Timber Repair: Termites as a threat to buildings and the current physical and chemical methods for their control

Termites have their natural place in Australia, the few species that cause problems to us should not condemn the majority which form a vital part of the land with their nutrient recycling and food-chain contribution.

Date
1 April 2000
Publisher
Heritage Office
Type
Heritage publications, Maintenance series, Publication
Status
Final
Cost
Free
Language
English
Tags
  • ISBN 1-87641-5452
  • File PDF 35KB
  • Pages 7
  • Name termites-threat-to-buildings-and-current physical-chemical-methods-for-their-control.pdf

Termites are highly specialised social insects. They form colonies or nests and have three distinct forms or castes. The reproductive caste includes the parent king and queen, supplementary queens (neotenics), and immature reproductives which develop wings (alates) to fly from the parent colony to start new colonies. The worker caste, which is the food gatherer and builder, is sterile, wingless and lacks pigmentation in most species. The soldier caste has an enlarged pigmented head which often includes a pair of massive jaws – used for defence of the colony.