton, Phone: 02 6641 1500

Plover Island, Brooms Head to Illaroo section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Andrew Lugg/DECCW)Walking near Plover Island, Brooms Head to Illaroo section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Walking near Plover Island, Brooms Head to Illaroo section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Andrew Lugg/DECCW)Stairs down to Sandon Beach, Illaroo to Wooli section of the Yuraygir Coastal Walk (Image: Andrew Lugg/DECCW)

Yuraygir coastal walk

Fire/closure alerts currently apply to this location. See details below.

Wheelchair access: medium

Small sections of the walk are accessible

Follow the ancient wandering trails of Australia’s coastal emus on the multi-day Yuraygir coastal walk.

This colossal signposted track traverses the coastline from Angourie to Red Rock. The scenery and views along the way are diverse and astounding. You’ll encounter wildlife and wildflowers as you walk past heathland plains, long sandy beaches, tranquil creeks, lagoons, rocky headlands and even a marine park.

Tackle the full 65km with overnight camping stops along the way or break the track up into shorter segments. It’s best walked north to south with the sun at your back.

However you choose to undertake this journey through the traditional homelands of the Gumbaynggirr and Yaegl nations, it’s unlikely you’ll ever forget it.

Itinerary

More information

Printable brochure and map

You can download the brochure and/or a map in PDF format to take with you:

Directions: best walked north to south with the sun at your back.

Contact: Grafton, Phone: 02 6641 1500

Walking across the rock platforms in Yuraygir National Park - this can be difficult and dangerous at times of high tide and big seas; check tide chart to ensure you cross rock platforms at low tide. (Image: Andrew Lugg/DECCW)Explore Plover Island, of great cultural importance to the Yaegl People, Yuraygir National Park (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Lake Arragan, Yuraygir National Park (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Kangaroos in Yuraygir National Park; you may encounter them along the Yuraygir Coastal Walk. (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Along the Yuraygir Coastal Walk you can camp in one of the campgrounds of Yuraygir National Park (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Yuraygir Coastal Walk offers heathlands plains, long sandy beaches, rocky headlands and abundant wildflowers and birds (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)Clarence Peak can be seen along the Yuraygir Coastal Walk in Yuraygir National Park (Image: Debra Novak/DECCW)


Events, activities and alerts at this location
Closure

Angourie Back Beach staircase

The staircase at the southern end of the Angourie Back Beach has been removed due to safety concerns. You cannot access the Yuragyir Coastal Walk from the beach. All walkers should go via the walking track from Mara Creek Picnic Area.

Walking: events and activities

Commercial activity

Auswalk

Auswalk offers quality accommodated walking holiday packages in many destinations.

Self-guided inn-to-inn walking holidays in the Blue Mountains and Snowy Mountains. Walk from one comfortable accommodation to the next through the national park. We move your luggage ahead for you. Follow our detailed walk notes and marked maps. Start any day of the year in season.

Group guided walking holidays in the Snowy Mountains. Join a group with two knowledgeable guides and hike through the area, staying in comfortable accommodation at night. We also have a spring snowshoeing trip in the Snowy Mountains.

Privately guided trips ranging from 1 to 5 days in the Sydney Harbour area and Blue Mountains.

More info: Auswalk, Phone: 03 5356 4971 (international +613 5356 4971)

As required
Commercial activity

Greg Clancy Guide

A black-necked stork near GraftonEcologist and wildlife-birding guide
This wildlife tour and guiding service is based on the NSW North Coast but offers guiding services covering much of the state.

Utilising a professional ecologist tour participants are provided with accurate identification of species of flora and fauna and their habitats as well as details of their behaviour.

The north coast of New South Wales lies in the region of Australia's highest biodiversity, known as the Macleay-McPherson overlap, where tropical species overlap temperate species.

Custom tours for the keen birdwatcher are also a specialty.

More info: Greg Clancy Wildlife Guide, Phone: 02 6649 3153 (international +612 6649 3153)

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