Culture and heritage

Heritage

Heritage news releases: 2013 archive

For media enquiries, please call 02 9995 5347 at the Office of Environment and Heritage media unit.

News items

Health Department Building (former), Macquarie Street, Sydney

The former Health Department Building in Macquarie Street, Sydney, has been listed on the State Heritage Register.  Now part of the refined and elegant Sir Stamford Hotel, the former Health Board building played central role in some of the major health issues faced by Sydneysiders and Australians in the twentieth century, including the plan conceived by Robert Paton, the first Director General of Public Health in NSW, to eradicate smallpox from the local population.  Free smallpox vaccinations were available at the premises from 1913. The site was also the location of the city’s only after hours enlistment centre during World War One and was volunteered by officers from the Health Department office or one of the state run hospitals.

Former Health Department Building, Sydney

Former Health Department Building, Sydney

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of the Health Department Building (Former)  on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:

  • The Health Department Building (former) is considered to be of state significance as an important surviving fabric of an early professional work of the Government Architect, W L Vernon that influenced the style of buildings produced by the newly formed Government Architect's Office;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage

Media release 22 September 2013

More information in the online database

Six Rail Heritage Items

Six rail heritage items have been listed on the State Heritage Register: Woy Woy Rail Tunnel, Emu Plains (Nepean River) Underbridge, Bulli Railway Station Group, Lithgow (James Street) Underbridge, Lithgow Coal Stage Signal Box and the Lithgow Railway Station Group and Residence. 

James Street(Underbridge) Lithgow

James Street(Underbridge) Lithgow

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of the six rail heritage items on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:

  • The sites are considered to be of State significance as rare and representative examples demonstrating the establishment, development and evolution of NSW Railways.
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance,
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage
More information in the online database  - Woy Woy Railway Tunnel

More information in the online database  - Emu Plains (Nepean River) Underbridge

More information in the online database  -  Lithgow Railway Station Group and Residence

More information in the online database -  James Street (Underbridge) Lithgow

More information in the online database  - Lithgow Coal Stage Signal Box

More information in the online database -  Bulli Railway Station Group

Jack House, Wahroonga,

In 1957 young architects Russell and Pamela Jack, with a war loan and on limited budget, designed their extraordinary home to sit comfortably in among the trees of their steep bush block in Wahroonga.

The flat-roofed post and beam house, constructed of timber and glass, located with great sensitivity to the natural features of the site including a small stream that flows through the block, is one of the first and most important examples of the Sydney School of architecture.

James Street (Underbridge) Lithgow

The custom made shutters are one of the many architectural details designed by the building’s architect, Russell Jack.

The Sydney School which flourished in the 1960s and 1970s was modernist design reflecting a concern for economy of design and sensitivity to the Australian environment. The house interiors include cabinetry designed by Jack, selected wallpapers and other furnishings of importance to the overall significance of the house which won the Sulman Medal for Domestic Design in 1957.
The house remained home to this groundbreaking and highly regarded architect and his wife for over 50 years.

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of the Jack House on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:
  • Jack House is considered to be of state significance as a is a an excellent and intact example of the work of mid-20th century Australian Modern Movement architect Russell Jack and a seminal example of the Sydney School of architecture dating from 1957;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage
More information in the online database

Montreal Community Theatre and Moveable Heritage Collection, Tumut

The Montreal Community Theatre, Tumut dating from 1929, has been listed on the NSW State Heritage Register by Minister Robyn Parker, MP.

The decade of the 1930s was the golden age of cinema going in Australia and a huge number of cinemas were designed and built in NSW towns. These picture theatres all offered a promise of excitement and glamour.    

In fact in 1951 there were still 351 rural theatres, all still intact and many still in operation, offering a focus for community cultural life and entertainment.     Sadly this is no longer the case and the beautiful Montreal Community theatre is one of only 11 rural cinemas remaining recognisable as a theatre.
James Street (Underbridge) Lithgow

Interwar stripped classical exterior façade of the Montreal Community Theatre, Tumut.

Even more amazing is that the theatre is still operating as a cinema and live theatre today because of the dedicated work of the Tumut Shire Council and the Theatre’s management committee. In the late 1990s the Committee galvanised the local community to donate and buy the theatre to ensure it remained in use. The theatre is operated entirely by volunteers who do everything including mending the proscenium curtains, cleaning and projecting the films. The Montreal Community Theatre is a living demonstration of how small rural theatres were and sometimes still are at the heart of their community.

The Montreal Community Theatre, Tumut dating from 1929, has been listed on the NSW State Heritage Register by Minister Robyn Parker, MP.

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of the Montreal Community Theatre and Moveable Collection on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:
  • Montreal Community Theatre and Moveable Heritage Collection is considered to be of state significance as a fine and rare example of a rural cinema in the stripped classical style in continuous operation for over 80 years;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage
Media release 19 June 2013


More information in the online database

Tocal College-C.B.Alexander Campus and Moveable Collection

Tocal College

Set in an open landscape of eucalyptus trees the lofty spire of the chapel is the centre piece of the brick college buildings

Tocal College, a superlative piece of enduring 20th century architecture designed by leading architects Phillip Cox and Ian McKay in 1965 has been given the State’s highest level of protection. Set upon a hillside across from historic Tocal Homestead, Tocal agricultural campus is cleverly integrated with its natural environment. The design of the Sydney School style campus was influenced by Gothic and Japanese architecture but used local craftsmanship and local materials in a uniquely Australian way. Inspired by the rustic grandeur of the local vernacular; barns and sheds with large rough sawn beams and expressed structural elements. The campus design is expressed in hand-adzed timbers, soaring roof trusses, colonnaded brick courtyards and an astonishing chapel spire. At its completion the campus was awarded both the Sulman and the Blacket architectural awards. The campus endures as a seminal work of architecture that is a highly influential piece of 20th century Australian architecture.

Reasons for listing

The Minister gave the following reasons for the decision to list the Bundian Way on the State Heritage Register

  • Tocal College—C.B. Alexander Campus and Movable Collection is considered to be of state significance as an outstanding example of institutional Sydney School architecture that played a significant role in the direction of Australian architectural practice in the latter half of the twentieth century;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage

Media release 17 April 2013

More information in the online database

New Hunter region nineteenth century homestead study released

Minister for Heritage, The Hon Robyn Parker MP, released a comprehensive new heritage study of the settlement of the wider Hunter region on 17 April 2013 at the State-listed Tocal Homestead complex (1841) near Maitland. The study was commissioned by the Heritage Council of NSW and captures a dynamic period between the 1820s-1850s when Europeans took over the land from the Aboriginal custodians, the Wonnarua people, and began intensive agriculture and farming. The process forever changed the landscape of the Hunter and has left a legacy of stunning nineteenth century homesteads, outbuildings and cultural landscapes that survive to this day. The report authors, Clive Lucas Stapleton and Partners examined the history of Aboriginal use of the land, the key personalities that settled the area, the nature of their farms and homes, the archaeological legacy of that activity, and the impact the process had in the Hunter region's economic and cultural development.

Volume 1: Historical context and survey of sites (13235huntesvol1.pdf 3.73MB)

Volume 2: Appendix 1: Hunter Estate database (13235huntvol2a1.pdf 1.98MB)

Volume 2: Appendix 2: Aboriginal archaeology report (13235huntvol2a2.pdf 1.96MB)

Volume 3: Appendix 3: Historic archaeology report (13235huntvol2a3.pdf 6.49MB)

The Grange, Bathurst

Entrance gates to The Grange from O’Connell Road

Open gates to the Grange homestead showing the original homestead with its wrap-around verandah

Built in 1830, just 17 years after the first road was forged through the Blue Mountains to Bathurst, the Grange is a traditional Georgian homestead overlooking the Fish River. Its wrap-around verandah is claimed to be the first constructed in Australia. The property also retains remnants of an historic Methodist cemetery on O’Connell Road. Minister Parker acknowledged the efforts of the owners, Edward and Lorraine Jones, in conserving this delightful colonial homestead and nominating it for heritage listing.

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of the Grange, Bathurst on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:
  • The Grange Bathurst is considered to be of State significance as one of the earliest homesteads to be built in inland Australia. Its wrap-around verandah is claimed to be the first of its kind to be built in Australia. Largely intact in its fabric, the Grange has potential to provide insights into early colonial life and conditions for convicts, some of whom were known to have been assigned to the farm.
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage.

More information in the online database

Savernake Station and Moveable Heritage   

Mustering Helen”, Ian Sloane’s photographic portrait of his daughter at Savernake, 1958

This fine black and white landscape photograph taken by the owner of the property in 1958 depicts a young woman on a sauntering horse in the middle distance, with the forms and shadows of trees encircling her in silhouette.

Savernake Station offers a unique insight into Australian rural life from the perspective of the Sloane family who have farmed this land since 1862. Savernake is a working station where everything has been kept including farm machinery, domestic wares, written records and high quality film and photography of the farm taken over several generations. It is a living museum. Farm-stay tourist accommodation and heritage tours of the old homestead building ensure that Savernake Station’s authentic historical story is publicly accessible.

Reason for listing

The Minister directed the listing of Savernake Stationon the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:
  • Savernake Station and Moveable Heritage is considered to be of State significance for its moveable heritage collections which comprehensively documents the operation of the property over successive generations;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage.

More information in the online database

Queanbeyan Showground

The Minister for Heritage has announced the listing of Queanbeyan Showground on the State Heritage Register for its strong cultural significance to the Aboriginal Community.  A ceremonial and gathering place where Aboriginal tribes and groups came together, the last recorded corroboree took place on the site in 1862. Aboriginal people are recorded to have gathered here for the annual blanket distribution which coincided with the traditional  gatherings that had been taking place long before white settlement. These gatherings were  important times of traditional exchange of information and ceremony with groups travelling  overland to attend from Braidwood, Yass and surrounding districts and as far afield as the coast.

Queanbeyan Showground as it appears today.

In the distance overlooking the grassed showground arena is the two storey grandstand with a tree casting a long shadow over the foreground.


Today the place has become the Queanbeyan Showground, and it continues to be a gathering place   for a diverse range of local cultural events. Listing on the State Heritage Register acknowledges   the significance of this  important heritage place.

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of Queanbeyan Showground on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons
  • Queanbeyan Showground is considered to be of State significance as the site of a traditional Aboriginal ceremonial and camping place in use before and after European settlement;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and  
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage.

More information in the online database

La Perouse Mission Church

 

The La Perouse Mission Church has played an important role in the history of the Aboriginal Christian movement in NSW from its foundation in 1894. (The present building dates from 1929). It has been associated with the

most significant missionary groups working with the Aboriginal people in NSW, including prominent women missionaries in its first decades of growth.    

The small timber Mission Church at La Perouse was a much loved focus of the local Aboriginal community for 100 years. Many of the present community remember its important place in their lives and look forward to work beginning on its restoration for community use.

Exterior view of La Perouse Mission Church

It is a well-loved building that has been held in high esteem by the past and present La Perouse community for the work of its missionaries and its enrichment of the spiritual and social life of the community. Plans are progressing to restore the church as a functional focus of the community.     

As the surviving missionary church of the former La Perouse Aboriginal Reserve the church also demonstrates the historical significance of the resilience of the La Perouse community in holding onto its lands in the face of repeated  attempts at relocation. Members of the present community can trace their ancestors back to pre-contact times.

Reasons for listing

The Minister directed the listing of the La Perouse Mission Church on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:
  • La Perouse Mission Church is considered to be of State significance for its role in the history of the Aboriginal Christian movement in NSW and for the high esteem in which it is held by the La Perouse Aboriginal community;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance.
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage.

More information in the online database

Ingleburn Military Heritage Precinct and Mont St Quentin Oval

The Ingleburn Military Heritage Precinct and Mont St Quentin Oval is of heritage significance as the entry point and command precinct of the first purpose built military training camp for WWII.
Entry gates to the Ingleburn Military Heritage Precinct

The gates to the Ingleburn Military Heritage Precinct span the entrance to the precinct providing a commanding entrance experience to the memorial precinct beyond. The sentry post can be seen to the left of the gates and the former Military Post office to the right behind the precinct fence.

The Mont St Quentin Oval was initially utilised as a parade ground for WWII troops at the site and was where the troops were formally farewelled before being shipped overseas in the early years of the war, prior to the construction of official parade grounds. The Military Heritage Precinct and Mont St Quentin Oval is also of significance as it represents one of the States key defence sites which coordinated the formation, training and dispatch of troops for most theatres of warfare during the 20th century.  The site has important associations with many military units which gave distinguished service in WWII such as the 16th Brigade of the 6th Division of the Second AIF. This was the first Australian unit to see armed conflict in WWII. It is also associated with and the 2/13th Battalion known as the 'rats of Tobruk' for their determined fighting during the siege of Tobruk. It also has historic associations with units fighting in the Korean War and the Vietnam War as well as with other social trends during the Vietnam War such as the anti war lobby.

Reasons for listing:

The Minister directed the listing of the listing of the site on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:
  • The Ingleburn Military Heritage Precinct and Mont St Quentin Oval are considered to be of State significance it is the entry point of the first purpose built military training camp for WWII. It is also of significance as one of the State’s key Army Camps which coordinated the formation, training and despatch of troops for most theatres of warfare during the 20th century. 
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance,  
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and  
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage
Media release  27 June 2013
More information in the online database

Yorbarnie, North Richmond

Yobarnie Keyline Farm at North Richmond, where Percival Yeomans developed his revolutionary ‘Keyline" system of rural land management, has been placed on the State Heritage Register by the Minister for Heritage – Robyn Parker MP. The Keyline system of soil improvement, erosion control, water storage, cultivation and irrigation was developed by Yeomans over two decades from 1943 to 1964 on Yobarnie. Keyline design, which maximises beneficial use of water resources on the land, has been highly influential in Australia and internationally, both within the permaculture community and in mainstream agriculture and examples of Keyline properties are found in Queensland, Victoria and in the USA.

Looking north from the main ridge on Yobarnie, three bodies of water appear to cascade down the hill towards Redbank Creek

Looking north from the main ridge on Yobarnie, three bodies of water align and the water appears to cascade down the hill towards Redbank Creek

In recommending the farm for listing, the Heritage Council of NSW recognised the efforts of the local community and the owners in having this property listed. The listing acknowledges the vital role Yobarnie played in developing an innovative approach to land management. The Heritage Council is now working with the owners to plan an innovative residential development for the site, one which conserves the important heritage values of the site while providing a unique living experience.

Reasons for listing:

The Minister directed the listing of Yobarnie Keyline Farm on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:
  • Yobarnie Keyline Farm is considered to be of state significance as the property on which PA Yeomans developed his Keyline system of soil improvement, erosion control, water storage, cultivation and irrigation which has been influential across Australia and internationally;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of State heritage significance,
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage.

More information in the online database

Fire and Rescue NSW, moveable heritage items listed on the State Heritage Register

Minister for Heritage, The Hon Robyn Parker MP, added a range of unique fire fighting equipment to the State Heritage Register. The event at the Museum of Fire was attended by the Local Member for Penrith, Mr Stuart Ayres MP and showcased the rich moveable heritage of the independent museum, which also manages items belonging to the NSW Fire Brigade. The listed items included the rare1869 Shand Mason 7 inch Fire Engine, an 1898 Shand Mason Curricle Ladder set, a Ford Mobile Canteen originally staffed by the Women’s Fire Auxiliary during World War Two, and the beautifully crafted timber Edward Smith Headquarters telephone switchboard. The listing also included a range of NSW Fire and Rescue Heritage Fleet vehicles.

Minister Parker congratulated the museum for maintaining the collection so passionately and for its efforts to have these items recognised for State heritage protection. “It’s wonderful to see the partnership between the museum staff, the Fire Brigade the Heritage and the staff of Branch of the Office of Environment and Heritage. It is important that all of the State’s heritage assets, including its unique moveable collections, are assessed for State Heritage Register protection under the Heritage Act 1977”, the Minister said.
istoric image of the Shand Mason 7 Inch Manual Engine being operated by 6 firemen

Shand Mason 7 inch Manual Engine

Reasons for listing:

The Minister directed the listing of the Fire and Rescue NSW, moveable heritage items on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:
  • the 1869 Shand Mason 7 inch Manual Fire Engine, the 1898 Shand Mason Curricle Ladders, the 1942 21 W Ford Mobile Canteen, the Edward Smith Switchboard and the Fire and Rescue Heritage Fleet are of state significance as rare and representative examples demonstrating the establishment and development of fire fighting techniques, technologies and practises from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century in NSW
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of these items of State heritage significance,
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of these items of the State’s heritage.


Media release 25 February 2013

More information in the online database

Key fire fighting equipment added to the State Heritage Register

 

Minister for Heritage in front of rare fire engine

Minister for Heritage Robyn Parker MP, Member for Penrith and Museum of Fire Director, at the heritage listing announcement.

Minister for Heritage, The Hon Robyn Parker MP, added a range of unique fire fighting equipment to the State Heritage Register. The event at the Museum of Fire was attended by the Local Member for Penrith, Mr Stuart Ayres MP and showcased the rich moveable heritage of the independent museum, which also managers items belonging to the NSW Fire Brigade. The listed items included the rare1869 Shand Mason 7 inch Fire Engine, an 1898 Shand Mason Curricle Ladder set, a Ford Mobile Canteen originally staffed by the Women’s Fire Auxiliary during World War Two, and the beautifully crafted timber Edward Smith Headquarters telephone switchboard. The listing also included a range of NSW Fire and Rescue Heritage Fleet vehicles.

Minister Parker congratulated the museum for maintaining the collection so passionately and for its efforts to have these items recognised for State heritage protection. "It’s wonderful to see the partnership between the museum staff, the Fire Brigade and the staff of the Heritage Branch of the Office of Environment and Heritage. It is important that all of the State’s heritage assets, including its unique moveable collections, are assessed for State Heritage Register protection under the Heritage Act 1977", the Minister said.

Media release 25 February 2013

More information in the online database

Towrang Convict Stockade, Associated Sites and Road Formations listed on the State Heritage Register

The sites associated with the construction of the convict built Great Southern Road have been listed on the State Heritage Register. The bridge, culverts, powder magazine, cemetery and archaeological sites area rare suite of convict        

Road Culvert

Stone road culvert, one of several located along the route of the old Great Southern Road. The equivalently of approximately two carriages ways wide, the arch is large enough for an adult to walk under.

road sites unaffected by significant development. Governor Darling directed the construction of the road during his administration (1825 – 1831) as part of his road building program for roads leading north, south and west of Sydney to promote economic development.  The roads also had the benefit of promoting the use of wheeled vehicles rather than servants to manually carry goods. Surveyed by Surveyor General Thomas Mitchell, the project was so great that the Towrang stockade is believed to have held the highest concentration of convicts in southern NSW during its operation.

Reasons for listing:

The Minister directed the listing of the Towrang Convict Stockade, Associated sites and Road Formations sites on the State Heritage Register for the following reasons:
  • The Towrang Convict Stockade, Associated Sites and Road Formations are considered to be of state significance as a rare, partially intact convict stockade and road side site. Constructed as part of Thomas Mitchell's Great South Road project, the stockade is believed to have held the largest concentration of convicts in southern NSW during its operation and provides insight into the nature of convict life and labour and early road building in NSW
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of these items of State heritage significance.
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the State’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the State’s heritage.

More information in the online database

Green Cape Maritime Precinct listinge on the State Heritage Register

The Minister for Heritage Robyn Parker MP has announced the listing of Green Cape Maritime Precinct on the State Heritage Register.

At the southern-most point of NSW, on the tip of the Green Cape peninsula, grandly stands the Green Cape Lighthouse and station. Overlooking what is aptly known as Disaster Bay, the construction of the lighthouse was a notable achievement in the protection of the important shipping trade from the treacherous hazards of the NSW coastline.

Designed by the Colonial Architect, James Barnet, the Green Cape Lighthouse was an ambitious development for its period for being one of the earliest and most extensive concrete constructions ever attempted in Australia.

Located prominently on the tip of the rocky peninsula, the Green Cape Lighthouse grandly stands over the lighthouse building complex.

Located prominently on the tip of the rocky peninsula, the Green Cape Lighthouse grandly stands over the lighthouse building complex.

Its construction was only possible because of the development of Bittangabee Bay as a trans-shipment point to receive materials, equipment and labour for the construction. These materials were then taken along a horse-drawn tramway, seven kilometres through the forest to the site of the lighthouse.

On the clear, calm night of May 30th 1886, and en-route from Melbourne to Sydney, the Ly-ee-Moon paddle-steamer ran full-speed into rocks at the base of the fully operational lighthouse.

Considered to be one of Australia's worst maritime disasters, 71 lives were lost in the shipwreck and only 15 men (ten crew and five passengers) survived. Of those that perished that night, only 24 bodies were ever recovered and buried in unmarked graves in a small cemetery a short distance from the lighthouse.

Today, Green Cape is an isolated but beautiful location for holiday-makers. Bittangabee Bay is also a popular camping site and, with the newly opened ‘Light to Light’ walking trail between the two sites, the lighthouse and its story is more accessible to the people of NSW than ever.

Reasons for listing:

The Minister gave the following reasons for the decision to list Green Cape Maritime Precinct on the State Heritage Register:

  • Green Cape Maritime Precinct is considered to be of state significance as it includes a notable 19th century lightstation and the shipwreck and cemetery of one of NSW’s worst maritime disasters;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of state heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the state’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the state’s heritage.

Media release 24 January 2013

More information in the online database

Bass Point Reserve- Shellharbour listed on the State Heritage Register

The Minister for Heritage Robyn Parker MP has announced the listing of Bass Point Reserve on the State Heritage Register. A popular and beautiful natural recreational reserve in Shellharbour, Bass Point Reserve is a 4km-long headland of natural landscape, rocky shorelines, sandy bays and clear blue water.

Bass Point Reserve

The natural bushland of Bass Point Reserve overlooks the rocky outcrops and clear blue waters of its many beautiful beaches.

Historically, Bass Point was a place of established occupation for the Aboriginal people for some 20,000 years prior to the arrival of European settlers and was regarded as a traditionally important camping and meeting place. Today, Bass Point continues to of exceptionally high significance to the Aboriginal people of NSW.

The pristine and diverse natural land and maritime environments that provide picturesque picnic spots, bushwalking trails and swimming sites, also support habitats for a wide variety of common, rare and critically endangered flora and fauna species.

The maritime landscape around Bass Point Reserve also contains a number of shipwrecks. Dating from as early as 1879, these wrecks are popular diving sites that demonstrate the often treacherous nature of the beautiful NSW coastline.

Reasons for listing:

The Minister gave the following reasons for the decision to list Bass Point Reserve on the State Heritage Register:
  • Bass Point Reserve is considered to be of state heritage significance for its Aboriginal and European values; its pre- and post-contact history; and its natural and maritime heritage;
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of state heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the state’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the state’s heritage.
More information in the online database

Bundian Way

Bundian Way, an ancient pathway that links high country around Mount Kosciusko with the far south coast of NSW, has been given the State’s highest level of protection. At 265 km long, the Bundian Way is the longest pathway surviving in land that is relatively unchanged since colonisation, known to exist in NSW.  Once pathways used by Aboriginal people crisscrossed the land to the north and south and east and west.


In summer in the high country Aboriginal people feasted on the migrating Bogong moth. In the spring people would travel to the coast in order to attend the whale gatherings at Bilgalera (Fishermans Beach). People walked the  Bundian pathway not  just to attend a  corroboree or gathering or to access a particular food supply, but for practical, ceremonial and educational purposes: to maintain kinship ties, conduct business and trade, share knowledge and resources or make alliances and settle disputes.

Bundian Way from Kosciusko

Three members of the survey team stand dwarfed on top of Mount Kosciusko looking down along the Bundian Way towards the coast on the distant horizon.

The Bundian Way was shared with settlers and explorers and made possible the settlement of the country in the far south coast. The cultural knowledge associated with the Bundian Way has persisted into modern times and the Way continues to be highly significant to Aboriginal people in south east New South Wales and the Monaro. State heritage listing means that the Bundian Way is protected under the NSW Heritage Act 1977 for future generations, and that any significant works on the route would be subject to decisions or advice from the Heritage Council of NSW.

The Bundian Way will be the first listing of its kind in NSW. It is the longest item to be listed on the State Heritage Register and it is the first time an Aboriginal pathway has been listed.

Reasons for listing:

The Minister gave the following reasons for the decision to list Green Cape Maritime Precinct on the State Heritage Register:
  • The Bundian Way provides historical evidence of the cultural life of Aboriginal people of the Monaro and of the South Coast and their inter-relationships with each other as well as direct evidence of the important role Aboriginal people played in early exploration and settlement by white colonists by providing knowledge of the pathways and the places where resources such as food and water could be found; 
  • Listing will provide for the identification and registration of this item of state heritage significance;
  • Listing will promote an understanding of the state’s heritage; and
  • Listing will encourage the conservation of this item of the state’s heritage.

More information in the online database

Page last updated: 23 December 2013