Environmental issues

Pests and weeds

Feral bees

Feral honeybees are introduced bees that originally escaped from hives and have become established in the wild. Colonies can be found in many parts of NSW, usually living in tree hollows.

Honeybees have several impacts on native environments. They:

  • take tree hollows that are needed by native birds and animals, making it hard for some species to find shelter or breed
  • eat nectar and pollen which native birds, insects and other animals need to survive, possibly forcing these native species out of an area
  • may affect the pollination of native plant species.
Competition from feral honeybees - key threatening process listing
The NSW Scientific Committee has declared feral honeybees to be a 'key threatening process' in NSW. See its reasons for making this declaration.

Introduction of the large earth bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) - key threatening process listing
The NSW Scientific Committee has declared the potential introduction of the large earth bumblebee to NSW to be a 'key threatening process' in the state. See its reasons for making this declaration.

Competition from feral honeybees - factsheet (PDF - 37KB)
This publication gives an overview of why the NSW Scientific Committee declared feral honeybees a key threatening process, and explains the effect of this declaration.
Page last updated: 02 November 2011